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Thread: Burj Khalifa (formerly Burj Dubai) - by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

  1. #91
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The down-swing in NYC clubs / nightlife over the past 10 years -- particularly in Manhattan -- is greatly due to the gentrification of the areas where clubs used to thrive: LES, Tribeca, Hudson Square, west Hells Kitchen, Chelsea, SoHo. When residential use gets to a certain level residents have enough numbers to restrict opening / operation of clubs, etc. -- mainly due to the noise issues.

    It used to be that you'd see throngs of club-goers traveling up and down Broadway late into the night as they moved from one club to another. Same for 8th Street -- E. Village <> W. Village.

    Maybe now everybody stays home with their TIVO ...

  2. #92
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    well, it's a damn shame.

  3. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    When residential use gets to a certain level residents have enough numbers to restrict opening / operation of clubs, etc. -- mainly due to the noise issues.
    This can and should be addressed by zoning provisions. Folks moving into some districts should expect no recourse if the noise doesn't suit them. The city's big enough to accommodate everyone; we don't need the same rules in all places.

  4. #94
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy
    well, it's a damn shame.
    Agreed ... Glad I was around to see NYC with the rough edges exposed.

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    Never fear; with Suzanne Bartsch back partying, NYC nightlife will soon be saved from Paris Hilton and bottle service!

    http://nymetro.com/nightlife/features/15957/index.html

  6. #96
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Thanks TLOZ, for posting that article. i just finished reading it. Her parties really were a lot of fun back 'n the day. I'll have to stop by this party some tuesday night.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy
    Thanks TLOZ, for posting that article. i just finished reading it. Her parties really were a lot of fun back 'n the day. I'll have to stop by this party some tuesday night.

    Cool; let us know how it turns out when you go to one. I'd like to hear that there's hope yet

  8. #98
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Workers Riot at Site of Dubai Skyscraper

    By JIM KRANE
    Associated Press Writer
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates
    Mar 22 1:38 PM US/Eastern

    http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/03/22/D8GGPJJG3.html

    Construction on a skyscraper expected to be the world's tallest was interrupted when Asian workers upset over low wages and poor treatment smashed cars and offices in a riot that an official said Wednesday caused nearly $1 million in damage.

    The stoppage triggered a sympathy strike at Dubai International Airport, with thousands of laborers building a new terminal also laying down their tools, officials said.



    Some 2,500 workers who are building the Burj Dubai tower and surrounding housing developments chased and beat security officers Tuesday night, smashed computers and files in offices, and destroyed about two dozen cars and construction machines, witnesses said.

    The workers were angered because buses to their residential camp were delayed after their shifts, witnesses at the site said.

    An Interior Ministry official who investigates labor issues, Lt. Col. Rashid Bakhit Al Jumairi, said the rioters caused almost $1 million in damage.

    The workers, employed by Dubai-based construction firm Al Naboodah Laing O'Rourke, returned to the vast site Wednesday but refused to work.

    Crowds of blue-garbed workers milled in the shadow of the concrete tower, now 36 stories tall, while leaders negotiated with officials from the company and the Ministry of Labor.

    "Everyone is angry here. No one will work," said Khalid Farouk, 39, a laborer with Al Naboodah. Other workers said their leaders were asking for pay raises: skilled carpenters on the site earned $7.60 per day, with laborers getting $4 per day.

    A reporter inquiring about the riots was ordered to leave the site by an Al Naboodah manager who refused to give his name. The firm's business development manager, Jonathan Eveleigh, declined to comment when reached by telephone.

    Al Jumairi said the laborers were also asking Al Naboodah, one of the Emirates' biggest construction conglomerates, for overtime pay, better medical care and humane treatment by foremen.

    "They are asking for small things," said Al Jumairi, the labor investigator. "I promised them I would sit with them until everything is settled."
    Al Jumairi later said he was being diverted to negotiate with idled laborers at the airport.

    Labor stoppages in Gulf countries have recently become common, with some two dozen strikes last year in the United Arab Emirates alone. Most have centered on unpaid salaries and triggered a Labor Ministry crackdown on contract-breaching companies.

    The strikes and riots by Al Naboodah workers marred what otherwise appeared to be smooth construction of the Burj Dubai, which is to be a spire-shaped, stainless-steel-skinned tower expected to soar far beyond 100 stories.

    Emaar, the tower's Dubai-based developer, is keeping the final height a secret until the $900 million Burj is complete by 2008.

    A section of the tower is to host a 172-room luxury hotel operated by Italian fashion designer Giorgio Armani.

    The protesting workers are among almost 1 million migrants from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, China and elsewhere who have poured into Dubai to provide the low-wage muscle behind one of the world's great building booms.

    In five decades, Dubai has grown from a primitive town of 20,000 to a gridlocked metropolis of 1.5 million.

    &#169;2005 BREITBART.COM, INC.
    ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  9. #99
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    In five decades, Dubai has grown from a primitive town of 20,000 to a gridlocked metropolis of 1.5 million.
    That's nothing. Shenzhen, China (bordering HK) grew more than that in less than a decade, both in terms of population and skyline.

  10. #100

    Thumbs up Plans for the Dubai Metro

    I have recently been lookin at the plans for the new Dubai Metro, I was interested to know what people thouhgt about, yet another major development initiative aamongst many that Dubai is launching itself into. I know that at the moment, Dubai'd transport is veyr poor and you cannot practically travel without a car, hence the traffic jams, but would'nt it do more harm then good in the period of contruction. After all it will not be until 2017 that it will be up and running. That is a long time for more traffic congestion and chaos

  11. #101

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    Shenzhen, China (bordering HK) grew more than that in less than a decade, both in terms of population and skyline.
    Pfft, Shenzhen. Chongquing now has 32 million people.

    Dubai'd transport is veyr poor and you cannot practically travel without a car
    What amazes me about Dubai is that literally everything seems to have been built along Sheikh Zayed Road. An entire city on one street!

  12. #102
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Another unique aspect of Dubai is that 2/3 of the population (~1,000,000) are immigrants.

    Dubai Economic Boom Comes at a Price for Workers

    Morning Edition
    NPR
    March 8, 2006

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=5250718

    Dubai made headlines when a state-owned company moved to take over shipping terminals at six U.S. ports. The small Arab sheikhdom is one of the fastest-growing, flashiest and most cosmopolitan cities in the world. But foreign diplomats and others say there's a dark side to the economic boom, including millions of poorly paid construction workers, and illegal but widespread prostitution.

    In a bid to attract tourists, Dubai has opened the world's largest indoor ski resort, where children slide down ice chutes and adults slalom their way down a quarter-mile-long ski slope. It's the first some visitors from Dubai and other countries in the region have ever seen snow.

    The indoor ski resort is part of a much larger development boom that is rapidly transforming what used to be a small trading port for gold and pearls into a global center for international trade. Skyscrapers are under construction, soon to join the gleaming towers that already rise up out of the desert on the edge of the Persian Gulf. Developers tout manmade island networks -- some shaped as palm trees, others as continents -- just off the coast.


    Ivan Watson, NPR
    Clusters of new apartment and office blocks
    are under construction along a two-mile-long,
    manmade canal.
    Dubai residents often boast that their city currently
    has one-quarter of the world's construction cranes.

    Dubai and the rest of the United Arab Emirates won independence from Britain in 1971. Since then, Dubai's ruling family has carefully invested its share of the country's oil money into developing duty-free ports and infrastructure for tourism.

    Egyptian-born Youssef Ibrahim, a veteran Middle East journalist who has lived in Dubai for several years, says the city has "invented itself as a hub -- a hub for everything. A hub for airlines, boats. A hub for transient society that want to come for three, four, five years, make some money and go away. And as a hub, it is a successful enterprise."

    Dubai seems open to anyone who comes to make money. The result is a society in which the majority of the residents are foreign, coming from more then 160 countries around the world. Many foreigners find they can make several times the salaries they could back home, and living costs are relatively low.


    Credit: Mohamed Fadel Fahmy
    Cramped Quarters
    Construction workers from India relax in their room
    after being bused home from work.
    Construction workers typically live eight to a room,
    sending home a portion of their salary to their families,
    whom they don't see for years at a time.
    They are attracted by promises of good jobs, but the
    rising cost of living and exploitation by some unscrupulous
    employers have cut into their wages.

    But amid the high living, some foreign diplomats warn there is an often unseen dark side to Dubai. They say the city's economic miracle would not be possible without armies of poorly paid construction workers from the Indian subcontinent, most of whom are forced to give up their passports upon arrival in the U.A.E. Some workers say they haven't been home in years and that their salary has been withheld to pay back loans.


    Mohamed Fadel Fahmy
    Blue uniforms hang out to dry at a labor camp at the edge
    of the city.
    Armies of construction workers from the Indian subcontinent
    make an average of $150 a month.

    Another side of Dubai is technically illegal but widespread: prostitution.
    "It is a sin city," Ibrahim says. "They don't like this name, but they don't shrink away from the image, because it brings a lot of money."

    Islamist groups in the region object to Dubai's freewheeling lifestyle, but the emirate's ruler, Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, is famously apolitical.

    Perhaps this explains how Dubai has steadily prospered in the heart of a region plagued by violence and terrorism. But some locals privately wonder how long Maktoum's miracle can continue -- and whether his unique society would survive a major political or economic shock.

    Copyright 2006 NPR

  13. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by czsz
    Pfft, Shenzhen. Chongquing now has 32 million people.
    according to emporis chongquing has 6.3 million with no metro area at all.

  14. #104

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    The 32 million figure came from a report I saw on Deutsche Welle (German BBC). Wikipedia clarifies:

    The municipality of Chongqing has a population of 32,355,000 (2004), most of them living outside the urban area of Chongqing proper, over hundreds of square miles of farmland. The population of the urban area of Chongqing proper was estimated at 3.4 million in 2004, ranking approximately as the 10th largest urban area of China. Including the unregistered migrants from the countryside, the population of the urban area could be as high as 7.5 million.
    Suffice to say, though, that given Chongqing's growth, rural to urban migration patterns in China, and the vast countryside population near Chongqing, it has the capacity to explode. When the Three Gorges Dam is complete it will be the furthest navigational point on the Yangtze and the hub for China's entire interior West. This will be a China-scaled Chicago.

  15. #105
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    At the same time, though, Chongqing municipality is over 82,000 square kilometers -- roughly the size of the state of South Carolina.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chongqing

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Carolina

    The NYC CSA, meanwhile, fits 21 million people into just under 31,000 square km.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Metropolitan_Area

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