Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 137

Thread: Battery Maritime Building - by Walker & Morris

  1. #46
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    This might very well be one of those cases where the developer / architect has a second less-obtrusive design tucked away and which will be presented after folks scream and yell about this first clearly unacceptable design. The point being that they get the nay-sayers to say "The hotel plan is OK in theory, but can't you do a better job?" and -- voila! -- the new less overpowering design is presented and then folks say "Now that's more like it!" (when in fact if the 2nd proposal had been shown first most folks might have thought it, too, was too much to go on top of this one).

  2. #47

    Default

    I don't think it's impossible to do right by this building by adding height to its top; once again the hysterics of height get it wrong.

    Height would actually help block view of the monster behind:



    The problem is the addition's style, which is totally unsympathetic. Fuzzy rhetoric about past and present cannot save it:



    If you hired Quinlan Terry to do this job, it would turn out fine. Or Allan Greenberg.

    Rogers Marvel: wrong architects, wrong style.

    A better way to finish the top of a three-arched Beaux-Arts pile:


    Contemporaries --and potentially fraternal twins if done right?:

    .





    Btw, could this become the downtown Guggenheim ?

  3. #48
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    I hope not. Maybe they could build the Guggenheim in Brooklyn (with a sensible, attractive, non-Gehry design) and ferry Manhattanites over to it from the terminal.

  4. #49

    Default

    ^ Guggenheims don't deal in sensible. The one uptown isn't sensible either.

  5. #50

    Default

    ...the original 1906 Battery Maritime Building was originally crowned by a pergola. In the mid 1950's, a plain one story addition was built on it's roof"
    Can't they try to rebuild the pergola that was removed and, somehow encase that with glass?
    The currant proposal is Ghastly!

  6. #51

    Default

    November 25, 2007
    Dispatches



    Discontent on a Tip of the Island at the Center of the World

    By JAKE MOONEY

    ON a cold morning last week, bundled-up tourists strolled south along the East River from the South Street Seaport, past the pier where they could buy helicopter rides and the ornate Battery Maritime Building, where opaque green waves lapped against steel foundations.

    Some of the walkers approached the security guard who sits in a little blue booth nearby — the words “We were very tired, we were very merry” looming behind him on a mural inside the glass-walled Staten Island Ferry terminal — and asked for directions to the boat. He sent them around front to the terminal’s entrance, marked by a tall blue neon sign, then walked over to investigate a reporter who had been gazing up at the Maritime Building a bit too long.

    The building, a long-overlooked gem at the tip of Manhattan Island, opened in 1909 as the terminal for a ferry to Brooklyn. After that line shut down in the 1930s, the city used the building mainly for offices and storage. But it recently underwent a $60 million renovation sponsored by the city’s Economic Development Corporation, which is now overseeing a proposal by private developers to expand it with a hotel, restaurant and specialty food market. The guard said that when he had seen an artist’s rendering of a glass addition stacked onto its roof, he thought, “This is going to be some hotel.”

    That, for good and for ill, has been the reaction of many people upon viewing the eye-catching rendering, which was on display at a Landmarks Preservation Commission session on the building last month. The local chapter of the American Institute of Architects praised the addition, which in the rendering is luminous glass, stretching the full width of the existing Beaux-Arts building and roughly equal to it in height. But preservation groups were split, and the commission ultimately sent the design back to the developers for revisions.

    As for what an updated proposal might look like, the Dermot Company and the Poulakakos family, who are proposing $110 million worth of work, were being circumspect.

    “We are working hard to make design modifications consistent with the Landmarks Preservation Commission and public comments,” Stephen Benjamin, a Dermot principal, said last week in a statement, “and are hopeful that the design will be even more successful than our previous submission.”
    That submission’s relative success depends on who is judging. The Municipal Art Society, a preservation group that last spring presented an award to the architectural firm that restored the building’s exterior, said the proposed addition, by Rogers Marvel Architects, would bring new life to an underused building.

    But the group also asked for changes to reduce its visual impact. “One of New York’s iconic views is from the water looking at Manhattan’s skyline,” said Lisa Kersavage, a Municipal Art Society spokeswoman, “so this would be quite visible from that point.”

    Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, another preservation group, was harsher. “They did such a terrific job of restoring that building that to put this ridiculous glass addition on top of it just runs counter to all that they did,” he said. “It just strikes me as the height of foolishness.”

    Mr. Bankoff questioned the need for an addition at all, arguing that a hotel is an economically risky venture and suggesting that a restaurant, market or other retail establishment could fit inside the existing building.

    “If we start plunking glass on top of every flat-roofed building on the waterfront, it would look very bizarre,” he said. “Especially lit-up glass.”

    Fredric Bell, executive director of the New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects, said his group preferred not to focus on the details of the artist’s rendering or even the size of the rooftop expansion, since those can all change during the planning process. Rather, he argued that the project is commendable for what it represents: a gathering place on the waterfront that respects the old building but brings new uses.

    “Right now, that building has no reason to either welcome or stop people from going further,” Mr. Bell said. “People walk by it.”

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

  7. #52

    Default

    That submission’s relative success depends on who is judging. The Municipal Art Society, a preservation group that last spring presented an award to the architectural firm that restored the building’s exterior, said the proposed addition, by Rogers Marvel Architects, would bring new life to an underused building.
    Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, another preservation group, was harsher. “They did such a terrific job of restoring that building that to put this ridiculous glass addition on top of it just runs counter to all that they did,” he said. “It just strikes me as the height of foolishness.
    Ironic that the HDC was founded in 1971 as a branch of the MAS. It became independent in 1986.

    Like the LPC, MAS has become more of a tool of City Hall, while HDC may be the one truly independent advocacy group left in the city.

  8. #53

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ManhattanKnight View Post
    Fredric Bell, executive director of the New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects, said his group preferred not to focus on the details of the artist’s rendering or even the size of the rooftop expansion, since those can all change during the planning process. Rather, he argued that the project is commendable for what it represents: a gathering place on the waterfront that respects the old building but brings new uses.
    Typical architects' bullshit.

  9. #54

    Default

    We are working hard to make design modifications consistent with the Landmarks Preservation Commission and public comments,” Stephen Benjamin, a Dermot principal, said last week in a statement, “and are hopeful that the design will be even more successful than our previous submission.
    So they've been given the impression that the design just needs to be tweaked.

    Look for one floor to be lopped off, which misses the point, and declarations of success.

  10. #55
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Developers should be forced to read wirednewyork on a regular basis and then maybe they'll get a clue.

  11. #56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Developers should be forced to read wirednewyork on a regular basis and then maybe they'll get a clue.
    Edward? How about spamming the developers?

  12. #57
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ManhattanKnight View Post
    November 25, 2007
    Discontent on a Tip of the Island at the Center of the World

    The local chapter of the American Institute of Architects praised the addition, which in the rendering is luminous glass, stretching the full width of the existing Beaux-Arts building and roughly equal to it in height. Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
    This group has lost all credibility as far as I'm concerned.
    Blacklisted as of today.

  13. #58

    Default market

    I think it's the Alliance but don't forget the free loop buses that run around lower Manhattan and which stop across from the ferries. If the plaza was pretty and the water right there, the place would be an obvious destination. At least it is not as separated at the West Side. The market under the 59th Street Bridge does well. Does anyone know of any plans to open stores within the Brooklyn Bridge?

  14. #59
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    They Try a Different Top on Landmark

    Tribeca Trib
    By Nick Pinto
    January 1, 2008

    ..............
    ..............

    Developers proposing to top the landmark Battery Maritime Building, next to the Staten Island Ferry terminal, with a dramatic glass addition, returned to Community Board 1’s Landmarks Committee last month with a number of concessions in their design. But it wasn’t enough to please the committee, who declared the addition, a four-story glass-enclosed hotel atop the historic 1909 ferry terminal, still too big and obtrusive.

    The Economic Development Corporation, which owns and restored the building, gave the Dermot Company a 99-year lease in June. Dermot’s plans call for continuing ferry service to Governors Island from the building’s ground floor while turning the 9,000-square foot great hall on the second floor into a public space available for private events in the evening.

    The controversial element in Dermot’s plan, designed by Rogers Marvel Architects, is the construction of a 146-room hotel and rooftop restaurant, housed in a four-story glass cap on top of the existing building, nearly doubling the landmark’s height. Rooms are expected to cost up to $500 per night.

    It was Dermot’s second presentation to the committee, and board members found much improvement to the land side of the building: a more understated entrance; a window proposed for the building’s west side that is broken up into smaller, less jarring sections; a segmented southern façade (rather than the monolithic one first proposed) that reflects the architectural divisions of the original building.




    Dermot partner Steve Benjamin argued that the addition of a three-and-a-half foot railing between the original building and the addition extends the profile of the original building, further diminishing the visual impact of the addition.

    “There’s no question that this is a much better proposal,” said committee co-chair Bruce Ehrmann. “Many of the issues I had have been resolved. I just don’t understand why the addition is still so high.”

    Benjamin told the committee the addition, which was brought down three-and-a-half feet from the one first proposed, can’t be made much smaller.
    “We squeezed the penthouse as much as we could,” he said. “The hotel rooms are already smaller than standard. To make this project make financial sense, this is what we have to do.”

    However, Benjamin’s argument didn’t satisfy the committee.

    “If the developer is saying they need the addition to be so big to satisfy the financial side, that’s their problem,” said committee member Marc Ameruso. “Why should a historic landmark building have to suffer for a developer’s bottom line?”




    The committee asked Benjamin to consider their comments and return with further revisions before taking the proposal to the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    Benjamin agreed, but warned the committee that what they see now is very close to what they will get.

    We’ve tweaked this about as much as we think is possible,” Benjamin said. “We’re happy to come back and talk to you again, but it’s not going to look significantly different.”

    When Dermot first took its proposal to the Landmarks Preservation Commission in October, commissioners shared many of the Community Board’s concerns.

    The developer is expected to return to the commission in January, before the full Community Board makes its recommendation on the plan.

  15. #60
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    The latest version is definitely an improvement over the first one.

Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. WTC Memorial - by Michael Arad (Architect) and Peter Walker (Landscape)
    By Jasonik in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 5102
    Last Post: June 1st, 2017, 09:17 PM
  2. 30 Rockefeller Center - GE Building / former RCA Building - by Raymond Hood
    By ddny in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: July 23rd, 2015, 10:04 PM
  3. Herculean Effort to Restore Verizon Building - 140 West Street - by Ralph Walker
    By Fabb in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: April 28th, 2015, 02:25 PM
  4. The Fuller Building renovation - 42-story Art Deco trophy - by Walker & Gillette
    By Edward in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 25th, 2010, 10:37 PM
  5. Replies: 16
    Last Post: February 9th, 2008, 03:55 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software