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Thread: New York is better than your city - deal with it

  1. #91

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    Classic Nick:

    "But that is an irrational fear that has no substance in reality"

    I said it was psycological.

    "but can't accept that the probability of dying on the New York Subway is far higer in relation to the London Underground."

    Please post where I say that. Thank you.

    "yet when he went on about ancestoral-Brits being cave-dwelling peoples"

    Please post where I "went on" about "ancestoral-Brits being cave-dwelling peoples"

    BTW: Any 8 year old could read that thread and understand the humour....but it all goes over your head.

  2. #92

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    BTW: Any 8 year old could read that thread and understand the humour....but it all goes over your head.
    This collection of threads could be a Monty Python skit.

    The Ministry of Monotone Tourism, across the hall from the Ministry of Silly Walks.

  3. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick-taylor
    What is wrong with using the 'hide online status' option? What relevance is this to proving your point?
    It was a joke, more directed at Marksix, given the two of you are on opposite poles about security vs privacy,

    I hope at least he gets a chuckle out of it.
    Any particular reason you hide your online status? I thought Marksix was the paranoid one.

  4. #94
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    I dont think someone posted this article before...


    California and New York City Most Popular Places People Would Choose to Live, According to Harris Poll on States and Cities in the U.S.


    Maybe it is the sandy beaches or perhaps the warm weather, but California, Florida and Hawaii are respectively the #1, #2, and #3 states that U.S. adults would choose to live in if they could live in any state in the country.

    And when it comes to Americans’ choices for cities, while the West may again be overrepresented, the ‘Big Apple’, New York City, comes in #1 for the sixth consecutive time as the U.S. city people would choose to live in or near.

    These are some of the results of a nationwide Harris Poll of 2,339 U.S. adults conducted online by Harris Interactive® between July 12 and 18, 2005.

    The next most popular states in which people would like to live are Colorado (#4), New York (#5), Arizona (#6), Oregon (#7), Texas (#8), North Carolina (#9), and Tennessee (#10). Since Harris Interactive last asked this question in 2003, there has been surprisingly little change in the top 15 states. Oregon moves from #11 to #7, Virginia drops from #9 to #12 and Tennessee re-enters the top 15 after falling out of the top tier in 2003.

    One interesting thing to note is that eight of the 15 states are in the West and six of them are in the South. New York is the anomaly, representing the mid-Atlantic region, and there are no states from the Midwest or Northeast in the top 15.

    Favorite U.S. cities to live in

    Following New York City’s lead as a top U.S. city people would choose to live in or near, the next four cities are all in the West – San Diego (#2), Las Vegas (#3), San Francisco (#4) and Seattle (#5). The Midwest makes the list with Chicago at #6 and rounding out the top 10 are Denver (#7), Honolulu (#8), Atlanta (#9) and Portland, Oregon (#10).

    Returning to the list of the 15 top cities this year are San Antonio at #14 and Nashville at #15. Nashville has not been in the top 15 since 2000. Interestingly, since Harris Interactive last asked the question in 2003, the cities from Florida that were on the top 15 list (Orlando, Tampa and Miami) have all dropped off, perhaps related to the 2004 devastation that occurred in Florida as a result of hurricane Ivan.


    http://www.harrisinteractive.com/har...ex.asp?PID=593 (There are charts in here)

  5. #95

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    "New York City, comes in #1 for the sixth consecutive time as the U.S. city people would choose to live in or near."

    Gee.... does Mike W know about this?

    Does FoxNews?

    And look! Faggy San Francisco at number 4.......

    and granola-munching, monorail-worshiping, gay-rights-preaching, church-shunning, flannel-wearing, book-devouring, vegan-dining, obsessively recycling, salmon-protecting, pinot noir-sniffing, latte-sipping, war-protesting, bluer-than-blue-voting Seattle at number 5!!!!!

    ---------------------
    Last edited by Fabrizio; May 4th, 2006 at 03:23 PM.

  6. #96
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Over a year old but is a good read...


    The town of the talk





    Feb 17th 2005
    From The Economist print edition

    WANDER into “Avenue Q” at Broadway's Golden Theatre and you can see the best current incarnation of an old New York favourite: a musical about the town that invented musicals. The show features a group of young hopefuls who are, for now, consigned by the city's high rents to a fictitious street in an outer borough. If today's twenty-somethings could afford a Broadway ticket, they would be nodding appreciatively.

    The story is also true to life in another way, which it may not have intended. Some of the characters are people, some are humanoid glove-puppets, and some are green or covered with hair. The real New York is not quite as ethnically diverse as that, but it is getting there. In the 1990s, immigrants flooded into New York in greater numbers and from more countries than ever before. The city's population has reached an all-time high of 8.1m, and a higher proportion of its people—over 36%—are foreign-born than at any time since the 1920s. Los Angeles and Miami have an even larger proportion of immigrants, but New York's are far more diverse. Over half of Miami's new arrivals are Cuban, and over 40% of Los Angeles' are Mexican. In New York, the Dominican Republic provides the biggest chunk of immigrants, with a share of 13%. China comes next with 9%, then Jamaica with 6%. No other country has more than 5%.

    The impact of these multifarious new New Yorkers is easily summed up. They saved the city, and they are helping to rebuild its neglected neighbourhoods. In the disastrous 1970s, New York lost 10% of its population and more or less went bankrupt. Without the influx of some 780,000 foreigners in that decade, things would have been much worse. And ever since then, immigration has helped New York to avoid the decline that beset most of America's other big old cities. Now immigrants make up 43% of the city's labour force, including over a third of its workers in finance, insurance and property, over 40% in education, health and social services, more than half in restaurants and hotels, 58% in construction and nearly two-thirds in manufacturing.


    Up and coming


    When The Economist last surveyed New York, in 1983, it said the city needed to strike more of a balance between rich Manhattan at its core and its four partly decaying outer boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island. Manhattan is still enormously wealthy. The residents of just 20 streets on the east side of Central Park donated more money to the 2004 presidential campaigns than all but five entire American states. But many of the most wretched neighbourhoods of 20 years ago—in south Bronx, central Brooklyn and Harlem—have seen a remarkable renaissance.

    Most immigrants live in the outer boroughs, two-thirds of them in Queens or Brooklyn, where they build businesses and often homes. Flushing in Queens, whose population is now nearly two-thirds immigrant, is a striking example. Poor and virtually all white in the early 1970s, the place is now Asian and flourishing. Across the city there has been a boom in housing construction. From the start of 2000 to July 2004, permits for about 85,000 new units were issued, almost as many as in the whole of the 1990s. And nearly half of all new housing in the past seven years is reckoned to be occupied by immigrants or their children.

    New York is once more where the young want to go, whether it is to take up a high-paying job on Wall Street, to study, or to vegetate on Avenue Q whilst figuring out which of the city's opportunities to aim for. New York University is now the most popular in America, according to a survey of college hopefuls by the Princeton Review in 2004. Its number of applicants for undergraduate courses more than doubled from 1995 to 2004. More graduates from America's top business schools go to New York than to any other city. For the less well-heeled, a little creativity may be required to pay the rent. At a subway stop on 57th Street, a student busker plays the “Godfather” theme with her saxophone held sideways like a flute, to accommodate a well-twirled hula-hoop. The effect is a pleasing vibrato.

    The city is bubbling with more conventional attractions, too. After a renovation project that cost $858m, the Museum of Modern Art unveiled its new building in November. It hiked its admission charge from $12 to $20 but is packed. A couple of weeks earlier, Jazz at Lincoln Centre opened its concert spaces, run by Wynton Marsalis, a jazz trumpeter, in the angular twin towers of the new Time-Warner Centre (TWC) at Columbus Circle. The TWC is the headquarters of Time-Warner, but also houses a shopping mall (the first real one in Manhattan, which is causing shudders), some of the most expensive apartments in New York and two restaurants where it would not be hard to spend $1,000 on dinner for two.

    Worlds away downtown, countless cheaper joints are jumping. According to Moby, a techno musician who owns a vegetarian restaurant on the Lower East Side, ten years ago there was nowhere in the area for bands to play. Now there are if anything too many venues. With at least 850 bars and clubs all over the city, the competition can be fierce.

    One big reason why New Yorkers have been able to rescue their neighbourhoods, attract people and smarten up the city is a dramatic fall in crime, which began in the 1990s and continues apace. Once notorious for its threatening streets, graffiti-covered subways, drug-addled hobos and general air of menace, New York today—as its businessman-mayor, Michael Bloomberg, rightly never tires of saying—is the safest big city in America. Now that New Yorkers are comfortable lolling on the sidewalks, eating outside and moving around the city, the trend is self-reinforcing. They have reclaimed their streets.


    Street smarts


    Rudy Giuliani, who was mayor in 1994-2001, is usually given the credit for transforming the city with his introduction of “zero-tolerance” policing. He did indeed demonstrate that crime can be driven down and kept down. He showed that the city was manageable, which was a great legacy to leave. But the conquest of crime did not happen quite as New Yorkers think they remember it. The virtuous cycle was started when David Dinkins, a black former mayor who is now rarely credited with anything, raised taxes to hire thousands more police in 1990-93 and crime began to drop. And it was Mr Dinkins's police commissioner, Ray Kelly—now back in the job again under Mr Bloomberg—who began the campaign to stamp out windscreen-washing “squeegee men” and other minor annoyances before they turned into something nastier. It helped, too, that the city's crack-cocaine epidemic was ending anyway in 1991.

    From the late 1960s to the early 1980s, films showed the world that New York was steeped in sleaze and violence. The image of the city portrayed in “Midnight Cowboy”, “The French Connection”, “Death Wish”, “Taxi Driver” and “Fort Apache, the Bronx” took time to fade. But in the 1990s three yawningly peaceful sitcoms broadcast a very different picture of the city, supplanting menace with safer kinds of urban adventure. They were tinged with just enough hedonism and cynicism to attract young people without risking their parents' disapproval. The three are “Friends”, in which nothing happens, “Seinfeld”, in which even less happens, and “Sex and the City”, where plenty happens, but usually to someone else.

    “Sex and the City” stars four young career women and is ostensibly about the difficulties of finding a man in New York. It has a point. According to an analysis for The Economist, there are 93 men to every 100 women among single New Yorkers aged 20-44. In the country as a whole, and in most other big cities, there are more young single men than young single women. What the programme mostly shows, though, are the joys of chatting, shopping and going out to glamorous places. The six young friends in “Friends” are poorer and don't have quite the right invitations. They hang out together, discuss who is hanging out with whom, then hang out some more. “Seinfeld” is about a self-satisfied comic who occupies himself by being mildly witty about the trivial frustrations of urban living and his eccentric neighbours.


    Volume, mass and destiny


    All three programmes show New York as essentially one big conversation, which is why they reflect and sell it so well. For this is the town of the talk—a town of irrepressible boosterism somehow combined with deprecating and ironic Jewish humour, of endless argument and opining, of making deals, exchanging ideas and remaking lives through meetings that seem pure chance but are inevitable given the city's buzzing density. Manhattan's confined grid of streets packs together not only the 1.5m people who live there but also 2.4m jobs, and the lion's share of the city's huge number of visitors. As the capital of the nation's media, it is the place where America talks to itself. Most of the news networks and late-night talk shows, the two almost-national quality papers, the news weeklies and the book publishers are here. Discourse and intercourse—in the broad sense of that word—are the essence and the comparative advantage of New York. This survey will argue that the jobs which thrive here are those that require or exploit the interaction of people jammed together.

    Yet density brings a small risk of great danger. New York is a strikingly healthy place to live, and was so long before Mr Bloomberg began to wage a war on smoking in 2002. Partly because there is no room for many cars—so New Yorkers are highly unlikely to be killed by them, and take more exercise—New York has the lowest mortality rate of all but three of America' s 46 biggest cities. But, as the journalist and author E.B. White pointed out long ago, the highly concentrated splendour of New York also makes it a tempting target for any “perverted dreamer” with the power to “loose the lightning of annihilation”. With what now seems like chilling prescience, in 1948 he wrote:

    A single flight of planes...can quickly end this island fantasy, burn the towers, crumble the bridges, turn the underground passages into lethal chambers, cremate the millions. The intimation of mortality is part of New York now: in the sound of jets overhead, in the black headlines of the latest edition.

    Three-and-a-half years after New York's blackest headlines, the island fantasy is evidently far from ended. Jobs are growing (just), Wall Street bonuses are up, and last year there were more visitors than before the attacks. But then the numbers killed were not the millions White envisaged; he was thinking of nuclear bombs.

    Leave out the passengers and crew on the aeroplanes that were flown into the World Trade Centre, and about 2,600 people were killed in New York on September 11th 2001. Put that tragic number in perspective, and you can perhaps see how it is possible for New York to be a powerful magnet for talent, youth and energy once more. In 1990 there were 2,290 murders in the city; last year there were 566. Thus even if a September 11th were to occur every other year, the city would by one measure be quite a lot safer than it would be with crime at its 1990 level and no terrorism.


    Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2006.

  7. #97

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    "New York City, comes in #1 for the sixth consecutive time as the U.S. city people would choose to live in or near."

    Gee.... does Mike W know about this?

    Does FoxNews?

    And look! Faggy San Francisco at number 4.......

    and granola-munching, monorail-worshiping, gay-rights-preaching, church-shunning, flannel-wearing, book-devouring, vegan-dining, obsessively recycling, salmon-protecting, pinot noir-sniffing, latte-sipping, war-protesting, bluer-than-blue-voting Seattle at number 5!!!!!

    ---------------------
    i hope that homophobia was ironic.

  8. #98
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Yeah... I hope it was a mistype and he meant 'Foggy San Francisco' (cause many times it is foggy in that city) instead of 'Faggy San Francisco' (cause there is a big gay commnunity there) Cause the latter is not a very good word to use.

  9. #99

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    ^ Oh, come on guys, lighten up.

  10. #100
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Let me post this here aswell...


    In record numbers, city's residents say they `love' New York


    BY KIRSTEN SCHARNBERG
    Chicago Tribune
    Mon, Dec. 26, 2005

    NEW YORK - Everyone has seen them: the "I heart NY" T-shirts that tourists buy on their first visit to the Statue of Liberty or Times Square or the Empire State Building.

    It turns out that New Yorkers themselves should be wearing the upbeat - if uncharacteristically unstylish - apparel.

    A long-running poll that gauges New Yorkers' attitudes toward their frenetic, often maddening metropolis recently found that 61 percent "love" their hometown, the highest percentage in poll history. "This is an honest-to-God love affair, not just a casual affection," said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute in Connecticut, which has conducted the poll since 1994.

    Just four years after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, when many predicted that hundreds of thousands of residents would flee New York and that those who stayed would never feel quite the same about a place now universally seen as a terrorism target, the poll found that just the opposite has occurred.

    In addition to the 61 percent who say they love the Big Apple, another 22 percent say they "like" New York. Fifteen percent have mixed feelings, and only 2 percent describe their feelings toward the city as "dislike" or "hate."

    "Why doesn't that 1 percent of haters just move back to Boston?" Carroll quipped.

    The numbers have not always been so rosy for New York.

    In 1999, just 46 percent of residents said they loved their city. Even more stark: When asked in 1994 how satisfied they were with "the way things are going in New York City today," just 3 percent said they were "very satisfied." That number in the latest poll is 19 percent, with another 56 percent saying they are "somewhat satisfied."

    New York has long been a place that some outsiders love to hate. The people are too rude, they say. The pace is too hectic. The prices are too out of control.

    Indeed, there have been years when even the most devoted residents of America's largest city had a hard time disagreeing with some criticisms - in the 1970s when the city almost went bankrupt, in the 1980s when crime was sky high and in the 1990s when the cost of living soared. In fact, at the turn of the millennium, the average cost for a home in Manhattan topped $1 million.

    But a stunningly successful 1977 advertising campaign - the launch of the "I heart NY" slogan - has proved to be a timeless refrain among even those New Yorkers who occasionally grow frustrated with the place they call home, who critique it and its leaders, who grumble about pollution and who put up with disruptions like last week's three-day transit system strike.

    "Listen, New Yorkers are realists," said former New York Mayor Ed Koch, who was elected to the post the same year the advertising slogan was introduced. "They know New York is not the most architecturally beautiful - that's Paris. They know it's not even the most interesting - that's London. They know it's not the cleanest - that's probably Chicago. But what distinguishes us is the electricity of New York."

    Yet electricity alone can't explain the numbers found in the latest Quinnipiac poll. Electricity might lead to lust - passionate, short-lived lust - but not the deep love that 61 percent of residents profess.

    The breakdown in the numbers also reveals that feelings for New York spanned gender, ethnic and political boundaries. Fifty-seven percent of Republicans and 62 percent of Democrats said they loved the city. Sixty-one percent of whites, 55 percent of blacks and 66 percent of Hispanics felt the same. Fifty-seven percent of men said they loved New York, compared with 64 percent of women.

    "What's interesting is that this is a cross section of people both ethnically and socioeconomically," said Stanley Renshon, a New York psychoanalyst and professor of political science at the City University of New York. "This is not just Donald Trump saying he loves New York. It's Mr. and Mrs. Jones. It's Mr. and Mrs. Gonzales. It's Mr. and Mrs. Ling."

    So from a psychoanalyst's perspective, what about a place can make people feel so strongly for it that they describe their feelings with a word often reserved for only the most important things?

    Sept. 11 certainly plays a part, Renshon said. They love a city that has endured, a city that has persevered.

    And, paradoxically, the very difficulties associated with life in New York - the struggle of finding a cab during rush hour, the sharp-elbowed sidewalks, the constant racket from the streets when trying to sleep at night - make people love it, the doctor said.

    "That whole `If you can make it here you can make it anywhere' song lyric," Renshon said. "They take pride in making it every day, and that makes them feel good not only about themselves but about the place."

    But most of all: New York seems to be a city on the rise.

    The weekly wage of workers in Manhattan rose 5.8 percent in the first quarter of 2005, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics. The city has had nearly a decade of declining crime rates, and the number of homicides has been more than halved since the early 1990s. Drug dealers and porn shops are no longer the staple fare of Times Square.

    "This used to be a pretty rough town to live in," Renshon said. "It's no fun to worry that you can't get back to the bus stop after work without getting mugged. But people see how much safety has improved, how the economy is doing, how much the city has been cleaned up. They love a place that is clearly trying so hard to be better."

    At a little street stand on Canal Street, in the heart of New York's teeming Chinatown, Mei Liu was selling the famous "I heart NY" T-shirts earlier this month. It was a cold day and she did not have many customers, but she folded and refolded her wares, making the display orderly and appealing.

    "These are very nice shirts," said Liu, 36. "It is a very nice city. My life is better here than it was in China. My children's lives are better."

    As Liu spoke, two taxi drivers nearly collided on the corner. One began screaming obscenities at the other. Liu just laughed.

    "Most days, very nice city," she repeated.


    © 2005 KRT Wire and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

  11. #101
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime
    Yeah... I hope it was a mistype and he meant 'Foggy San Francisco' (cause many times it is foggy in that city) instead of 'Faggy San Francisco' (cause there is a big gay commnunity there) Cause the latter is not a very good word to use.

    JESUS CHRIST!!!

    Have you guys even read the entire thread, or were you all waiting for him to say something YOU could object to!

    HE WAS BEING SARCASTIC AND IRONIC!!!!

    He was using all the labels that neo-cons use as disparaging to describe areas that people around the world just voted as the places they all wanted to live in or around!

    "Not a very good word to use". SHEESH!

  12. #102
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    ^ YES... I understand what he was trying to say... I apologize to Fabrizio if he thinks I was been defensive.

  13. #103
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    ironmike: You dug up that post by Tonina from 2.5 years ago!

    Chances are this one has left the city and the forum, so don't be expecting to get the explanation you're seeking from the horses mouth.

  14. #104

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    You guys don't need to convince me. While I've had my eyes vaguely set on moving to NYC ever since college, I think it was my girlfriend (incidentally, from New Jersey) who has succeeded in convincing me what a colorless dump Columbus, Ohio is. I actually loathe my city now—if there's any one reasonable-sized city that NYC is absolutely 100% better than, it is my hometown, from what I've seen. Especially for one of an artistic-creative bent like me. Right now, except for a few bright spots, this place is a vanilla dungeon.

    I admit, I'm still rather sensitive and defensive when my gf disses my town--it may be a $#!thole, but it's my $#!thole--and the fact that she has to live here, but ultimately I have to agree with her.

    (Now I just worry that I'm going to be too old to get the full experience by the time I can make save up enough cash to actually move there. Is, say, 35 or 36 too old to make the move? Stupid question, I know...)

    cheers

    Billy S.

  15. #105

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    Quote Originally Posted by moogyboy
    ...what a colorless dump Columbus, Ohio is.
    Colorless, that is, except for

    SCARLET

    and

    GREY

    It's gotten to where I want to throttle someone every time I see that color combination, or hear some moron shout "Go Bucks!" And I'm an OSU alum. Gotta move, gotta move, gotta move...

    cheers

    Billy S.

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