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Thread: WTC Memorial - by Michael Arad (Architect) and Peter Walker (Landscape)

  1. #1636
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    Renovating a Sacred Place,
    Where the 9/11 Remains Wait


    Ruth Fremson/The New York Times
    The area, known as 'Memorial Park' since September 11, 2002, is where families of the victims
    have been gathering since the remains of their loved ones were brought there for identification.
    The area will remain open for the duration of the identification process.

    NY TIMES
    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    August 29, 2006

    In the most intimate and personal sense, in the sense of an ache that cannot be salved, ground zero is not really downtown.

    It is instead under a big white tent, stretching from East 29th Street to East 30th Street along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, in a temporary morgue that has become a permanent shrine of its own. Inside, 13,790 human remains from 9/11 are kept in three climate-controlled, walk-in containers, against the day when DNA-based identification techniques permit a final reckoning and the remains can be returned to families.

    Under the tent roof, but apart from the storage area, is a family room; a luminous, tranquil chapel where victims’ relatives can gather privately to mourn.

    “It was very meaningful to families who didn’t have anything to bury,” said Christine A. Ferer, one of whose roles is Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s liaison to the victims’ relatives. “We tried to give them an opportunity at least to pay their respects. This was tantamount to their mausoleum, their cemetery, their sacred space.”

    The space, almost four years old, was recently renovated. The altarlike fountain against the back wall, which had stopped working, was repaired. Legs were replaced on wooden benches that were warped by rainwater running down the sloping site. The gauzy theatrical scrim that forms the chapel ceiling was cleaned.

    Ordinarily closed on weekends, the chapel will be kept open on Sept. 9 and 10 for the large number of visitors expected before the fifth anniversary of the terrorist attack.

    “For families that may not have received any remains at all, this is where they can feel closer to their loved ones,” said Ellen Borakove, spokeswoman for the office of the chief medical examiner, which maintains the tent, formally known as Memorial Park.


    Patrick Andrade for The New York Times
    The medical examiner’s tent near the F.D.R. Drive, set up in December 2002 as a temporary morgue
    to store human remains.

    Many families qualify for that unwanted distinction. To date, the medical examiner has identified 1,598 victims, leaving 1,151 people — or 42 percent — yet to be accounted for. As many as 200 remains have been associated with an individual victim.

    And the unending currency of the task has been underscored by the discovery in the past year of 760 remains in the former Deutsche Bank building at 130 Liberty Street, opposite ground zero, which is being prepared for demolition.

    In 2001, as fall turned to winter, it became clear that a structure would be needed to shelter the 18 refrigerated trucks in which the remains were first stored. The tent was put up in a parking lot near the medical examiner’s office at 520 First Avenue.

    As winter turned to spring in 2002, it also became clear that family members needed more than an enclosed parking lot.

    Ms. Ferer, whose husband, Neil D. Levin, was killed in the attack, set out to build a chapel by Christmas.

    The $1 million project was financed in part by $300,000 from Newmark & Company (now Newmark Knight Frank), a real estate concern, which devoted a percentage of the commissions it received from relocating office tenants displaced by the attack. “We felt we had a moral obligation to share some of the benefits,” said Jeffrey R. Gural, Newmark’s chairman then and now.

    The firm 1100 Architect, which collaborated on the Irish Hunger Memorial in Battery Park City, designed the space.

    “I don’t know what limbo means,” said David Piscuskas, a founder of 1100, “but I know that family members didn’t have a conventional way of grieving.” He said the goal was a calm, neutral and nondenominational environment. The 57-by-30-foot area, on the north side of the tent, also had to be built so that it could quickly revert to use for refrigerated trucks, in case of another catastrophe. That dictated the bluestone paving.

    Bluestone was also chosen for the fountain slab, set in front of a wall of birch panels. The sound of falling water was meant to mask the noisy city outside the tent, Mr. Piscuskas said, and the constant hum of the refrigerating fans on the trailers within.

    The chapel’s side walls, mounted on rolling scaffolds, have arrays of fluorescent lamps behind a translucent membrane. The draped scrim rises to a peak 37 feet above the floor.

    Through the scrim, one can see the enormous American flag hanging over the storage area. The remains are no longer refrigerated, Ms. Borakove said, because they have been dehydrated to preserve them. They are kept in vacuum-sealed plastic pouches, with bar codes and identification numbers, on the shelves of insulated containers where temperature and humidity are kept constant.

    Eventually, they will be transferred to the ground zero memorial. Ms. Ferer is a director of the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, which is trying to raise $170 million. She said she did not want the world to forget that “the heart of the memorial is the human remains.”

    “In the minds of the 9/11 families,” Ms. Ferer added, “it’s not only sacred space, it’s going to be the final resting place of their loved ones.”

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  2. #1637
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Memorial Park

    New York, New York 2003

    1100 Architect.com



    1100's design of the Memorial Park at the office of the Chief Medical Examiner offers
    family members and relatives a private place to grieve and remember their loved ones.
    A pair of remembrance walls define and partially enclose the space.
    A textured and frosted glass canopy is supported above the walls and provides shelter
    from the elements, while creating an interior that is dignified, serene, and spiritual.






  3. #1638
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    I got a major solicitation mailing from the Memorial Foundation. Apparently, they're going to spent a good $50 million already raised on a slick fund-raising campaign. The new catch phrase? "Where were you when it happened?" Oh, but wait, they are only interested in where you were if you have $25 to $1000. Poor people need not tell their stories.

    A more appropriate ad is below...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Where was Bush.JPG 
Views:	229 
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ID:	2302  

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    Ah yes, remember the pet rock, proof that with slick marketing you can sell anything no matter how worthless.

  5. #1640
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider View Post
    they are only interested in where you were if you have $25 to $1000. Poor people need not tell their stories.
    You're completely right. Lets scrap the whole fund-raising campaign. People who can't afford $25 (probably about 0.1% of the population) might feel left out.

    In fact, why am I not being courted by the foundation to give a gift of at least million dollars? I want the attention dammit!


  6. #1641
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    Capturing Images of Progress and Hope


    Joel Meyerowitz / “Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive,” Phaidon Press;
    Joel / Librado Romero / The New York Times
    Weeks after 9/11, Joel Meyerowitz photographed messages from ground zero workers
    on Cedar Street. Almost five years later, right, he saw a clean tile wall.

    NY TIMES
    Blocks
    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    August 31, 2006

    JOEL MEYEROWITZ is a photographer. But what he heard yesterday was almost as important as what he saw: the sounds of children squealing with delight as they played on the cascading marble steps of the Winter Garden.

    He remembered five years ago when this vast public space in Battery Park City, opposite the World Trade Center, was so desolate, so silent, that he felt as if he ought to shout “Hello” to no one in particular (since no one else was there), simply out of the need to make and hear a human sound.

    It grows easier with every passing day to forget the extent of devastation downtown from the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001. So Mr. Meyerowitz’s photographs of the immediate aftermath — many of them being shown for the first time — carry almost more of a visceral impact today than they would have five years ago.

    They are also a barometer of progress and stagnation around ground zero.

    His book, “Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive,” is being published this month by Phaidon Press and introduced formally in a lecture and exhibition on Sept. 11 at the New York Public Library. Yesterday, Mr. Meyerowitz, 68, walked around the perimeter of the trade center site to discuss what had and hadn’t changed since the months in late 2001 and early 2002 when he had almost unimpeded access to the pile and the frozen zone around it.

    South of the site, the damaged and abandoned former Deutsche Bank building still stands at 130 Liberty Street. He photographed it on Sept. 26, 2001, with a four-story chunk of the trade center hanging from its facade. “This building seems to me a memorial to the incapacity to make decisions,” Mr. Meyerowitz said.

    It looms over Cedar Street, where he recorded a dusty tile wall filled with graffiti on Oct. 20: “Plumbers Local One N.Y.C.” “Chicago Police.” “Buffalo Fire.” “God Bless You.” “I Still Have Hope.” Though he peered closely yesterday, Mr. Meyerowitz could find no trace of this; not even scratches in the tiles.

    North of the site, the 52-story 7 World Trade Center stands where Mr. Meyerowitz recorded a patch of blue sky on May 24, 2002. But the shrouded and deserted Fiterman Hall of the Borough of Manhattan Community College, at 30 West Broadway, looks much the way it did four years ago.

    To the east, the 240-year-old St. Paul’s Chapel presented a scene yesterday that seemed unchanged by the centuries. On Jan. 26, 2002, however, Mr. Meyerowitz found the headstones outside the chapel covered in protective tents.

    “We were all told that the toxicity levels were workable,” he recalled, “but there they were, protecting these old stones from all the corrosives in the air.”

    Joel Meyerowitz/ “Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive,” Phaidon Press
    After the attacks, headstones were covered in St. Paul's Cemetery.


    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    Almost five years later, St. Paul's Cemetery has green grass
    where there was once debris and dust.

    Across Church Street, he glimpsed the Vesey Street staircase behind the steel fence around ground zero; its escalators long since gone and only the upper flight of steps intact. His photograph of Nov. 15, 2001, shows that the escalators — even their glass walls — were still there.

    So were the two flights of stairs that served as an important escape route on 9/11, earning them the name “survivors’ stairway.”

    Though it is now battered and stands in the way of the future Tower 2, survivors’ advocates and preservationists hope that the Vesey Street staircase will be saved, as the only aboveground remnant of the original World Trade Center.

    “Having something, a relic, tells a lot,” Mr. Meyerowitz said. “You understand steps. You can see yourself running down or up those steps. It’s a way of measuring.”

    Nothing is left of the pedestrian bridge that connected the trade center to the Winter Garden, which Mr. Meyerowitz enjoyed when he lived in the West Village. He said that he liked attending dance and music concerts or just sitting with a cup of tea under the barrel-vaulted skylight and towering palm trees.

    On Oct. 5, 2001, he returned.

    “To come in here through a gaping hole where the bridge used to stand, walk through hanging ceiling panels and see those trees blasted, the dust over everything, the emptiness — you could feel the tragedy, you could feel the desecration,” he said. “To suddenly find it abandoned, in ruins, is to shed light on our civilization.”

    REBUILT four years ago, with a sheer glass curtain wall in place of the elevated pedestrian bridge, the Winter Garden resounds again with noise.

    “It’s a play school,” Mr. Meyerowitz marveled yesterday.

    In the book, his photographic narrative ends in May 2002 with the removal from the site of the last column standing from the trade center. For a time, he imagined staying on the job.

    “When my momentum was strongest,” Mr. Meyerowitz recalled, “I felt it would be appropriate to chart the progress of rebuilding, thinking it would go forward without delay.

    “But I moved on.”

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  7. #1642

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    Quote Originally Posted by lbjefferies View Post
    You're completely right. Lets scrap the whole fund-raising campaign. People who can't afford $25 (probably about 0.1% of the population) might feel left out.

    In fact, why am I not being courted by the foundation to give a gift of at least million dollars? I want the attention dammit!

    It's not a question of how much money or who can afford it.

    The collection of stories and fund raising should be separate efforts. The Shoah Visual History Project has been recording video interviews with people affected by the Holocaust for years. They do not charge nor require any contributions from participants.

  8. #1643
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Tribute Center, an ‘Interim Destination’
    Sept. 11 Memorial, Is Readied for Opening


    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    Wendy Aibel-Weiss, program director and a co-curator of the Tribute Center,
    an interim museum of remembrance at the World Trade Center site,
    put finishing touches on a photo display of 9/11 victims yesterday.

    NY TIMES
    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    September 6, 2006

    Keys to the Jeep, a 20-trip PATH card and a bank deposit slip; perfectly ordinary things to carry on what began as a perfectly ordinary Tuesday. A firefighter’s sundered turnout coat. A daughter’s handmade fishing lure, never to be used again. A basketball jersey signed by the seventh and eighth graders who have lost their coach.

    A death certificate with this box checked on Line 8: Homicide.

    “How would you want your loved one to be remembered?” asked Lynn Tierney, the president of the Tribute Center, the first visitors’ center at ground zero, which will open today for private visits — victims’ relatives, survivors of the attack, neighbors, and rescue and recovery workers — then to the public on Sept. 18.

    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    A pair of pistols that melted in the intense heat at ground zero.

    Occupying a storefront at 120 Liberty Street, opposite the World Trade Center site, the Tribute Center has four ground-floor galleries taking a visitor from the construction of the twin towers through 9/11 and its aftermath to a room where the dead are commemorated in hundreds of photographs on a 10-by-30-foot wall, with personal mementos nearby.

    “While we build a grand memorial and memorial museum at the World Trade Center site,” Gov. George E. Pataki said yesterday, “the Tribute Center will be an interim destination for the millions of visitors who come here to learn and share experiences with the Sept. 11 community.”

    This will be a long interim. The memorial is not to open until 2009.

    Meanwhile, as many as 2,000 visitors are expected at the Tribute Center every day, said Jennifer Adams, the chief executive of the September 11th Families’ Association, which developed the center. BKSK Architects designed it. It cost about $3.4 million to build and was financed by the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

    When it opens to the public, visitors will be asked to make a $10 contribution, or $40 for a family, though they can walk in for free. The center will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and from noon to 6 p.m. on Sunday and Tuesday.

    Visitors will enter a gallery about the construction of the trade center and its vibrant everyday life, centered on an eight-foot-tall model.

    They will turn a corner into the second gallery to find what may be the most unnerving artifact: a mangled section of an airliner’s fuselage with one whole passenger window recognizably intact. This riveted, rounded portal almost invites a viewer to imagine what an awful panorama it must have framed for someone that morning.

    “We don’t want to know which plane this came from,” said Lee Ielpi, the vice president of the families’ association, explaining that in its anonymity, the wreckage stands for a more universal loss.

    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    A mangled section of an airliner’s fuselage with a passenger window frame intact.

    In the third gallery, within sight of a monumentally deformed steel beam, is one of Mr. Ielpi’s donations to the exhibition: the battered helmet and turnout coat, torn down the right side, that were worn by his son Jonathan. The helmet carries badge number 12642, which was Mr. Ielpi’s when he was a New York City firefighter and was passed on to Jonathan, who was killed on 9/11, then to Jonathan’s brother, Brendan, who is now a firefighter.

    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    Fireman Jonathan Ielpi's turnout coat and helmet were found two weeks after
    his body was recovered from ground zero.

    Responding to the center’s request for personal mementos, Evelyn Tepedino sent a pink and green fishing lure made by her daughter, Jody Nichilo, who worked in the north tower, and a note she wrote when she was about 10: “Dear Mom, Hi! How are you. I am fine. Well, I am writing this letter to tell you that I am going to wash the dishes tonight. O.K. Well, see you later. Love ya.”

    Ms. Tepedino, who lives in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, said it was difficult to choose a few remembrances. “There was so much to say,” she said. “How can I shorten it and make anyone aware of who she was?”

    Theresa Roberts sent a basketball jersey signed by the team at St. Catherine’s Church in Glen Rock, N.J., in memory of her husband and their coach, Timothy J. Finnerty. “I had pictures and other articles,” she said, “but more than anything else, that shirt was who Tim was.”

    “It means something that other people see in that shirt what I do,” she added. The jersey bears many signatures, including those of John Embry (“You pushed me to be a better player”), Daniel Kenny (“Your presence on the court made us all better players”) and Dane Osborn (“Your love for basketball inspired us all”).

    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    Lynn Tierney, the president of the Tribute Center,
    holds a basketball jersey signed by the team at
    St. Catherine’s Church in Glen Rock, N.J., in memory
    of their coach, Timothy J. Finnerty.

    In an even more intimate tribute, the family of Alfred J. Braca donated items that were recovered from his pockets, depicting someone who was simply on his way to work: Cantor Fitzgerald ID cards, $76 in cash, Jeep keys on a remote-lock fob with a panic button, a deposit slip still in its original triplicate form and several credit cards with 2002 expiration dates.

    Ann Johnson wanted to convey a more pointed message by sending a copy of the death certificate issued for her son Scott. Regarding that ornate document, she hopes visitors will focus on Line 8, as she did in October 2001.

    “I looked at it and saw the word ‘Homicide,’ and that broke my heart all over again,” Mrs. Johnson recalled. “We talk about those who were lost. We use all these euphemisms. But, in fact, it was murder.”

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  9. #1644

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    I'm looking forward to visiting that center. It's presence is needed while we wait for the memorial during the transition of ground zero. Keeps things in perspective.

  10. #1645

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    I visited the Tribute Center today. It is very well done. Simple, direct, effective. In fact, it does everything a visitors center should do. Funny thing, because it was developed as a place for visitors to go when visiting the site, sort of what a visitors center is meant to do. While the memorial and Memorial Museum have purposes going beyond the Tribute Center, the Tribute Center makes it obvious that no additional visitors' center is needed. The $80 Million proposed by Pataki should be spent on something meaningful, say, providing health care to workers at ground zero or helping the CIA hire a couple more analysts.

  11. #1646
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    10 PM Friday 9.08 ...

    The "LIGHTS" are on right now ... assuming it's a "test run" ...

    It looks like the location is closer to actual WTC site than before ... I know it's not at the GS HQ building site as in the first year.

    Any info on location this year?

  12. #1647

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    Battery Garage, I believe.

  13. #1648
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    PATAKI VETOES FEE-FREE SHRINE

    NY POST
    By KENNETH LOVETT
    Post Correspondent
    September 15, 2006

    ALBANY - Gov. Pataki yesterday vetoed legislation designed to keep entry to the World Trade Center memorial and museum free.

    The bill, which was vehemently opposed by Mayor Bloomberg, would have prohibited the expenditure of state funds for the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation unless its board of directors gave an "irrevocable pledge" not to charge admission.

    It would also have required the foundation to return all state money if admission is ever charged, regardless of how far into the future it is, and would give the Attorney General's Office the legal authority to go after the funds.

    In his veto message, Pataki said he understands the intent of the legislation, but noted that running "a world-class memorial comes at a significant expense, estimated at $50 million a year."

    He also said that requiring the memorial foundation to guarantee that no fee would ever be charged could actually hurt attempts to raise private dollars for construction by raising questions about the long-term ability to operate the site.

    "While the foundation is committed to exploring all revenue-generating options to defray these operating costs, it would be unwise to foreclose in perpetuity the option of charging an admission fee to defray a portion of these substantial costs," Pataki wrote.

    The governor added that "the vast majority" of the memorial will be open to the public free of charge and that family members of first responders and military veterans would not be charged a fee.

    The veto was one of 53 issued by the governor yesterday, 35 of which involved pension or other labor issues.

    Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

  14. #1649

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    Guys:

    Quick question.

    When the Memorial gets built, the two WTC footprint squares being the centerpiece, are there any plans to include permanent spotlights on the perimeter of the footprints (they can be normally hidden, perhaps in-ground), so that on 9/11 anniversaries they can be easily exposed and used for the "Tribute in Light"?

    Would this be even feasible, or are the lights simply too large?

    I personally find the tribute very moving and the actual footprints would be IMO the proper spot for the lights.

    Thx.

  15. #1650
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    That idea is not part of the Arad / Walker Memorial design.

    The actual lights used in the Towers of Light would be too large to incorporate into the existing design in the way you describe.

    But I like the idea ...

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