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Thread: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

  1. #16

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    ^ So what can you tell us about the re-do?

  2. #17
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And clandestine shots of on-going construction will be greatly appreciated (and your efforts rewarded).

  3. #18

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    It is the single greatest museum in the world in my humble opinion so I have to say this museum is what makes New York City great.

    MOMA is fantastic if you like paint drippers and canvas urinators but if you want real artists and real treasures of the ancient world and throughout history, you cant beat the Met.

    Anyone see the Mexican gods exhibition there recently? Fascinating.

    The Met is also taking steps to return items that have now been proven to have been stolen or misappropriated to their rightful owners (but with some obvious pains). I suppose that many items in museums should properly be elsewhere.

    One thing that struck me in the British Museum was the Rosetta Stone.

    Also in the British Museum I saw the Elgin Marbles. What's that you say? Well I was amazed when I saw it. It looked like the friggin roof of the Parthenon to me, you know, that building in Greece. It consists of the Pediments and Metopes and (the whole sides of the roof and the front and back triangular shaped parts)

    I dont know why they call it the Elgin Marbles when they should just name it "Here Lies The Roof of the Parthenon Which We Stole from the Roof of the Parthenon".

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Tenenbaum View Post
    "Here Lies The Roof of the Parthenon Which We Stole from the Roof of the Parthenon".
    At least it's out of the [acid] rain.

  5. #20
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    I wonder if anyone well versed in architecture can help me with this question - on top of the 4 corinthian columns on the front of the Met there are rough hewn blocks, arranged in a haphazard pyramidal shape. Is this a sign of an unfinished flourish, or is something common to classical / neo classical buildings (the only think I could think is that perhaps the blocks act as some type of counter balance)

  6. #21
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    They were originally intended to be sculptures.

    The overall designs were so ambitious and costly, that several of the elements initially proposed by Hunt were not ultimately approved or completed, the most noticeable example of this being the four massive blocks of stone that sit atop the columns flanking the Museum's main entrance. Hunt's intention was that these should be carved, by four different sculptors, into groupings representing the "four great periods of Art" – ancient art (Egyptian), classical art (Greek), the Renaissance, and modern art. When the plans to carve the blocks were dropped, the stone was not removed because its bulk and weight were deemed necessary to balance the façade as an architectural design. Despite the simplification of Hunt's original concept, the façade was nevertheless hailed at its inauguration in 1902 by one newspaper as "the most monumental example of architecture in America" and by a prominent architect as "the best classic building in the country."

    http://www.metmuseum.org/press_room/...31F3ED2D26D%7D

    http://www.nyc-architecture.com/UES/UES074.htm




  7. #22
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    many thanks, NYatKNIGHT - great links.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The rough hewn blocks are such a great part of the facade -- a vast improvement on the idea of carved statues IMO -- A touch of Primitivism / Modernism to offset the Classicism.

  9. #24
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    Is there a better museum in the world? Any thoughts?

  10. #25

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Punzie View Post
    Director (and Voice) of Metropolitan Museum to Retire

    Philippe de Montebello, Retiring Director
    (Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times)


    What are the changes of me seeing this man at
    Metropolitan Museum? Kind of a dumb question, but I was just curious.

    Thanks.
    ben

  12. #27

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    ^ No harm in trying. What would you say to him?

  13. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    ^ No harm in trying. What would you say to him?
    Well, I'd probably start by saying "Hi." I'm not sure what I'd say after that. I need to do my research on both him and the museum before I leave.

  14. #29
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    Must see is the Etruscian Chariot on the second floor of the Roman exhibit, amazing to see such a preserved peice from that era

  15. #30
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Ciao to a Met Prize Returning to Italy


    Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times
    Visitors at the Metropolitan Museum viewing the Euphronios krater.

    NY TIMES
    By CAROL VOGEL
    January 11, 2008

    Inside Art

    In the coda to a long tug of war, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is bidding goodbye to the Euphronios krater, a 2,500-year-old vessel that has been a showpiece of its collection for more than three decades. Sunday is the last viewing day.

    The krater, a Greek bowl for mixing water and wine, will be sent to Italy as part of an agreement reached nearly two years ago with that country’s government, which has long contended that the artifact was illegally excavated from a tomb in Cerveteri, near Rome. The Met bought the krater in 1972 for $1 million from Robert Hecht, an antiquities dealer who is now on trial in Rome on charges of conspiring to traffic in looted artifacts. (Mr. Hecht denies the charges.)

    Under the terms of the pact, the Met is returning 21 objects that Italy said were looted, and the Italian government is lending the Met a series of rare ceramic antiquities. The first arrived in late 2006, and three more are to be installed by Wednesday in the Met’s Greek and Roman galleries.

    Two of the newly lent pieces have direct connections to the krater, which was painted by the Greek artisan Euphronios. A 26-inch-wide terra-cotta cup depicting an assembly of the Greek gods on Mount Olympus is signed by Euxitheos, a potter who also signed the Euphronios krater. A jug shaped like a woman’s head was made by the potter Charinos, who is believed to have worked in Euphronios’ workshop.

    The third piece of ceramic art going on display next week, a krater made in southern Italy during the fourth century B.C., is decorated with a spoof of one of the most serious episodes in Greek drama: Oedipus solving the riddle of the Sphinx.

    The departing krater is to go on view later this month at the Quirinale, the presidential palace in Rome, where a show of other objects repatriated from foreign museums opened last month.

    In a telephone interview on Thursday, Philippe de Montebello, the Met’s director, praised the quality of the loan to the Met. “At the time during which the negotiations were under way, I brought a list prepared by the curators of the kinds of things we considered equivalents,” he said. “We expected one object, but got three very beautiful objects. It shows on what a firm footing our future collaborations with Italy will be.”

    Mr. Montebello, who on Tuesday announced his retirement later this year, was asked whether he felt particularly emotional about the krater’s departure.

    Speaking from a cellphone, he said, “I can’t hear you anymore” — a response he has occasionally deployed by land line to questions he would rather not answer.


    Metropolitan Museum of Art
    Sunday is the last chance to see the Euphronios krater
    at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    A RARE PRAYER BOOK

    The only known copy of the first Book of Hours printed in France, a tiny volume nearly 5 inches tall and 3 inches wide, has been acquired by the Morgan Library & Museum. Designed to fit into the palm of a woman’s hand, the book of prayers and devotional readings is illustrated by more than 40 woodcuts depicting religious figures and the life of Jesus.

    “They are less sophisticated illustrations than later examples of Books of Hours,” John Bidwell, the Morgan’s curator of printed books and bindings, said.

    At the Morgan it joins one of America’s most notable collections of such prayer books: 240 manuscripts and about 130 printed versions of the Book of Hours. The title reflects the organization of the devotional readings, chosen for different times of day.

    This volume is the first known book to have been produced by the French publisher Antoine Vérard, and it helped establish Paris as a leading publishing center.

    “The French eventually made these medieval best sellers,” Mr. Bidwell said.

    The Morgan paid $471,304 for the Book of Hours in November at Sotheby’s in London, where a German library was auctioning it. A grant from the B. H. Breslauer Foundation, established after the death of the New York antiquarian bookseller Bernard H. Breslauer in 2004, covered the cost.

    Mr. Breslauer once owned this very volume, having discovered it at a Christie’s auction in 1966. “Breslauer was the first to recognize its importance,” Mr. Bidwell said. “At the time there had been no scholarship whatsoever on this Book of Hours.”

    Scholars realized it was from 1485, about five decades after Gutenberg invented movable type. But it was Mr. Breslauer who, by sorting through bibliographies, determined that it was the first Book of Hours printed in France.

    “Every few months the Morgan rotates its holdings of rare books and manuscripts,” Mr. Bidwell said, “and this one will be on display in April for about three months.”

    EXTRA ART AT THE ARMORY

    When the Art Dealers Association of America sets up its annual Art Show in February, there will be more to see at the Park Avenue Armory than the paintings, drawings and sculptures being sold by the organization’s members.

    Three site-specific projects by emerging artists are planned for the historic first-floor rooms of the landmark building, on Park Avenue between 66th and 67th Streets.

    The contemporary projects fit in with the armory’s effort to attract a new and younger audience, and they will be on view to the public at no charge. (It costs $20 to enter the Art Show, which runs from Feb. 21 to 25 and benefits the Henry Street Settlement.)

    “We thought it would be nice to enhance the initiatives at the armory and broaden the perspective of the Art Show,” said Roland Augustine, a Chelsea dealer who is president of the Art Dealers Association of America.

    Mr. Augustine is also a trustee of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y., where Tom Eccles, the armory’s artistic adviser, is director of the Center for Curatorial Studies. The three artists chosen for the armory project all have Bard affiliations.

    Spencer Finch, an artist who explores relationships between light and color, is collaborating on an installation with Trevor Smith, the center’s curator in residence. Lisi Raskin, an artist in residence at Bard, plans to create a militarylike installation, centered on the idea of surveillance. Pietro Roccasalva, an Italian artist from Milan, is collaborating with a Bard student to present a performance-based piece.

    Art students in Bard’s graduate program will contribute as well, creating a video installation for the armory’s first-floor hallways.

    RECRUITING AUCTION STARS

    Spring may seem far away, but the clock is ticking fast for the New York auction-house experts assembling the May auctions of important fine art.

    Christie’s has secured a small collection of Abstract Expressionist works for its May 13 sale. The top work is a Mark Rothko painting from 1952 with rich reds and yellows, titled “No. 15” and estimated at around $50 million.

    “This is exactly what the market is desperate for,” said Brett Gorvy of Christie’s postwar and contemporary art department worldwide. Describing what is most desirable in a Rothko, Mr. Gorvy said, “It’s the best year and perfect scale: 90 inches by 77 inches.”

    Dealers and collectors who follow the Rothko market will recognize the image. Sotheby’s sold it in November 1999 to an unidentified telephone bidder for $11 million, then a record price. Christie’s will not name its current seller, but experts say it is Roger Evans, a San Francisco collector.

    Mr. Evans, a loyal Christie’s client, has sold other works at auction recently, including Andy Warhol’s “Orange Marilyn,” which he parted with in November 2006 for $16.2 million. And Christie’s is offering two other works from Mr. Evans’s collection in May: Sam Francis’s “Black,” from 1955, expected to bring $4 million to $6 million, and an untitled Adolph Gottlieb painting from 1960, estimated at $1.5 million to $2 million.

    To secure the property, Christie’s gave Mr. Evans a guarantee — an undisclosed sum that it will pay him regardless of the sale’s outcome — that is believed to be around $50 million.

    The three paintings will be on view at Christie’s Rockefeller Center galleries on Monday and Tuesday, alongside selected works from the auction house’s February sales in London.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

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