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Thread: New York Taxi

  1. #61

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    RATE HIKE WORTH WAIT: CABBIES New York Post - New York, N.Y. Author: JEREMY OLSHAN Transit Reporter Date: Sep 15, 2006 Start Page:


    Waiting in New York is a bargain compared to Miami, Boston, or Seattle, TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said. "We're at the bottom of the barrel and it's really not fair. Drivers deserve this and passengers can handle it".







    The waiting time is to be doubled to $24 per hour from current $12 per hour.. This rate have not seen a hike since 1990..


    And the flat rate of $45 from JFK into Manhattan will also apply to trips back to JFK from any location in Manhattan thus ending the confusion that has been there since the implimentation of the flat rate...

  2. #62

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    Commission Is Set to Discuss a Possible Increase in Taxi Fares


    September 14, 2006, Thursday
    By WILLIAM NEUMAN (NYT); Metropolitan Desk.....The Taxi and Limousine Commission is to begin considering today a plan that would increase taxi fares by as much as 11 percent, as well as the creation of a flat fare of $45 from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, to mirror the fare for trips in the opposite direction, ...
    Last edited by milleniumcab; September 27th, 2006 at 11:12 PM.

  3. #63

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    Here's a taxi fare finder that seems to be pretty accurate. Hopefully this will cut down on the amount of questions we get about cost:

    http://www.nyccabfare.com/

  4. #64

    Default Can you please wait for me, don't worry you can run the meter!...

    New York City cabs have gotten a fare adjustment on the standing meter!...

    Idle taxis, running meters: Cost of NYC cab ride jumps - USATODAY.com*
    Last edited by milleniumcab; October 26th, 2006 at 10:28 PM.

  5. #65

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    INCREASE IN CAB FARES

    NY TIMES...

    By WILLIAM NEUMAN
    Published: October 26, 2006
    The Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday unanimously approved a fare increase that will double the amount a passenger pays while a cab is stopped or stuck in slow traffic. The change amounts to an increase of approximately 11 percent to the overall fare. Taxi meters now charge 20 cents a minute while the vehicle is stopped or moving slowly. Under the new fare, which will go into effect in early December, the meter will charge 40 cents a minute. The commission also set a $45 flat rate fare from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy International Airport, to mirror the flat fare in effect for trips from the airport to Manhattan.

  6. #66

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    October 26, 2006
    Manhattan: Increase in Cab Fares

    By WILLIAM NEUMAN
    The Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday unanimously approved a fare increase that will double the amount a passenger pays while a cab is stopped or stuck in slow traffic. The change amounts to an increase of approximately 11 percent to the overall fare. Taxi meters now charge 20 cents a minute while the vehicle is stopped or moving slowly. Under the new fare, which will go into effect in early December, the meter will charge 40 cents a minute. The commission also set a $45 flat rate fare from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy International Airport, to mirror the flat fare in effect for trips from the airport to Manhattan.

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

    New York Daily News
    Cab fare hike? Yes, just wait & you'll see
    BY IVAN PEREIRA and PETE DONOHUE
    DAILY NEWS WRITERS
    Thursday, October 26th, 2006

    Good thing Santa uses a sleigh.
    Just in time for the holidays, the Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday jacked up the cost of a cab ride - boosting the rate that passengers pay when cabs are stuck in traffic.
    The new fare scheme, expected to go into effect in December, will increase the cost of an average trip - 2.8 miles with about 5 minutes of so-called wait time - by about $1. Such a trip now costs $8.65.
    Cab riders were not in good cheer when told about the vote.
    "It's outrageous," said Kate Cardamone, 80, of the upper East Side. "It's already expensive to live in New York."
    Angie Hughes, 26, of Manhattan, said she's going underground.
    "I'll probably be taking the subway a lot more now," Hughes said. "It's not a good fare increase because the traffic here gets worse and worse, and everything is going up."
    But cabbies such as Leslie Destine, 60, from Brooklyn, said the higher fares are needed for them to make a decent living.
    "It's a good idea," Destine said. "With slow traffic I don't make that much."
    TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said the rate adjustment, as officials call it, is needed to ensure that a cabbie shortage doesn't develop.
    "An experienced driver is safer, and quite frankly, an experienced driver is one that serves better," Daus said.

    Here's the cost of a 2.8-mile trip under different traffic conditions and so-called wait times.
    Current fare scheme
    Wait time and fare
    1 minute ......... $7.90
    4.77 minutes .....8.65
    9.54 minutes .... 9.61

    New fare scheme with increased wait-time rate
    Wait time and fare
    1 minute ........... $8.10
    4.77 minutes ...... 9.60
    9.54 minutes .....11.52

    Calculations do not include surcharges or tips.



    HAIL $TORM OVER 'SLOW-TAXI' HIKE By JENNIFER FERMINO and JEREMY OLSHAN
    October 26, 2006 -- A New York minute just got a lot more expensive. That's because the Taxi and Limousine Commission yesterday doubled the cost of being stuck in traffic in a cab.
    Riders now pay 20 cents a minute for "wait time" - a price that hasn't changed in 16 years - but yesterday, officials voted unanimously to raise the rate to 40 cents a minute at a meeting in TLC headquarters.
    Adding insult to injury, the wait-time rate will now click in when a cab starts going less than 12 miles per hour. Currently, the rate takes effect at under 6 mph.
    Traffic experts say the average speed on avenues in Manhattan is 10.2 mph and on crosstown streets its 7.5 mph - meaning that most rides in the Big Apple will now be charged at 40 cents a minute.
    When the cab is moving faster than 12 mph, the rate will stay $2 a mile in increments of 40 cents per fifth of a mile. The hike to $2 a mile came in 2004, and was a 26 percent increase on the previous pricing scheme.
    The new rates mean that the average trip will go up by about a buck, according to TLC estimates.
    But some trips could jump much more.
    An average trip within Midtown - 1.13 miles with 6 minutes of idle time - currently costs $5.58, according to "The 2006 Taxicab Fact Book."
    At the new rate, the same trip would clock in at $6.80 - a 21.9 percent hike.
    A ride from Grand Central to Union Square - 2.19 miles - would jump just over 15 percent.
    TLC Chairman Matthew Daus said the hike, which is expected to go into effect in December, was about giving cabbies a better standard of living.
    "It's not easy to tell passengers that they are going to have to pay a little bit more," he said. But "we want to make sure that the drivers can make an adequate income."
    Drivers are now earning an average of $158 per shift, according to industry experts. If they put in five shifts a week, that already means $41,000 a year.
    And many cabbies might now opt to work extra shifts, Daus said.
    He predicted more cabs will hit the streets during rush hour - when it's notoriously difficult to hail a ride - because cabbies can make more money.
    The news of the hike was well received by drivers, who've long bemoaned the struggles of operating in one of the country's most costly and congested cities.
    "It's about time," said driver Erhan Tuncel. "Traffic has gotten worse, not better."
    Passengers, not surprisingly, disagreed strongly.
    "We're stuck in traffic and we're paying more?" said Tanya Mazyck, 41, of Queens. "This isn't fair - but this is New York and it's never fair. I'll definitely take less cabs."
    Shawn Obasi, 24, said he frequently takes cabs home to The Bronx after a weekend night in Manhattan. "I take cabs a lot, it's definitely going to affect me," he said. "That's a big difference."
    Edmundo Gallardo, 46, of Queens, said, "I know a lot of cabdrivers that make money. They complain about the gas but look at gas prices - they've gone down."
    Cabbies have been asking for a gas surcharge for a long time and were turned down. Yesterday's ruling may have been a way to compensate them.
    But Katherine Ramirez, 34, of the Upper West Side, said that with the city's usual gridlock, raising the cost of waiting made no sense.
    "It's insane. You know how much traffic there is in Manhattan," she said.
    But Ioannis Mentzas, 34, of Queens, said: "It's still cheaper than hailing a gypsy cab."
    In addition to the fare hike, the eight-member board also approved:
    * A flat fare of $45 on trips from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport. The rate previously applied only to trips from JFK to Manhattan.
    * A controversial move eliminating the requirement that cabbies demonstrate they are legal U.S. residents.
    They now will only have to produce their original Social Security card and a valid driver's license.
    "We don't have any business asking people if they are a citizen or not," Daus said.
    jeremy.olshan@nypost.com

    NEW YORK POST is a registered trademark of NYP Holdings, Inc.


    Cab fares go up

    By Sara Stefanini
    Special to amNewYork

    October 26, 2006
    Sitting in a yellow cab stuck in traffic will soon be more taxing on your wallet.

    With enthusiastic backing from taxi drivers and advocates, the Taxi and Limousine Commission unanimously voted Wednesday to double the amount charged on the meter when a cab idles, raising the cost of an average fare by about a dollar.

    Once the changes kick in, possibly in December, the meter will climb to 40 cents a minute when the car goes 12 miles per hour or less, instead of 20 cents a minute at 6 mph or less.

    Although taxi fares went up in 2004, this is the first increase on "wait time" since 1990. The increase will bring the average taxi fare without tips to $9.61 from $8.65, the commission said, with cabs earning $24 for an hour of wait time, instead of $12.

    The board also approved a flat $45 fare for cab rides from anywhere in Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, the same fee that already exists for trips originating at the airport.

    But even that new flat fee is in essence a hike, as the average cost of a trip to the airport from Manhattan now is $36 to $43, except for rides from Washington Heights, which average $46.

    "On behalf of 4,000 taxi drivers, thank you," David Pollack, executive director of the Committee for Taxi Safety, told the commission at Wednesday's public hearing.

    "Thank you for understanding the pressures taxi drivers go through sitting in traffic."

    Pollack noted that the new flat airport fare will encourage passengers to hail yellow cabs instead of using private cars or "gypsy" taxis, which people perceive to be cheaper but can charge up to $75.

    New York has the 15th highest average fare out of 23 American cities, according to Schaller Consulting, which researches urban transportation issues.

    When the commission last boosted taxi prices in 2004, the base price went up 50 cents to $2.50. When not idling, the meter charges 40 cents every one-fifth of a mile.

    The wait-time hike was necessary to compensate for higher gas prices, said Bruce Schaller, the Brooklyn-based firm's principal consultant, adding that several cities have also upped fares.

    Ehran Tuncel, a taxi driver, said the increase will also make cab rides safer because many drivers speed in order to keep the meter ticking.

    "It's about time, really," Tuncel said. "People always complain about reckless taxi drivers."

    Passengers' reactions Wednesday were mixed.

    Mike Puno, a Fordham University senior, didn't mind too much.

    "They're expensive already, in general, but for me a dollar isn't that bad," Puno, 21, said.

    Leslie Woody, 46, rolled her eyes when she heard the news.

    "That's crazy," said Woody, a funeral director who often takes taxis. "Knowing that, I'll take them even less."
    Copyright 2006 Newsday Inc.

  7. #67

    Exclamation Attention!....

    The taxi fare adjustment with the waiting time being increased to .40c per minute will take effect starting 12:01 AM, November 30th.. JFK flat rate of $45 will also apply to trips from Manhattan to JFK...

  8. #68
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    It's the little things that get you ...

    Quote Originally Posted by milleniumcab View Post

    The taxi fare adjustment with the waiting time being increased to .40c per minute will take effect starting 12:01 AM, November 30th ...
    TICKER SHOCK AT REAL TAXI HIKE

    PROMISED 11% BOOST GOES AS HIGH AS 27%

    nypost.com
    By MARK BULLIET and JEREMY OLSHAN

    December 1, 2006 -- Taxi riders saw red at every stop light yesterday as fare hikes up to 27 percent kicked in - after New Yorkers were promised they'd average only 11 percent.

    Most of the increase came from boosts in the amount cabbies charge for time they're at a dead stop or crawling.

    When The Post put the new fare to the test, a ride from Penn Station to the Metropolitan Museum of Art came to $18.50. The 5-mile, 29-minute midday trip would have cost $3 less the day before - an increase of nearly 20 percent.

    Passengers were hit even harder on trips closer to rush hour.

    It took 66 minutes to make the 8.7-mile journey from Lincoln Center to Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn during the afternoon, including 37 minutes of waiting time. Under new fare rules, the cost spiked $7.30, or 26.8 percent, to $34.50.

    The Taxi and Limousine Commission had said the increase would amount to only a buck for an average ride - or 11 percent.

    "I think it's horrible," said Lisa Navarro, who lives on the Upper West Side. "I think [drivers] are rude. I don't think they should get any more money."

    Candyce Kannengieser, a Long Island high-school teacher, said she wouldn't mind the increase if it came with better service.

    "Considering that the service hasn't improved, I don't really think it's fair," said Kannengieser, 34. "In fact, the service seems to have declined."
    "It's appalling, I hate New York cabs!" said Aisling McEvoy, 45.

    The Upper West Side mom said her ride from West 81st Street and Riverside Drive to Midtown used to cost $9 - but yesterday, it was $12.

    "If the service was good, it wouldn't be a big thing," said her husband, Eric McEvoy.

    Midtown resident Russell Keith, said, "What are you gonna do? It sucks. I've lived in Manhattan forever. I take cabs everywhere. It's an absolute outrage."

    Cabbies, on the other hand, saw green at every light.

    The said the change amounts to about a $50-a-day raise.

    "Wednesday I made $160," Harpal Chalal said yesterday, his third day driving a cab.

    "But today, I have already made that much, and I still have four hours left on my shift."

    Drivers have long complained that they lose big dollars in slow traffic and that the fare structure had a built-in incentive to be reckless and run red lights.

    "It's much safer," driver Eduard Tamarov, 41, said. "They should have done it a long time ago."

    Taxi officials say drivers will now earn about $24 an hour, whether they are moving or sitting in slow traffic.

    And though they weren't happy about paying more, some passengers said they couldn't really argue with the need for an increase.

    "I think it's a deserved price raise with insurance and gas prices going up," Neil Bond, 50, of White Plains said after paying his fare. Yesterday, cabs also started charging the same $45 flat rate on rides from Manhattan to Kennedy Airport that previously applied only on trips from the airport.

    Additional reporting by Tom Liddy

    Copyright 2006NYP Holdings, Inc.

  9. #69

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    Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it!

    I already didn't take cabs because of the cost when the subway is so ubiquitous and cheap. But hey, if you've got the cash, what's a 10-20-30% hike? Realistically, a 66 minute ride for $34 is not out of the question at all when you consider fuel, insurance, the cab, the driver, other supporting stuff. Hell, it is a bargain.

    But not as much of one as my $2* subway ride!



    *Good through May 2008.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by daver View Post
    Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it!

    I already didn't take cabs because of the cost when the subway is so ubiquitous and cheap. But hey, if you've got the cash, what's a 10-20-30% hike? Realistically, a 66 minute ride for $34 is not out of the question at all when you consider fuel, insurance, the cab, the driver, other supporting stuff. Hell, it is a bargain.

    But not as much of one as my $2* subway ride!



    *Good through May 2008.
    I agree. Besides, driving a cab has to be one of the toughest jobs in the city.

  11. #71

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    The POST was in the wrong cab for these sample fares..I would have saved them at least 15 minutes ( $3.00 ) to Grand Army Plaza..)))

    And the fare from Penn Station to the MET museum was never $15.50 so I find it hard to believe that it is $18.50 now... The distance from PS to MMoA is not 5 miles as they claim. It is more like 3 miles, maybe slightly more..

    Some reporting from the best BS paper in NYC.. Maybe they got to hire me and go at it again.)))

    To the NY Post Editor.....Get a life...... Sincerely, MC

  12. #72

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    One more thing; before this adjustment the meter made $12.00 waiting and $30.00 moving. Closing the gap to $24.00 to $30.00 evened the playing field for all cabbies. Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...Also they will be happier and serve better..

  13. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by daver View Post
    Party at milleniumcab's place, he's rolling in it!
    Even a person who doesn't take cabs is welcomed to my party, if I ever throw one....

  14. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by milleniumcab View Post
    Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...
    A good thing, as long as they don't overdo it. Where I live, most cabs are used by poor folk who don't have cars, so the cabbies poke along like hearses. Saves wear and tear on the cabs; consequently some are over twenty years old. The drivers act like geriatric cases.

  15. #75
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milleniumcab View Post

    Closing the gap to $24.00 to $30.00 evened the playing field for all cabbies. Most will slow down and make it a safer ride...

    Also they will be happier and serve better...
    And now they'll stop blasting their damned horns, too

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