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Thread: New York gets no respect from midwesterners.

  1. #1

    Default New York gets no respect from midwesterners.

    http://www.iowa.rivals.com/showmsg.a...d=&style=2

    Read this thread carefully, it's quite entertaining. You'll know immediately when I enter the thread (I am 'the Howler'). I provide a very good case for NYC but they don't seem to listen. I want to hear your input.

  2. #2

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    That forum should be debating with Nebraska as to the tallness of cornfields.

    Soybean picked Paris. A nice city with one very iconic skyline feature, but...
    He should stay indoors on cropdusting days.

  3. #3

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    That forum should be debating with Nebraska as to the tallness of cornfields.

    Soybean picked Paris. A nice city with one very iconic skyline feature, but...
    He should stay indoors on cropdusting days.
    :lol:

  4. #4
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    Default

    The thread really descended into a pissing contest. In the Midwest, New York is either considered a mecca or a pariah—generally there's no middle ground. My dad was born in Cincinnati and raised in its suburbs, and moved to New York in 1975. His parents—my grandparents—fell in love with the City immediately and still enjoy coming here. My grandmother makes annual pilgrimages to Chinatown for knockoff watches and handbags—her friends give her money to buy them these things, as well. With the exception of the Dinkins administration neither my grandmother or grandfather felt unsafe in the City. However, some members of my extended family cultivate different impressions, though there are still more who love the City.

    As for the drug dealers in Washington Square, which seemed like the only negative connotation in the entire thread: I've had my run-ins with them as well, but they're generally low-key, keep to themselves unless approached, and don't push, not even at night when the park is generally vacant. You either consider the increased police presence in the park (there's a mobile command center on Washington Square South) or the fact that the community would not stand for violence in the park for very long, and those factors alone discourage more aggressive tactics. (Besides, from what I've heard their weed isn't that good.)

  5. #5
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    It's nice New York had someone to speak for it, though you're mostly wasting your time. Too many people in the rural states have such a negative impression of New York that their minds won't change no matter what evidence they're shown.

    It would be nice if you could credit my photos! NYatKNIGHT and a link to Wired New York would work fine.

  6. #6

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    Evidence? It's all relative, people are expressing their opinions on was it the best skyline? Whatever city people like the most, they've got their reasons, it's not a mathematical equation where certain facts add on to one othing, and other facts addup to another, if someone likes a city, they like it, if they don't they don't, liking NYC or not liking it isn't wrong or right, it's what you think. It really seemed like the problem only started when people were flaunting a bunch of New York is better than anything else in the universe quotes. I mean, how do you expect them to react, I remember how New Yorkers reacted about this time last year when I told a bunch of New Yorkers why Jersey City and New Jersey's better than New York, and they all flipped! Well how are these people supposed to react to "or city is better than anything you've ever seen or ever lived in". Becasue of farmer and crop comments like the ones mentioned here, that's why New York's so well-known for arrogance. There are other ways to appreciate something, than to put everything else down, that just makes you seem insecure, and turns off anyone else wjo might potentiallylike New York.

    Think about it

  7. #7

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    NYatKNIGHT -
    Sorry about not citing my sources, I have to remember that I'm taking other folks's possessions. HOWEVER, I have been advertising wirednewyork to several other websites I go to. I love this site and hope it's around for a very long time.

    I'm tryin' to spread the word.

  8. #8

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    remember how New Yorkers reacted about this time last year when I told a bunch of New Yorkers why Jersey City and New Jersey's better than New York, and they all flipped!
    What would you expect after making such a ridiculous statement?

  9. #9

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    Zippy,
    Why are New Yorkers always laughing at people from new Jersey? I don't know new jersey so i'm asking you this...All i know is that NJ is the place where the "Boss was born

  10. #10

    Default

    I don't. I mostly laugh at people from Boston, and it usually starts in about a month. :P

    I suppose it's the intertwined economies contrasting with the basic differences between the two areas. Actually, the border is relatively transparent.

  11. #11

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    Zippy.

    You can slam Michigan, I live there. But please don't diss Iowa. America needs places like Iowa...the absolute ruralness of Iowa countryside, the pureness of its small towns, the rolling hills, the agriculture etc... America needs to have some of these raw places.

    Michigan is an industrial, Conservative nightmare. IMO

  12. #12

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    It was just a joke. I would not have posted that on their forum. I actually like rural America - my uncle married a Pennsylvania farm girl, and I spent many boyhood summers down on the farm.

  13. #13

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    "I actually like rural America - my uncle married a Pennsylvania farm girl, and I spent many boyhood summers down on the farm."

    You know i! got this big book about the US nation and this is what i found out concerning agriculture :Agriculture in the United States has changed dramatically over the last 200 years. At the time of the American Revolution (1775-83), 95 percent of the population was engaged in farming. Today that figure is less than 2 percent. Although individuals or families own 85 percent of all farms in the United States, they own only 64 percent of the farmland. The remainder is owned by corporations, large and small, and farming and its related industries have become big business -- "agribusiness." Yet for all the changes, agriculture is a constant in American life, and the food produced is safe, abundant, and affordable.

  14. #14

    Default

    No, actually it's not a ridiculous statement, that's my opinion my belief, and I really don't care whether you agree or not, no matter how arrogant you can manage to be about it. You probably couldn't even reasonably back up your opinion about New Jersey. I mean, I don't know why you feel so threatened that you found it necessary to resppnd the way you did, but I guess only you know that. What is ridiculous is that you missed the whole point of my paragraph and did the thing New Yorkers are stereotypically known to do, not that they always do, but you're not doing much to change that perception.

  15. #15

    Default

    You probably couldn't even reasonably back up your opinion about New Jersey.
    I challenge you to find an unfair, negative statement I've made about New Jersey in this forum. It is you who assumed I was anti New Jersey because of my posts about the rural midwest, which I explained was just a joke. The fact that you responded in a thread about the midwest about a year-old topic indicates an obsession with your neighbor across the river.

    Your statement (made a year ago) is ridiculous, not because Jersey City is ridiculous, but the comparison with New York is apples and oranges. The
    mathematical equations you said don't exist in a comparison actually do exist. The city of Paris does not fit the equation of a best-skyline, just as there is no equation to fairly compare New York and Jersey City.

    Why is it that your "Jersey City is better than New York" is an opinion, but "New York is better than Jersey City" is arrogance?

    Finally, do you honestly think that this forum called Wired NEW YORK has an anti New Jersey bias?

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