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Thread: New York Taxi

  1. #526
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    REALLY do not like the exterior design on the Turkish submission.....

    It feels plastic. Like something you would see in...well...Turkey (actually, maybe more like the Japanese ambulances or something)....

    The other two are nothing special.

    Yeah, why bother making the vehicle LOOK NICE.

    Hey, lets make them all Cash Cabs!! (Love that show NYK)

  2. #527
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    That Cabby Dress Code? It’s Getting a Makeover

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

    There is a dress code for New York City cabdrivers. Seriously. It is right there on Page 23 of the 62-page manual the city issues to cabbies detailing the rules and regulations regarding their conduct and comportment.

    No tube shirts; no tank tops; no bathing trunks. Sartorial scofflaws face a $25 fine. Truth is, though, the rule has come to be regarded as at once overly specific and underenforced.

    Now, the city’s taxi regulators want to change that. The Taxi and Limousine Commission is issuing a new dress code — broader in language, in the hopes it can be more widely followed: all cabdrivers, the new code states, must “present a professional appearance.”

    Taking on the issue of cabdriver attire may be an ambitious task for a city agency that still struggles to meaningfully impose basic, arguably more pressing rules of the road: keep to the speed limit; hang up that cellphone. But officials said they were committed to enhanced vigilance.

    “Proper dress is not something that we can enforce very easily,” said David S. Yassky, chairman of the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission. “Nonetheless, we want to communicate to drivers that there is a standard of behavior, and that’s what the rule should get across.”

    “Apparently,” Mr. Yassky added, “the original draft also prohibited wide ties. No, just kidding.”

    Many cabbies, accustomed to the come-as-you-are culture of the front seat, said they were unaware that their dress had ever been regulated. No wonder: since 1996, the taxi commission has issued only 42 dress code violations to drivers, or about three per year.

    In interviews, drivers said they tried to dress neatly, if comfortably, for a job that requires them to spend 12 hours a day on the streets. That has often meant a wardrobe of loose-fitting clothes, sweatshirts and blue jeans.

    But some of the better-dressed cabbies said the rules were a positive step for the industry.

    Zack Doganay, a cabby for 32 years, drives his fares around the city in an orange Ralph Lauren wool sweater, a blue checked scarf and a pair of cap-toe oxford shoes.
    “I respect myself, and I get more respect,” he said the other day, filling up his cab at a gasoline station on 10th Avenue. Or, as Jimmy Hyacinthe, a cabby in a plain white T-shirt, put it: “A suit and tie is unnecessary, but comfortable and clean is important.”

    For decades, the cabby rulebook referred to the matter of dress with a terse, simple rule: “A driver shall be clean and neat in dress and person.”

    But in 1987, prompted by complaints about unkempt and discourteous cabbies, the city amended the code to include a ban on certain items of clothing. Open-toed sandals, shirts with no sleeves, and trousers that stopped above midthigh all were prohibited, and holes in pants were strictly forbidden.

    The beefed-up dress code proved more aspirational than practical; only 10 summonses were issued in the six months after it took effect. The city later relaxed the rules, dropping most of the requirements, including a detailed instruction that drivers “must wear a collared shirt or blouse, without holes, that if it has buttons, must be buttoned except for the top two buttons.”

    But a sentence that banned tank tops and bathing wear, among other items, never went away, even as some of its specific restrictions faded in relevance. Cut-off shorts, for instance, fell out of favor (for men, at least) sometime around the start of the Clinton administration.

    The revised code, which is expected to be approved at a public hearing next month, drops any mention of specific types of apparel. Mr. Yassky, the taxi commissioner, said the change was part of an effort to simplify the city’s mammoth rulebook.

    “Trying to have a rule that applies to fashion trends is a losing game,” he said.

    Mr. Yassky said there was no talk of a formal uniform for cabbies, although the idea has been proposed from time to time.

    The earliest New York cabbies wore immaculate uniforms modeled after cadet clothes at West Point. By 1925, the city required cabbies to wear a knitted cap, white linen collared shirt, coat and necktie. Drivers were also expected to be “temperamentally fitted for the job,” according to the book “Taxi! A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver.”

    That book’s author, Graham Hodges, a former cabby himself, said he once drove his taxi shirtless on a particularly hot summer day in the 1970s. His excuse? No air-conditioning. “I was told by a cabby that if I didn’t put a shirt on, I’d get a ticket,” he recalled on the telephone recently.

    Told of the proposed rule change, Mr. Hodges, now a history professor, lamented a lost era in the annals of cabby clothing.

    “People would frequently wear T-shirts that would state antiwar expressions; you just don’t see a lot of that these days,” he said.

    “I’m not sure if that’s a good or bad thing,” he added. “It would be nice to see cabdrivers expressing their opinions again.”

    Mr. Yassky said he did not necessarily expect the new rule to result in additional summonses. Still, Bhairavi Desai, the executive director of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, an advocacy group for drivers, said she was shocked to hear that it was even possible to fine a cabby for the way they were dressed.

    “What was it about? Somebody wore shorts?” Ms. Desai said. “I would be concerned if the idea of professional attire is left to the naked eye to decide.”

    And Dido Goze, a driver from Ivory Coast, said he took umbrage at the suggestion that cabbies may need a makeover.

    “ ‘Professional’? We do that already,” Mr. Goze said, standing by his Crown Victoria in faded jeans and a black fleece sweater. “I don’t know why they need to change it.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/26/ny...1&ref=nyregion

  3. #528
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  4. #529
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    You talkin' to me?

  5. #530
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    You talkin' to me?
    Well you must be talkin to me; I'm the only one here...

  6. #531
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    You know, they're filming a sequel. Maybe they'll call it, "You talkin' to me.... again?"

  7. #532
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Did not know that; hopefully it will live up the previous; sequals rarely do though.

  8. #533
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    He is spoofing the Travolta flik....



    Baaaaaad.



    Look Who's Talkin' to Me Now!

  9. #534
    I admit I have a problem
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    Does it seem like cabbies are refusing more rides lately? I've had a bunch lock their doors till I tell them where I'm going, and then half the time they say no.
    I don't think it's me ... I'm a reasonably well-put-together guy in my 30s.

    (And mostly I've been going to places in Midtown! Good luck to anyone trying to go to the Bronx or the Rockaways ...)

  10. #535
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Well are you an Indian man refusing to remove your Turban in public??!?!?!


    You know that is a sign of being a terrorist!!!!!

  11. #536

    Default

    You will get in one soon but which one?...

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/media/totweb...rrow_home.html

  12. #537

    Default Where Do All the Cabs Go in the Late Afternoon?



    Where Do All the Cabs Go in the Late Afternoon?


    New data have confirmed the perception that just as the afternoon rush is beginning, taxicabs disappear by the hundreds. Many are heading to Queens for a shift change.

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

    Published: January 11, 2011

    Ever feel as if you can’t get a cab around 5 o’clock? Now there’s scientific proof that you’re right.




    Chang W. Lee/The New York Times
    At 5:05 p.m. on Lexington Avenue and 64th Street, off-duty taxis passed a woman hailing a cab.

    There is new data to confirm what generations of New Yorkers have long known in their bones: Just as the afternoon rush is about to begin, the taxicabs disappear by the hundreds.

    From 4 to 5 p.m., the traditional hour for cabs to change shifts, the number of active taxicabs on the streets falls by nearly 20 percent compared with an hour before, according to a city review of GPS records taken from thousands of cab trips over the past year.

    In fact, the number of cabs that pick up at least two fares during that taxicab witching hour is the lowest of any hour between 7 a.m. and midnight, the data show. This vanishing trend turned up in the data regardless of time of year or day of the week.

    The hour from 4 to 5 p.m. has long been considered a low tide of taxi service, the maddening moment when, in apparent violation of the laws of supply and demand, entire fleets of empty yellow cabs flip on their off-duty lights and proceed past the outstretched hands of office workers seeking a way home.

    But despite decades of complaining from miffed New Yorkers, taxi officials have never been able to gauge the true extent of the shift changeover’s effect on service, until now.

    “It’s not just urban legend,” said David S. Yassky, the chairman of the Taxi and Limousine Commission, who asked his agency to investigate the phenomenon. “It’s a real dip.”

    The Bloomberg administration, which prides itself on data-driven policy, is still grappling with how to handle the discovery. Mr. Yassky said that, so far, he had no plans to ask for any changes to the industry’s schedule, although his team is still considering its options.

    Mr. Yassky said the city “should be circumspect about substituting its judgment for the judgment of business people.” But he acknowledged that any attempt at regulation would have to take into account the forces that have kept the practice in place for years.

    The explanation for the 5 p.m. dip is steeped in the history and economics of the taxi industry. Many taxicabs are used by two drivers a day, each working a 12-hour shift. To ensure that each leg is equally attractive, taxi owners schedule the shift change in the middle of the afternoon, so each shift gets a rush hour.

    But the switch can’t happen too early, either: a 2 p.m. changeover, for instance, would require a day driver to start his 12-hour shifts in the wee hours of the morning. And cabbies say the midafternoon offers brisk business not evident 12 hours later, when fares mainly consist of late-night revelers.

    Hence, the 5 p.m. compromise. When the changeover became standard, its timing did not pose a big problem for passengers. Many taxi garages were situated on the far West Side of Manhattan, requiring cabs to make only a short trip to 11th Avenue before heading back to Midtown with a fresh driver.

    But in the 1980s, as commercial rents rose, taxi fleets began migrating across the East River, particularly to Long Island City, Queens. The 5 p.m. shift change now included a journey over the often-packed Queensboro Bridge, not to mention the return slog to the city. Drivers started going off duty between 4 and 4:30 p.m., to ensure that they had enough time to make it to the garage; even today, tardy cabbies can be hit with a $30 fine.

    If the system changed, “I’d be very upset,” Youssef Kamel, 34, a day driver from Brooklyn, said the other day. Mr. Kamel was at the BP station on Houston Street, which is among several places that serve as transfer points for driver-owned taxicabs, unaffiliated with a fleet. The gas station gets so busy after 4 p.m. on weekdays, with dozens of cabs gassing up and changing drivers, that managers wave off private automobiles, asking them to return after 5.

    The rising popularity of the driver-owned model means that more cabbies today coordinate a handoff in Manhattan, which may be lessening the impact of the 5 o’clock dip.

    “There are more drivers changing shifts in Manhattan today than ever before,” said David Pollack, the publisher of Taxi Insider, a monthly industry publication.

    Some of the 5 p.m. frustration, Mr. Pollack added, could be about perception. “It’s like Fred Flintstone at 5 o’clock: The whistle blows and everybody wants a cab,” he said.
    There is precedent for the city to regulate livery drivers so that they better meet customer demand.

    A publication from 1839, “By-laws and ordinances of the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of the City of New York,” decrees that the mayor can make rules “respecting the standing of horse coaches and carriages at or near the theaters and other places of amusement at night, and at and near steamboats and other vessels at all times, and at and upon the stands designated and specified for such Coaches, as may be necessary to preserve order and decorum.”

    Indeed, the issue has not gone ignored by the taxi lords. A 1987 dictate by the City Council ordered the taxi commission to investigate the feasibility of staggering shift changes throughout the afternoon, in an attempt to free up more cabs during rush hour. That report has since been lost to history, and the practice continued unabated.

    In 2004, the city took a more aggressive approach, implementing a $1 surcharge on fares between 4 and 8 p.m. on weekdays in an explicit attempt to encourage more drivers to work in the afternoon rush. “We believe that the 20 percent dip would be even worse if it weren’t for the surcharge,” Mr. Yassky said.

    Still, Mr. Yassky acknowledged that the afternoon taxi drought remained “one of the two or three things that people routinely bring up to me.” One recent complainant was former Mayor Edward I. Koch, who mailed a letter to Mr. Yassky a few days before Christmas, asking about “a dearth of available cabs in the late afternoon.”

    “One of my law partners remarked on the fact that at 4 o’clock, you can’t get a cab,” Mr. Koch said in an interview last week. “Wouldn’t it make sense to have a substantial number of cabs on duty at all times?”

    “In government,” Mr. Koch added, “nothing goes away. This is a perennial.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/12/ny...er=rss&emc=rss

  13. #538
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    They need to do one of two things:

    1. Stagger shifts.
    2. Have a shuttle/pick up drop off for the drivers.

    These guys may not be able to afford a full garage in or near the city, but having a swap/drop point would make switching out MUCH easier.

  14. #539

    Lightbulb

    In my opinion, "Share a Ride" concept is the only solution to rush hour taxi blues.. IT GOES LIKE THIS...

    If they wish, taxi drivers should be allowed to designate their taxis as DOWNTOWN ONLY in the morning rush (7-10 am) and UPTOWN ONLY in the evening rush (4-7 PM)... they would stay on TLC designated avenues ONLY.. they would pick up and drop off as many times as they wish .. at any given time, their capacity would be limited to 3 passengers...customer would pay for the distance they travel at 50% discount...all surcharges including the 50 cents MTA surcharge would NOT be collected from Share a Ride Passengers.. they could pay by Credit Cards.. their fare would be designated to the seat they are in to avoid any confusion...and these taxis would have a highly visible sign designating them as "Share a Ride" taxis..

    This WILL work, all TLC has to do is have the guts to implement it....

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    Sounds interesting, but would customers go for it? From what I've heard people didn't really use the share a ride test programs

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