Page 4 of 244 FirstFirst 123456781454104 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 3648

Thread: Atlantic Yards Development - Commercial, Residential, Retail, NBA Arena

  1. #46

    Default Re: Displacing Communities

    Quote Originally Posted by jaybojohn
    The area around MSG isn't a residential neighborhood. So while DUMBO or Red Hook aren't necessarily the best areas right now, at least your not going to displace as many families and small business owners by tearing up the neighborhood to make way for an arena.
    I'm assumming you haven't been to Dumbo for a few years. There are almost no buildings there that aren't housing artists lofts, businesses or haven't been converted to luxury condos. Many many people would have to be displaced to make room for a big stadium. In fact, the major stadium would take up more than 1/2 the footprint of the neighborhood. :roll: It's not a big area. And it's developing very nicely, a stadium would be totally o out of charactor with the hood.

    And there's already a constant bottleneck of traffic between the BQE, the Brooklyn Bridge and the exit ramps from the BQE. Builiding another exit ramp wouldn't help, where would it come down? There's no space ther.

    Yes, there are the empire stores on the waterfront, which are mostly empty. But there are plans to convert them into cultural, educational and retail stores as part of the Brooklyn Bridge Park. (The plan is detail elsewhere on these boards.) And tearing those gorgeous buildings down would be a travesty.

    Maybe you mean vinegar hill or the brooklyn navy yard area? Still, the streets couldn't handle the traffic, they're only 3 or so lanes wide, and there's no subways at all.

    You may find empty space in Red Hook, and like Vinegar Hill and Brooklyn Navy Yard, there's no subway at all. No investor would pay to build a stadium where no one will be able come. Even real estate developers aren't that dumb.

  2. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by billyblancoNYC
    If people don't want to be "disrupted" or have everything around them never change, then they shouldn't live in a dynamic place like NYC. There is change all the time and it's part of life in a place that people want to live in, work in, play in, and invest in. It's a fact of life.
    What he said! What he said!

  3. #48

    Default

    Yet, Gehry's drawings were admittedly rough.
    Regardless Munch face reviews the still to be designed architecture.

    AN APPRAISAL
    Courtside Seats to an Urban Garden
    By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

    Garden of Eden grows in Brooklyn. This one will have its own basketball team. Also, an arena surrounded by office towers; apartment buildings and shops; excellent public transportation; and, above all, a terrific skyline, with six acres of new parkland at its feet. Almost everything the well-equipped urban paradise must have, in fact.

    Designed for the Brooklyn developers Forest City Ratner Companies by Frank Gehry with the landscape architect Laurie Olin, Brooklyn Atlantic Yards is the most important piece of urban design New York has seen since the Battery Park City master plan was produced in 1979. The plan is contingent on financing, and on Forest City's acquisition of the Nets, the National Basketball Association team, to occupy the new arena.

    So what isn't contingent in Eden? Or in New York? I would say that the city's future needs urbanism of this caliber at least as much as this example of it requires the support of New York. Those who have been wondering whether it will ever be possible to create another Rockefeller Center can stop waiting for the answer. Here it is.

    The six-block site is adjacent to Atlantic Terminal, where the Long Island Rail Road and nine subway lines converge. It is now an open railyard. When decked over, the site will form an east-west corridor three city blocks long. The western end, terminating in a V at the intersection of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues, points toward Lower Manhattan.

    And, I might add, toward the future. Individual buildings can be useful barometers for measuring a changing cultural climate. But a large-scale urban development offers a different opportunity. Critical mass enables planners to rethink how communities want to live.

    Mr. Gehry has always said that his intention is to recapture traditional comforts and values, adjusting familiar forms and materials into unfamiliar relationships.

    It has been almost a quarter-century since Battery Park City was planned. In 1979, New York was still reeling from the fiscal crisis. The city's architects sought to recapture a sense of stability that they associated with the past.

    That outlook has by no means vanished. It is kept alive by local community boards for whom retro design signifies a means of preventing development from disrupting their lives. Yet this stagnant approach disturbs the continuity that results when succeeding generations accept responsibility for interpreting their relationship to changing time.

    Brooklyn Atlantic Yards reflects a city that has regained its faith in the future and no longer regrets its place in the present. Part of Mr. Gehry's genius is to synthesize and reimagine familiar elements of the existing cityscape. He has a sculptor's eye for the shapes of the skyline. He draws freely on the traditions of perimeter block building and of the garden city model.

    Because of triumphal landmarks like the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, Mr. Gehry's name has become virtually synonymous with the Wow Factor. The Brooklyn project will not disappoint wow-seekers. Most of the exclamation marks are packed at the western edge of the site. The design's most exceptional feature is the configuration of office towers surrounding the arena. This is dramatic urban theater, and a reminder that Wows were at the heart of Baroque urbanism.

    Instead of sitting isolated in a parking lot, the stadium will be tucked into the urban fabric, just as buildings surround a Baroque square. The arena becomes a stage, with the towers around extending the bleachers to the sky. Here, the stage will be activated by a running track around the perimeter of the arena's roof. In winter, the track becomes a skating rink. Other areas of the roof will be set aside for passive recreation. Restaurants for the surrounding towers are planned at the arena's roof level.

    There is also an "urban room," a soaring Piranesian space, which provides access to the stadium and a grand lobby for the tallest of the office towers.

    Mr. Gehry looked at many prototypes, in cities around the world, before sitting down to design. The goal here is warmth and intimacy: an ambition not easily reached in a room with a seating capacity of up to 20,000 souls.

    The massing models of the residential buildings will remind some observers of pre-Bilbao Gehry, when his vocabulary owed more to cubes than to curves.

    I hope we haven't seen the last of those big cube buildings. As I think the models show, they have a toughness that looks right for New York at this uncertain moment in time. And they work wonderfully well with the garden setting Mr. Olin has devised for them.

    The richness and generosity of the outdoor spaces he envisions are the urban equivalent of the fanciest flower arrangement a city could give to itself.

    We're worth it.

  4. #49

    Default

    Muschamp is still a fraud IMO (I doubt this article would be as glowing had not a name like Gehry been associate with it) but I do agree completely with this quote.

    It has been almost a quarter-century since Battery Park City was planned. In 1979, New York was still reeling from the fiscal crisis. The city's architects sought to recapture a sense of stability that they associated with the past.

    That outlook has by no means vanished. It is kept alive by local community boards for whom retro design signifies a means of preventing development from disrupting their lives. Yet this stagnant approach disturbs the continuity that results when succeeding generations accept responsibility for interpreting their relationship to changing time.

  5. #50

    Default

    I think this says it all....by comparison, the meadowlands is no contest, no matter what fancy plans they cook up for the swamp...

    Instead of sitting isolated in a parking lot, the stadium will be tucked into the urban fabric, just as buildings surround a Baroque square. The arena becomes a stage, with the towers around extending the bleachers to the sky. Here, the stage will be activated by a running track around the perimeter of the arena's roof. In winter, the track becomes a skating rink. Other areas of the roof will be set aside for passive recreation. Restaurants for the surrounding towers are planned at the arena's roof level.
    I have to say, I LOVE IT!

  6. #51

    Default

    NY Times...

    Knicks May Need To Watch Their Turf

    By SELENA ROBERTS
    December 11, 2003

    ONE day, in about four years, James L. Dolan may be stirred from his narcoleptic leadership as Knicks chairman by a hired jostler on retainer at Madison Square Garden.

    "Excuse me, sir," General Manager Scott Layden may gently say to Dolan. "Sir, the Nets are at the door."

    Over the last couple of years, Dolan could dismiss the idea of a Nets threat to the Knicks' metropolitan domain as the Nets won games in a dank arena fit for vampires, "Hollywood Squares" stars and turnpike enthusiasts.

    He could watch out of the corner of his eye as the Eastern Conference champions failed to draw city fans as a result of repetitive traffic stress or Lincoln Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. He could assess the Nets' reach into the metro area as limited, given the distance in miles and the mystique between the Garden and the Swamp.

    As of yesterday, the gap closed, at least as a concept in cardboard. Unveiling his basketball fantasy at Brooklyn's Borough Hall, Bruce Ratner hyperdeveloper and charismatic bidder for the Nets offered his vision of a future when the Nets would play in an urban arena on Flatbush Avenue, in a cozy building surrounded by affordable housing, near multiple rail lines, with tickets that are affordable to the average fan.

    To give his dream tangibility, there was an elaborate mockup of the site made of paper and plastic, with building blocks from a toy chest to simulate skyscrapers and scaled-down fans the size of picture hooks glued to the landscape.

    To give his hope hip appeal, the bespectacled Ratner stood as square as a Chiclet when he introduced a new investor to his group: the rap artist Jay-Z. Given Jay-Z's Brooklyn roots, his mainstream appeal and his built-in attraction as a free-agent lure, he is a brilliant addition.

    "I believe there is a real passion for basketball in Brooklyn," Jay-Z said. "I believe with the kind of passion we have, an arena here could rival the Garden."


    If Ratner takes a quality Nets team to Brooklyn within four years, he would help reinvent the image of the franchise, taking it from a suburban lounge act to an urban group with edge. If the Knicks continue to top uninspired moves with mediocre ones, the Garden could morph into a graveyard where cool died years ago.

    The potential for this role reversal should unnerve Dolan, not that anyone would be sympathetic.

    "Who cares," said Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president, before adding that the Dolans would have to "deal with it" if the Nets moved into their backyard.

    Reflective of Dolan's cable-guy tendencies, Garden officials are hard to pin down on specifics between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Their answers on the Nets' possible relocation to their 'hood are broad and vague. On Tuesday, Garden executives declined to comment except to reiterate their confidence in the Knicks' brand identity.

    Haven't the Garden suits noticed? Brands are so yesterday. The hottest jerseys in the league are worn by a Cleveland Cavalier rookie (LeBron James) and a Denver Nugget phenom (Carmelo Anthony).

    If the Knicks need more proof of how shaky their identity could become if pitted against the Nets next door, they can examine the article in The New York Times yesterday that detailed how consumers are less likely to select gifts based on brand names than they were three years ago.

    Already, there are signs of the Knicks' market complacency. Almost every night, Marv Albert is turned into a carnival barker on MSG Network broadcasts, enthusiastically pitching ticket packages to fans who have abandoned what Michael Jordan once called basketball's Mecca.

    The Garden is not a must-see anymore, not at the inflated ticket prices, not with a deflated product on the floor. How long before the Knicks realize their glory days are over?

    Even delusions of grandeur can have an expiration date. In four years, the Nets could force Dolan into a reality check. So, there is time for the Knicks to do what they loathe (to rebuild) or make the bold moves they must (to revamp). So, there is a window for the Knicks to restore their credibility as The Team in town before the Nets swipe their turf. So, there is time for the Knicks to make themselves a worthy rival for the Nets should they cross the border.

    If the Knicks can compete with the Nets, if the Nets can maintain their run on success, Ratner's vision will be even grander than his cardboard design. Imagine what a subway would do for a Knicks-Nets series that meant something.

    "It would be exciting for everyone, and I think there is room for two great clubs," said Bernard King, a Brooklyn-born icon who played for the Knicks and the Nets. "There is certainly room in a borough like Brooklyn and a city like New York to accommodate two great franchises."

    First things first, though. Someone has to tell Dolan that his team would not be one of those elite right now. That's Layden's job.

  7. #52

    Default

    It sounds as if the press is on board, as if they had already bought season tickets for the Brooklyn Nets. Nothing's official, but the Jersey bid is already yesterday's news.

  8. #53

    Default

    New York Newsday:

    Plan for Nets Arena To Get Hard Review

    By Jamie Herzlich
    Staff Writer

    December 11, 2003, 7:18 PM EST

    The development firm looking to woo the Nets to Brooklyn has hired a top sports economist known for his skepticism about new arenas to study the impact of the project on the borough.

    Andrew Zimbalist, a professor of Economics at Smith College in Massachusetts, says he was hired two weeks ago by Forest City Ratner Companies. On Wednesday, developer Bruce Ratner unveiled a $2.5 billion proposal to build an arena and housing complex above the Atlantic Avenue rail hub in Fort Greene.

    Zimbalist, 55, is a noted expert on the impact of sports facilities. In 1997, he co-authored a book called "Sports, Jobs, and Taxes: The Economic Impact of Sports Teams and Stadiums." The book challenged the notion that teams and facilities benefit the local economy, and has been cited by opponents of new stadiums as an argument against public funding. Neighborhood actvists in Brooklyn are already linup up against the new arena, designed by noted architect Frank Gehry.

    But Zimbalist says the Brooklyn project is different because it would incorporate both residential and commercial components, including 4,500 housing units. " This is not a stand-alone arena," said Zimbalist. "It's a real estate development project."What's more, he said, the complex would be attracting a new team and new money to the region, instead of just rebuilding an arena for an existing team.

    Another difference he said is that in most stadium projects, public funding is fundamentally financing construction. Michele deMilly, spokeswoman for Forest City Ratner Companies, said this project would be "significantly financed privately." If there were any public funding, she said, it would come out of new revenues being generated by the project itself like sales and income tax revenues.

    For example, Zimbalist said, the Nets have a payroll of roughly $50 million. The players have to pay income tax to the State of New Jersey. "If they came to Brooklyn they would pay $5.5 million or 11 percent of their income to New York State and New York City," he said. If the arena hypotheticallyl took $4 million of public money to fund part of the project, the state would still end up netting a profit.

    That's chump change compared with the main obstacle: buying the Nets. Ratner is competing with a group led by New Jersey Sen. Jon Corzine and developer Charles Kushner, which would keep the Nets in New Jersey, and venture capitalist Stuart Feldman. Ratner's bid of $275 million leads the pack.

    Copyright 2003, Newsday, Inc.

  9. #54

    Default

    (STAR LEDGER)


    We don't need Nets, N.J. sports czar says
    State to look at ways to lure baseball team


    Friday, December 12, 2003
    BY GEORGE E. JORDAN AND MATTHEW FUTTERMAN

    With the threat of the Nets moving to Brooklyn growing more real by the day, New Jersey's sports czar said yesterday the state would start working on a plan to lure another basketball franchise or Major League Baseball team to the Meadowlands.

    "We are going to be just fine," said George Zoffinger, the chief of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority and Gov. James E. McGreevey's point man on professional sports. "This market is going to continue to be very attractive for hockey, basketball, even baseball."

    Zoffinger then fired a shot at New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who pledged his support Tuesday for a proposed $435 million arena in downtown Brooklyn that could become the Nets' new home.

    "New York can allow wealthy sport team owners to feed at the public trough if it wants to, but we are not going to do that," said Zoffinger, who has weaned the Meadowlands Sports Complex off millions in public subsidy.


    Jennifer Falk, a spokeswoman for Bloomberg, said the mayor was not using public money, and that "any contribution will have to be financed with taxes generated at the development."

    The trash talking came a day after the unveiling of a $2.5 billion Frank Gehry-designed arena, office and residential complex. It was the first major strike in a battle for the Nets that has become the latest skirmish between New York and New Jersey over professional sports. Wednesday afternoon, Zoffinger and Gov. James E. McGreevey unveiled their own plans for a $150 million rail link to the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

    The rail link, which could be completed by 2007, is part of a $1.3 billion plan to create a family entertainment and retail complex at the Meadowlands, which is also home to the Devils. The plan would give one of the state's most recognizable landmarks its most significant face-lift in 27 years.

    Zoffinger said the state would have plenty of options if the Nets leave.

    Plans include installing a $1 million system to convert the 20,000-seat Continental Airlines Arena into a 6,000-seat theater for smaller acts that want an intimate setting. Zoffinger also said the arena's location and the state's offer to finance a $120 million renovation might entice a basketball team to replace the Nets.

    Luring a Major League Baseball team to East Rutherford may be more daunting. Historically, MLB's relocation rules have prohibited teams from moving within 100 miles of an existing franchise unless the affected teams approve the deal. The rules were updated in 1999 to specifically name Bergen, Hudson, Essex and Union as counties where the Yankees and Mets could veto a third team.


    But Zoffinger said he has been told a team can move to the Meadowlands if three-quarters of baseball's owners approve it.

    "This isn't about trying to grab the Expos," he said of baseball's leading candidate for relocation. "This is about a long-term plan to make this an attractive place for baseball."

    The Nets are expected to be sold within 60 days. Bruce Ratner, the man behind the Brooklyn plan, has submitted the highest bid, $275 million. New Jersey developer Charles Kushner and U.S. Sen. Jon Corzine want to keep the team at the Meadowlands and have bid $267.5 million.

    On Wednesday, Ratner did not rule out raising his bid because the development hinges on acquiring the team. "We will get the team," Ratner said.

    Kushner has raised his bid once, but two associates said the New Jersey group was reluctant to go above $275 million.


    Ratner's investors said they can underwrite the Nets purchase price with revenue from 4,500 luxury residences and 2.1 million square feet of office space. Kushner, on the other hand, must make ends meet with conventional ticket sales, naming rights and luxury suites, his associates said.

    A committee of YankeeNets investors scrutinizing the bids is expected to select a winner within two months. Any change in ownership requires the approval of 75 percent of NBA owners, who want to see a solid plan to finance an arena something New Jersey has.

  10. #55

    Default

    "This isn't about trying to grab the Expos," he said of baseball's leading candidate for relocation. "This is about a long-term plan to make this an attractive place for baseball."

    I hear a Steinbrenner threat in the making if the YANKEES don't get a new stadium deal worked out in the not too distant future...

  11. #56

    Default

    December 12, 2003

    SPORTS MEDIA AND BUSINESS

    Developer Wants His Project, and Buying Nets Hinges on It

    By RICHARD SANDOMIR

    Bruce C. Ratner is not a superfan, but he wants the Nets, covets them so much that his company will not build a $2.5 billion downtown Brooklyn project, which features a glass-sheathed arena topped by a track and an ice skating rink, without them. Talk about incentive: no Nets, no minicity.

    "We're going to get the Nets in Brooklyn," Ratner vowed on Wednesday under the elegant domed ceiling of Borough Hall's old courtroom. To stress how much he needs the Nets, he banged his right fist on a lectern and said he would triumph over two rival suitors "if it's the last thing I do."

    Nets owners, one day removed from agreeing to break up YankeeNets, must be reassured to hear their team regarded as an object of great desire, as real estate play. Who could have imagined that a team with the Nets' vagabond history (with stops in Teaneck, Commack, Uniondale, Piscataway and East Rutherford) and mixed record would merit being the centerpiece of a 7.7 million-square-foot community?

    If we sell to Ratner, one can hear Nets owners say, we may pocket $300 million and our boys will play in an arena designed by Frank Gehry, not some standard sports architect, but a man who lived in Brooklyn briefly as a child and who designed the much-admired Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles.

    Soon after the Ratner Revue wound down in Brooklyn, Gov. James E. McGreevey of New Jersey added fuel to the interstate bidding during a news conference at Continental Arena.

    "I have great respect for Mr. Ratner, but he does not control the site for the arena nor the team," he said. "The Meadowlands represents arguably the premier site in the country. It's here. It exists. It's not a vision yet to be realized."

    McGreevey announced that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey would build a 1.9-mile rail link from the Meadowlands to New Jersey Transit's Pascack Valley Line, which would connect to the Secaucus Transfer Station.

    This sounds like dull infrastructure talk compared with GehryVision, but it is significant. The rail link would broaden access by public transportation to a renovated Continental Arena where the Nets would most likely play if Charles Kushner and Senator Jon S. Corzine of New Jersey buy the team and to the proposed $1.3 billion Xanadu entertainment, retail and commercial venture.

    A transportation strategy that doesn't congest highways would alter the Meadowlands, attract fans who have had no choice but to drive and perhaps lure New Yorkers who want to flee the odor of failure at Madison Square Garden.

    But the Brooklyn site is much more abundantly served by rail: it is a hub for nine subway lines and the Long Island Rail Road.

    The Meadowlands Makeover will happen with or without the Nets. Xanadu will be built. So will the rail spur. If they buy the Nets, Kushner and Corzine would have to pay for the renovation with revenue from new luxury suites and club seats.

    And Continental Arena, with wider concourses, greater fan comforts and more revenue sources, would still look like the pedestrian structure it has always been.

    The future domicile of the Nets may mean little to the owners, who have turned to Edwin H. Stier, a former federal prosecutor, to be their president and lead negotiations. As in most sales, the most important factors in choosing a buyer are the highest price and the ability to complete a deal.

    Ratner is the leading bidder, at $275 million; Kushner and Corzine are next, at $267.5 million; and last is Stuart Feldman, at $257.5 million. Feldman's motives are not known, although he has a charitable motivation to buy the team, similar to that of the Nets' principal owners, Raymond Chambers and Lewis Katz.

    The competition harks back to the 1980's tug of war over the Yankees (stay in the Bronx? go to the Meadowlands?) and to the departure of the Dodgers from Brooklyn to Los Angeles after the 1957 season. One difference is that on Wednesday, beside Ratner, bringing enthusiasm but carrying no bags of subsidies, stood Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg.

    Nearly half a century ago, the eternally reviled Walter O'Malley could not persuade Robert Moses, the city official crucial to building a ballpark for his Dodgers in the same area as the Nets' arena would be, to stand anywhere near him.


    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company

  12. #57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stern
    It sounds as if the press is on board, as if they had already bought season tickets for the Brooklyn Nets. Nothing's official, but the Jersey bid is already yesterday's news.
    I think Pataki & Bloomberg are gonna apply pressure to make this deal go through. It seems like a great dovetail into their plans for Downtown.

  13. #58
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    Ratner's confidence, as well as the Star-Ledger's article, are both very heartening. These are good days for Brooklyn.

    "New York can allow wealthy sport team owners to feed at the public trough if it wants to, but we are not going to do that," said Zoffinger, who has weaned the Meadowlands Sports Complex off millions in public subsidy.
    "Besides, we need that money to allow wealthy corporations to feed at our public trough."

  14. #59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    Ratner's confidence, as well as the Star-Ledger's article, are both very heartening. These are good days for Brooklyn.

    "New York can allow wealthy sport team owners to feed at the public trough if it wants to, but we are not going to do that," said Zoffinger, who has weaned the Meadowlands Sports Complex off millions in public subsidy.
    "Besides, we need that money to allow wealthy corporations to feed at our public trough."
    When do they decide between the bids?

  15. #60
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    Within the next 60 days.

Similar Threads

  1. Hudson Yards
    By Kris in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 1891
    Last Post: April 30th, 2017, 03:10 PM
  2. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  3. East 57th Street Tops Retail List Highest Rents In the World
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 30th, 2008, 12:33 PM
  4. Retail space banks are opening branches
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 14th, 2005, 02:43 PM
  5. Toy Store Is Leading Retail Shuffle in Times Square
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 15th, 2001, 08:51 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software