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Thread: New York Taxi

  1. #511

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    Can't you just hook 'em to the back?

    Which one? ... the jump seats or the wheelchairs???.

  2. #512
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    How about a rumble seat?


  3. #513

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    I am not familiar with the new Ford thingy, but generally SUVs do not make good taxis, at least not in NYC. Every time they hit a pot hole, it feels like the whole vehicle is going to break into a thousand pieces. A nice fat sedan with a soft suspension is needed. Doesn't anybody makes those anymore?

  4. #514
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It all depends on the SUV you get into.

    Fall to pieces? That is odd, considering that the original SUV's were designed for rough road, and the current ones drive like giant lumps of Fiber Fill (Especially ones like Ford with soft chassis, at least, that is what they had on the old Explorer).

    I guess they just need softer suspensions, which CAN be done after market if needed.

  5. #515

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    Ford Escape SUV are the one being used as taxis ONLY because it comes in Hybrid model. It FAILS in EVERY other category desired in an OPTIMUM taxi.

  6. #516
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The Taxi of Tomorrow Is Down to 3 Choices

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM



    The finalists, from top: Karsan, Nissan and Ford.


    Lots of headroom. Sloping picture windows. A spacious trunk, and the oblong frame of a minivan.

    This could soon be the new look of the New York City taxicab, an icon of the urban streetscape that is set for an unprecedented overhaul in 2014.

    The Bloomberg administration on Monday unveiled three finalists in its Taxi of Tomorrow competition, which will replace the current fleet of sedans and hybrid sport utility vehicles with a single design for the next decade.

    The three competing designs, submitted by Ford, Nissan and the Turkish manufacturer Karsan, bear little resemblance to the Ford Crown Victoria, the current stalwart of the fleet, which is to be discontinued next year.

    All three designs feature a tall roof familiar to taxi passengers in London, and a generously sized backseat area with far more legroom than the cramped hybrid cars currently on the streets.

    The winner of the contest will receive an exclusive right to supply the city’s yellow taxis for a decade, but officials on Monday insisted that the competition remained in flux.

    Officials at the Taxi and Limousine Commission expect to continue negotiating with the manufacturers over specific features like wheelchair accessibility and legroom.

    “Each is promising, but none is perfect,” Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said of the designs. “We are not obliged to go with anything if it does not meet our needs.”

    A Web site has been set up for the public to weigh in on the competitors and answer questions about what sorts of features they would like to see in a taxi.

    A winner is expected to be announced early next year, and the first new cars will be rolled out by the fall of 2014, officials said.

    Ford’s submission, the Transit Connect, is a customized version of a commercial vehicle already on the market in Europe. Nissan’s North American branch submitted a design based on its NV200 van.

    Karsan, a Turkish manufacturer that builds cars for Fiat and Hyundai, submitted the only design that was not based on a pre-existing vehicle. Its car, the V1, is the only candidate that is fully wheelchair accessible.

    David S. Yassky, the city’s taxi commissioner, said Ford had a history of reliable service with the city, but Nissan’s design featured the most legroom and the potential for an entirely electric vehicle. The Karsan design earned points for its accessibility options.

    Anyone who fills out the online survey is entered into a raffle to win up to $5,000 worth of free taxi rides.

    Four other submissions were rejected by the city, including a design from General Motors.

    Some taxi garage owners have expressed hesitation about the contest, saying they are concerned they will be beholden to a single manufacturer for parts and maintenance.

    For more debate on the Taxi of Tomorrow, see the coverage on the Wheels blog of a discussion last week at the Museum of the City of New York.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...er=rss&emc=rss

  7. #517
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Ick.

    No style what-so-ever.

    Paint them white and remove the windows and you could be delivering raw meat... :P

  8. #518

  9. #519
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    I want a fleet of Cash Cabs.

  10. #520
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    I don't like that all the new options are glorified mini-vans. Why not just buy 14,000 station wagons plastered with faux wood veneer and driven by soccer moms named Sarah while you're at it. The dorkification of New York at its finest

    Bureaucrat design spec fail.

  11. #521

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    Imagine they choose a single vehicle and that vehicle turns out a lemon... the whole fleet would be screwed..

  12. #522

    Default NYC Cab Redesign

    If It Weren’t Yellow, You’d Hardly Know It Was a Taxi
    Ruth Fremson/The New York Times
    The taxi commissioner, David S. Yassky, at a news conference on Monday with Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg to unveil finalists for a taxi design that would eventually replace all existing cabs.

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

    Published: November 15, 2010




    Lots of headroom, sloping picture windows, a spacious trunk and a roof resembling a top hat. Is this the new look of the New York City taxi?

    Enlarge This Image

    Nissan’s entry.

    Enlarge This Image

    Ford’s entry.

    Enlarge This Image

    The entry of Karsan, a Turkish company.



    An icon of the urban landscape, the humble yellow cab is set to undergo an unprecedented face-lift — perhaps the biggest change to the city’s street aesthetic since licensed cabs were required to be painted yellow in 1970.
    The Bloomberg administration on Monday unveiled three finalists in its competition to replace the current taxis, a mishmash of sedans, minivans and hybrid sport utility vehicles, with a single City Hall-approved model.
    By 2014, when the first new vehicles are expected to appear, the city’s taxis will bear more resemblance to the oblong, obsolete Checker cab than the fleet’s current stalwart, the Ford Crown Victoria, which is to be discontinued next year.
    All three competing designs, submitted by Ford, Nissan and the Turkish manufacturer Karsan, have the bulky appearance of a minivan. Gone is the cramped legroom of a hybrid car: these interiors feature generously sized backseats and, in Karsan’s case, a rear-facing drop seat to encourage conversation among passengers (that, or motion sickness).
    The winner of the contest will receive the exclusive right to supply the cabs for the city’s fleet of just over 13,000 taxis for at least a decade. Taxi officials said the contract could have an overall potential value of $1 billion.
    On Monday, officials said that the competition remained in flux. “Each is promising, but none is perfect,” Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said of the design entries. “We are not obliged to go with anything if it does not meet our needs.”
    The Taxi and Limousine Commission is expected to continue negotiating with the manufacturers over specific features like wheelchair accessibility and seating dimensions. And an online survey has been set up for the public to say whether it would like sunroofs, electrical chargers or other amenities added to the final design.
    David S. Yassky, the taxi commissioner, said he expected a winner to be announced early next year, although the process had been delayed before; the commission had originally planned to sign a contract last month but pushed back the deadline.
    Ford’s entry, the Transit Connect, is a customized version of a vehicle already on the market, and Mr. Yassky said the submission benefited from Ford’s history of reliable service with the city. A design by Nissan’s North American branch, based on the company’s NV200 van, featured the most legroom and the potential for an entirely electric propulsion system.
    Karsan, which builds cars for Fiat and Hyundai, submitted a design that was entirely original for the project. Its entry, the V1, is the only finalist that is fully accessible to passengers in wheelchairs, and the car could potentially include wireless Internet access. Four other submissions were rejected by the city, including a design from General Motors.
    The announcement on Monday set off a flurry of responses in the city’s close-knit cab industry, and the reactions were not particularly positive. Assemblyman Micah Z. Kellner, who represents the Upper East Side, said he was disappointed that wheelchair accessibility was only an option for the winning design, not a requirement. “The whole purpose of this exercise is to find a vehicle that is designed and built to be the right taxi for all New Yorkers,” he said.
    Taxi owners, meanwhile, expressed concern that an exclusive contract would tie them to a single manufacturer for parts and maintenance.
    That sentiment was echoed by Bhairavi Desai, executive director of the Taxi Workers Alliance, a drivers’ group, who said her members could have a tougher time finding help if something went wrong with their vehicle.
    She said the higher cost of the custom taxis could also be a burden. “If there is money to be spent, we think it should go to improve the working conditions before it goes to beautify the vehicle,” Ms. Desai said.
    Mr. Yassky, the commissioner, said the competition would allow the city to vet the manufacturers ahead of time, and ultimately result in lower costs for owners and drivers.
    “This way, the city can aggregate the buying power” of taxi owners and get a better deal, he said. “Only the city can do that for them.”

  13. #523

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    I actually think I like the Karsan design the best here . . . .

  14. #524

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    Good idea eliminating the front passenger seat altogether. Can't tell if the trunk space is big enough.

    Wish it wasn't so funky looking outside.

  15. #525

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    Merging with existing thread.

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