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Thread: Battery Maritime Building - by Walker & Morris

  1. #16
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    This is a much bigger job than the job at the West Street portal, as the roadway leading down would need to be excavated at a point farther to the north of the Maritime Building

  2. #17
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A Stunning Makeover at the Battery




    By Etta Sanders
    Tribeca Trib
    April 4, 2006
    LINK

    It was once the Grand Central of ferry terminals. But for half a century after the ferries stopped running from the Battery Maritime Building, it has stood inconspicuously at the southern edge of Manhattan under coats of dull green paint.

    This month the city will complete a nearly $60 million exterior renovation of the Downtown landmark, restoring the turn-of-the-20th-century facade to its original decorative splendor.

    “It is as close to what it looked like in 1908 as is possible,” said Charles Silverman, vice president of Tishman Construction, the company that did the renovation.

    The city hopes to turn the four-story structure into a public food market, although the agency will also consider other public uses. Last month the city’s Economic Development Corporation (EDC), which oversaw the building’s restoration, gave the first tours of the interior to prospective developers. The EDC is accepting development proposals until May 10.

    The envisioned food market would be centered in the 10,000-square-foot, light-splashed great hall with its 30-foot ceiling topped by a peaked skylight running the length of the room. The stained glass panel that lays below the skylight may also be restored.

    The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park has expressed interest in converting the second and third floors, currently divided into small offices, into a food education facility, according to the EDC.

    The roof, with a panoramic view of New York Harbor that sweeps from the Williamsburg Bridge to Hoboken, could be a restaurant. It is now covered with gravel, barren except for a worn wooden picnic table.





    Two of the three ferry slips are currently used for ferries to Governors Island. The city is looking for a private ferry company to run ferries to Brooklyn.

    Designed by the architectural firm of Walker and Morris, the Battery Maritime Building was built in 1908 in the ornate industrial Beaux-Arts style. A twin terminal on the site where the new Staten Island Ferry terminal now stands was destroyed by fire.

    The street level of the Battery Maritime Building opened onto the three ferry slips where cars and horses were loaded. Passengers boarded the boats from the second floor. On the South Street side, a 256-foot, second-story outdoor veranda led directly to the platform of the elevated subway.

    But the building’s days as a bustling transit hub were relatively brief. By 1938, with the construction of bridges and tunnels, the ferries stopped running. The Department of Transportation took over the building for offices.

    A fourth floor was added in 1957. Little was done in the way of maintenance, and the exterior, including the windows, Silverman said, was covered in green paint.



    In 2001 a team of construction workers, architects and restorers began the renovation. They initially thought the building was constructed mostly of copper, mistaking the green paint for an aging patina. As they explored beneath the surface they discovered a cornucopia of materials—cast iron, steel, zinc, stucco and ceramic tile.

    Since only black and white photographs pre-dated the green paint, the restoration team also faced the challenge of determining the building’s original colors.

    Restorers took small chips from various parts of the building and, using microscopic analysis, discovered a rainbow beneath the green. The stucco walls are canary yellow and salmon pink. Wooden doorframes are bordered with ceramic tile in parrot green, cherry red and royal blue. The original corrugated glass panes of the windows are framed in dark ochre. The arched ceiling of the veranda is decorated in a herringbone pattern of tan Guastavino tile. Half a dozen six-foot-high, carved copper seals of the city of New York hang beside the ferry slips.



    The exterior steel and cast iron cladding was removed in more than 11,000 pieces and refurbished while the substructure was repaired. “It was like taking the skin off your body, repairing the bones, and putting the skin back on,” Silverman said.

    The structure beneath the once-colorful facade was so heavily decayed that had it been left alone for just five or 10 more years, the building would not have been salvageable, he said. “It would have been a major loss.”

    The renovation of the nearly century-old terminal, he said, “will make this building live another 75 to 100 years.”

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    This is a much bigger job than the job at the West Street portal, as the roadway leading down would need to be excavated at a point farther to the north of the Maritime Building
    The DOT could buy some space by getting rid of the turnabout lane at the end of the portal. It is really not necessary. I tis just luxury for the handful of drivers who use it every day, and can instead pick up the FDR northbound from the Brooklyn Bridge entrance.

  4. #19

    Default ferry service?

    Does anyone know why, the city is not considering restoring ferry service to the Maritime Building? Wouldn't that be the most obvious thing to do? A grand entrance to the city once again by boat (and very near subway entrances), instead of boring Pier 11. I mean, it's right next to the Staten Island Ferry terminal - what's the point of speading the boats all over Lower Manhattan?

  5. #20

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    The city needs a private developer to restore the interior. I'm sure they would lease it to a ferry operator, but from a passenger volume standpoint, Pier 11 is more attractive.

    The ferry slips will be used for access to Governors Island.

    it's right next to the Staten Island Ferry terminal - what's the point of speading the boats all over Lower Manhattan?
    Don't you think it's a good idea to diversify ferry terminal locations?

  6. #21

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    in general, yes, i do . . . but, there are a few (admittedly minor) disadvantages to having 3-4 around lower manhattan, as is presently the case.

    Firstly, if you don't take the ferry on a regular basis or if you need to make an out-of-the-ordinary trip, it makes predicting your departure point much less easy. NJ passengers on the Hudson crossings already complain that the ferries to/from the NJ landings are changing all the time, and during times of the day; leaving them bewildered about when they can travel to where. Tell me if I dont remember correctly, but the Maritime Building is better for intermodal connections? . . .

    Secondly, pier 11 is more of a walk (if I remember correctly) to the subways . . . whereas I seem to recall that a good number of subway lines have their last stop in Manhattan before Brooklyn quite near to South Ferry.

    And . . . I don't see any reason why we shouldn't provide modern ferry users the same sort of experience of glorious architecture at their point of arrival in Manhattan, that we used to have at the Maritime Building. It makes ferry travel more appealing for commuters and is a nice little tourist thing as well. We have Grand Central (and used to have Penn Station) for trains . . .

    Pity that it wouldn't handle the volume . . . and that they need a private developer . . .

  7. #22

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    I don't have present figures, but before 09/11, the 2nd busiest commuter ferry terminal (next to SI ferry) in America was the BPC terminal. It was not convenient to subways.

    For Manhattan destinations, intermodal connections are not as important as arriving close to your destination, because of the city's extensive subway system. Most people are not going to take a ferry from Brooklyn, and then take a subway. They'll take the subway from Brooklyn.

    The exception is the SI ferry for the obvious reason.

  8. #23
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    Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Long Island City, and Dumbo could all benefit from a ferry that utilizes metrocards. Ferries would be much more popular in NYC if they weren't so cost prohibitive in relation to subways.

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I took the water taxi today from 42nd down to WFC ... fantastic!

    And far better spending $10 zipping along the water under the blazing sun than sitting in traffic for twice as much.

  10. #25
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Dermot Co. to develop historic Battery building



    The Battery Maritime
    Building



    July 10, 2007

    The Economic Development Corporation selected the Dermot Company and restaurateurs the Poulakakos family to develop Lower Manhattan's historic Battery Maritime Building. The $110 million project will result in the creation of a food marketplace, boutique hotel and rooftop restaurant at the 1909-vintage Beaux-Arts building, which was a terminal for ferries traveling between Brooklyn and Manhattan in the first half of the 20th century. The EDC recently spearheaded a $60 million renovation of some of the building.


    Copyright 2003-2007 The Real Deal.

  11. #26

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    This is fantastic news. I hope it is not one of these false alarms, like every annoucement about Pier A over the past 30 years.

  12. #27
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Hmm... I dont think I am liking the look of this. Can they built something next to it, instead of on top of it, like that?


    Battery Maritime Building Renovation Revealed






    Monday, October 22, 2007, by Joey

    Ho. Ly. Crap. Behold, the Economic Development Corporation's vision for the $110 million makeover of the painstakingly restored Battery Maritime Building! While the details of the plan have not been a secret—gourmet food market, 135-room boutique hotel and a rooftop restaurant with a view to kill for—the future look of the landmark has been kept under wraps until now. A special Curbed tipster spotted this poster-size rendering at the Landmark Preservation Commission's public review, and she somehow managed to snap a shot of it before her brain exploded. She writes: "After all that great restoration work EDC is proposing a 'rooftop addition' to the Battery Maritime Building. It's about 5 stories (full-width) of glass for a hotel." As for if this extension will actually get built, that's up to the LPC to decide. The building is on the commission's docket for tomorrow morning's public hearing. Developing!


    http://curbed.com/archives/2007/10/2...n_revealed.php

  13. #28

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    OH NO!!!!
    Say it ain't soooooo

  14. #29

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