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Thread: Atlantic Yards Development - Commercial, Residential, Retail, NBA Arena

  1. #16

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    Notice the way tower 1 seems to float in the air above the stadium....I like it!



  2. #17
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    plan is awesome however if Ratner does not get the Nets will any of this happen

  3. #18

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    Thanks for the information. I guess is a good project. Very elegant which is a sort of thing not very common in Gerhy's architecture...

  4. #19

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    plan is awesome however if Ratner does not get the Nets will any of this happen
    Im afraid not. I dont even think Ratner owns the land that he hopes to build on. Purchasing the land is an unresolved issue with the MTA, it is one among many others. If Ratner does get the Nets he has vowed to build.

    Notice the way tower 1 seems to float in the air above the stadium....I like it!
    I believe all the buildings are design guidelines, such like Libeskind. I wouldn't even go as far as to say those are massing models. The stadium is a working design, as such it will create a measure for the super development.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6
    plan is awesome however if Ratner does not get the Nets will any of this happen
    Ratner has said that the development would move forward without the NETS, that the arena was just part of the plan. It would still make good sense, the residential units, the office space.......

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern
    Notice the way tower 1 seems to float in the air above the stadium....I like it!
    I believe all the buildings are design guidelines, such like Libeskind. I wouldn't even go as far as to say those are massing models. The stadium is a working design, as such it will create a measure for the super development.
    I believe you're right. But regardless of the design, the building would still rise above the arena as Gehry plans...more specifics at the website...
    http://www.brooklynhoops.net/

  7. #22

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    I actually went to the press release and took some pictures. Many more photos here: http://galleries.soaringtowers.org/gallery/albums.php





    I stopped by the site after the release and noticed all the buildings that would have to be torn down and I like this tan one.


  8. #23
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    Me too. I didn't notice it had to go.

  9. #24
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    What the hell is that?

  10. #25

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    Someone told me that they were study models for one of the office towers.

  11. #26
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    Oh hell no.

  12. #27

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    haha

    I actually like them though. They look like his NYT Tower design.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
    Oh hell no.
    Indeed. Gehry is definitely more suited to low-lying structures.

  14. #29

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    December 11, 2003

    A Grand Plan in Brooklyn for the Nets' Arena Complex

    By CHARLES V. BAGLI

    Slide Show: An Arena for the Nets in Brooklyn

    The developer Bruce Ratner unveiled his plans yesterday to build a Frank Gehry-designed arena for the Nets basketball team near Downtown Brooklyn. He detailed his ambitious $2.5 billion commercial and residential project at a theatrical presentation attended by the mayor, a former basketball star and a best-selling rapper.

    Whatever political juice and street credibility he gained from Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, the former Nets and Knicks legend Bernard King and the performer Jay-Z Mr. Ratner's presentation at Brooklyn Borough Hall was aimed mainly at the owners of the New Jersey Nets, who are selling the two-time Eastern Conference championship franchise.

    A group led by Mr. Ratner of Forest City Ratner Companies has the highest bid, $275 million. But the sale of the National Basketball Association team has gone through many twists over the last six months, and another round of bidding is in the offing. The news conference was also a response to rivals who questioned whether Mr. Ratner could deliver on his promises.

    Showing how pitched the battle will be, Gov. James E. McGreevey of New Jersey upped the ante after the Brooklyn news conference yesterday by saying that his state had secured $150 million to build a rail line to Continental Arena at the Meadowlands, the Nets' current home.

    Mr. Ratner has a track record with such projects, having built, among other things, the seven-million-square-foot MetroTech Center complex nearby in Downtown Brooklyn. For the Nets project, he has assembled a group of well-heeled investors with Brooklyn roots, including Vincent Viola, chairman of the New York Mercantile Exchange, and Jay-Z. (Forest City Ratner is The New York Times Company's partner in developing the new Times headquarters on Eighth Avenue in Manhattan.)

    Speaking of the Brooklyn project, Mr. Ratner said: "We are real. This is going to happen." He added, "If we don't get the team there will not be a project."

    Mr. Bloomberg lent City Hall's support to the project, saying, "We're rooting hard" for it to succeed.

    Outside the news conference, about two dozen residents distributed cookies in the shape of turkeys, an edible reference to their view of Mr. Ratner's proposal for the arena, office towers and apartment buildings. But the Brooklyn Borough president, Marty Markowitz, said the project would fill the hole left when the Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles after the 1957 season, a moment that he said still reduces him to tears.

    "Brooklyn is a world-class city, and it deserves a world-class team in a world-class arena designed by a world-class architect," he said. "This plan goes even further, creating thousands of apartments affordable to Brooklynites of every income and producing thousands of jobs."

    Mr. Ratner said his effort began after Mr. Markowitz called urging him to buy the Nets and move the team to Brooklyn. The 21-acre project centers on the Long Island Rail Road yards at the intersection of Atlantic and Flatbush Avenues. Under the proposal, the tracks for the train storage yard would be moved to the east, allowing the developer to build the $435 million, 19,000-seat arena for basketball, topped by a park with a running track that could be converted to an ice rink in the winter.

    The arena, which will be linked to the Atlantic Terminal subway and train lines, would be embraced by four tall office towers totaling 2.1 million square feet, with up to 4,500 apartments in buildings to the east.

    Rather than walling itself off from the community, Mr. Ratner and Mr. Gehry said, the arena would be sheathed in glass, allowing patrons a view of Brooklyn night life and passers-by a look at the interior.

    "This started with basketball, a Brooklyn sport," Mr. Ratner said. "This was always the site. But it became clear it was not economically viable without a real estate component. And Frank Gehry was the perfect architect for this site."

    Mr. Gehry, who designed the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Mighty Ducks hockey training facility in Anaheim, Calif., said he had never had an opportunity "to build a neighborhood from scratch in an urban setting."

    He said the renderings and models on display yesterday were merely the first steps in the designs. "Don't worry about these funny shapes at this point," Mr. Gehry said. "These are just blocks, and we'll make something out of it."

    Even some sports economists who have been critical of stadium and arena projects elsewhere are intrigued by Mr. Ratner's plans.

    "It has all the ingredients to be successful," said Prof. Mark S. Rosentraub, a sports economist and the dean of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University in Ohio. "It's a very attractive market. Add in the kind of housing that's being talked about and the retail opportunities, you have something that could work."

    Mr. Ratner said that the project "will be almost exclusively privately financed," although taxes derived from elements of the project will be diverted to help pay for it. The developer also wants the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to turn over some of its land and the state to condemn the rest of it. Only one block, he said, had apartment buildings, with about 100 residents.

    Mr. Ratner must also survive a grueling environmental review and community opposition.

    Despite the developer's pledge to conduct a public review, Patti Hagan, a member of the Prospect Heights Action Coalition, said she was "appalled by the secrecy surrounding the project." She questioned why the city was intent on giving Mr. Ratner exclusive rights to public property without a review.


    AN APPRAISAL

    Courtside Seats to an Urban Garden

    By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

    A Garden of Eden grows in Brooklyn. This one will have its own basketball team. Also, an arena surrounded by office towers; apartment buildings and shops; excellent public transportation; and, above all, a terrific skyline, with six acres of new parkland at its feet. Almost everything the well-equipped urban paradise must have, in fact.

    Designed for the Brooklyn developers Forest City Ratner Companies by Frank Gehry with the landscape architect Laurie Olin, Brooklyn Atlantic Yards is the most important piece of urban design New York has seen since the Battery Park City master plan was produced in 1979. The plan is contingent on financing, and on Forest City's acquisition of the Nets, the National Basketball Association team, to occupy the new arena.

    So what isn't contingent in Eden? Or in New York? I would say that the city's future needs urbanism of this caliber at least as much as this example of it requires the support of New York. Those who have been wondering whether it will ever be possible to create another Rockefeller Center can stop waiting for the answer. Here it is.

    The six-block site is adjacent to Atlantic Terminal, where the Long Island Rail Road and nine subway lines converge. It is now an open railyard. When decked over, the site will form an east-west corridor three city blocks long. The western end, terminating in a V at the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues, points toward Lower Manhattan.

    And, I might add, toward the future. Individual buildings can be useful barometers for measuring a changing cultural climate. But a large-scale urban development offers a different opportunity. Critical mass enables planners to rethink how communities want to live.

    Mr. Gehry has always said that his intention is to recapture traditional comforts and values, adjusting familiar forms and materials into unfamiliar relationships.

    It has been almost a quarter-century since Battery Park City was planned. In 1979, New York was still reeling from the fiscal crisis. The city's architects sought to recapture a sense of stability that they associated with the past.

    That outlook has by no means vanished. It is kept alive by local community boards for whom retro design signifies a means of preventing development from disrupting their lives. Yet this stagnant approach disturbs the continuity that results when succeeding generations accept responsibility for interpreting their relationship to changing time.

    Brooklyn Atlantic Yards reflects a city that has regained its faith in the future and no longer regrets its place in the present. Part of Mr. Gehry's genius is to synthesize and reimagine familiar elements of the existing cityscape. He has a sculptor's eye for the shapes of the skyline. He draws freely on the traditions of perimeter block building and of the garden city model.

    Because of triumphal landmarks like the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, Mr. Gehry's name has become virtually synonymous with the Wow Factor. The Brooklyn project will not disappoint wow-seekers. Most of the exclamation marks are packed at the western edge of the site. The design's most exceptional feature is the configuration of office towers surrounding the arena. This is dramatic urban theater, and a reminder that Wows were at the heart of Baroque urbanism.

    Instead of sitting isolated in a parking lot, the stadium will be tucked into the urban fabric, just as buildings surround a Baroque square. The arena becomes a stage, with the towers around extending the bleachers to the sky. Here, the stage will be activated by a running track around the perimeter of the arena's roof. In winter, the track becomes a skating rink. Other areas of the roof will be set aside for passive recreation. Restaurants for the surrounding towers are planned at the arena's roof level.

    There is also an "urban room," a soaring Piranesian space, which provides access to the stadium and a grand lobby for the tallest of the office towers.

    Mr. Gehry looked at many prototypes, in cities around the world, before sitting down to design. The goal here is warmth and intimacy: an ambition not easily reached in a room with a seating capacity of up to 20,000 souls.

    The massing models of the residential buildings will remind some observers of pre-Bilbao Gehry, when his vocabulary owed more to cubes than to curves.

    I hope we haven't seen the last of those big cube buildings. As I think the models show, they have a toughness that looks right for New York at this uncertain moment in time. And they work wonderfully well with the garden setting Mr. Olin has devised for them.

    The richness and generosity of the outdoor spaces he envisions are the urban equivalent of the fanciest flower arrangement a city could give to itself.

    We're worth it.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  15. #30

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    Thanks for the photos.

    Instead of sitting isolated in a parking lot, the stadium will be tucked into the urban fabric, just as buildings surround a Baroque square.

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