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Thread: The Presidential Election

  1. #61

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    October 31, 2004

    OP-ED COLUMNIST

    Will Osama Help W.?

    By MAUREEN DOWD

    WASHINGTON — Some people thought the October surprise would be the president producing Osama.

    Instead, it was Osama producing yet another video taunting the president and lecturing America.

    After bin Laden's pre-election commentary from his anchor desk at a secure, undisclosed location, many TV chatterers and Republicans postulated that the evildoer's campaign intrusion would help the president.

    O.B.L., they said, might re-elect W.

    They follow the Bush strategists' reasoning that since President Bush rates higher than John Kerry on fighting terror, anytime Americans get rattled about Iraq and Al Qaeda, it's a plus for the president. And Republicans can keep claiming that Al Qaeda wants the "weak" Democrat elected, even as some intelligence experts suggest the terrorists prefer that the belligerent Mr. Bush stay in power because he has been a boon to jihadist recruiting, with his disastrous occupation of Iraq and his true believer, us-versus-them, my-Christian-God's-directing-my-foreign-policy vibe.

    The Bushies' campaign pitch follows their usual backward logic: Because we have failed to make you safe, you should re-elect us to make you safer. Because we haven't caught Osama in three years, you need us to catch Osama in the next four years. Because we didn't bother to secure explosives in Iraq, you can count on us to make sure those explosives aren't used against you.

    You'd think that seeing Osama looking fit as a fiddle and ready for hate would spark anger at the Bush administration's cynical diversion of the war on Al Qaeda to the war on Saddam. It's absurd that we're mired in Iraq - an invasion the demented vice president praised on Friday for its "brilliance" - while the 9/11 mastermind nonchalantly pops up anytime he wants. For some, it seemed cartoonish, with Osama as Road Runner beeping by Wile E. Bush as Dick Cheney and Rummy run the Acme/Halliburton explosives company - now under F.B.I. investigation for its no-bid contracts on anvils, axle grease (guaranteed slippery) and dehydrated boulders (just add water) .

    Osama slouched onto TV bragging about pulling off the 9/11 attacks just after the president strutted onto TV in New Hampshire with 9/11 families, bragging that Al Qaeda leaders know "we are on their trail."

    Maybe bin Laden hasn't gotten the word. Maybe W. should get off the trail and get on Osama's tail.

    W. was clinging to his inane mantra that if we fight the terrorists over there, we don't have to fight them here, even as bin Laden was back on TV threatening to come here. The president still avoided using Osama's name on Friday, part of the concerted effort to downgrade him and merge him with Iraqi insurgents.

    The White House reaction to the disclosures about the vanished explosives in Iraq was typical. Though it's clear the treasures and terrors of Iraq - from viruses to ammunition to artifacts - were being looted and loaded into donkey carts and pickups because we had insufficient troops to secure the country, Bush officials devoted the vast resources of the government to trying to undermine the facts to protect the president.

    The Pentagon mobilized to debunk the bunker story with a tortured press conference and a satellite photo of trucks that proved about as much as Colin Powell's prewar drawings of two trailers that were supposed to be mobile biological weapons labs.

    Republicans insinuated that it was a plot by foreign internationalists to help the foreigner-loving, internationalist Kerry, a U.N. leak from the camp of Mohamed ElBaradei to hurt the administration that had scorned the U.N. as a weak sister.

    In their ruthless determination to put Mr. Bush's political future ahead of our future safety, the White House and House Republicans last week thwarted the enactment of recommendations of the 9/11 commission they never wanted in the first place.

    While pretending to be serious about getting a bill on reorganizing intelligence agencies before the election, the White House never forced Congressional Republicans to come to an agreement. So the advice from the panel that spent 19 months studying how the government could shore up intelligence so there wouldn't be another 9/11 may be squandered, even though Dick Cheney's favorite warning to scare voters away from Mr. Kerry is that we might someday face terrorists "in the middle of one of our cities with deadlier weapons than have ever before been used against us," including a nuclear bomb.

    Wow. I feel safer. Don't you?

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  2. #62

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    Is that a critique or a colonic?

    p.s. hard to tell the difference between Matthew and Maureen.

  3. #63

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    I hope this holds up.


    From Reuters:

    In every presidential election since 1936, the Redskins' last home game has accurately predicted the winner. If they win, the incumbent president's party wins. If they lose, the challenger wins.


    The Redskins lost to Green Bay 28-14 and Kerry quickly celebrated.

  4. #64

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    Weekly Reader kids select Bush in Presidential Poll

    The students who read Weekly Reader’s magazines have made their preference for President known: they want to send President Bush back to the White House.
    The results of this year’s Weekly Reader poll have just been announced, and the winner is President Bush. Hundreds of thousands of students participated, giving the Republican President more than 60% of the votes cast and making him a decisive choice over Democratic Senator John Kerry.
    Since 1956, Weekly Reader students have correctly picked the president 11 out of 12 times, making the Weekly Reader poll one of the most accurate predictors of presidential outcomes in history.
    President Bush was a strong winner in the student poll; the only state Senator Kerry won was Maryland. Senator Kerry was also in a statistical dead heat with President Bush in New York, Massachusetts, Washington, D.C. and Vermont. President Bush won most grades, although Senator Kerry did win among tenth-graders.
    This year students caught election fever, with an increase of more than 20% in the number of students participating in the Weekly Reader poll than in any prior year. While there were participants from grades K through 12, third- and fourth-graders were the most enthusiastic voters. More than 57,000 students from each of those two grades voted.
    The presidential poll, in which teachers collected their students’ votes and forwarded them to an independent polling company to be tabulated, is part of Weekly Reader’s “Promote the Vote” program, created to teach students about the election process, the issues, the candidates, and how democracy works.
    “This program teaches students that voting is a privilege and a responsibility,” said Emily Swenson, President of Weekly Reader. “Through this authentic experience, we are hoping students will become advocates and lifelong voters. And even though the election may be over in eight days, the learning will continue.”
    As part of the Promote the Vote Program, Weekly Reader will also conduct an essay contest called Write Your Own Acceptance Speech. In this contest, students from grades three through 12 will be asked to write the speech they would give if they were going to be inaugurated as President in January. Contest rules will be posted at the Weekly Reader Website (www.weeklyreader.com) beginning November 8.
    To select this year’s presidential poll winner, classrooms across the country submitted ballots, called in results via a toll-free number, or voted online. The results were tabulated by Zogby International, which has been conducting public opinion polls since 1984.
    For results by grade click here.

  5. #65

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    Football is an exacting science.

    School kids smoke pot.

    Come to think of it, so do football players.

    Nevermind.

  6. #66

    Default COOKIE-GATE..... tsk tsk Theresa...

    Family Circle’s Cookie Cook-Off has actually predicted the past three Presidents -- In 1992, Clinton’s oatmeal-chocolate chip cookies beat Barbara Bush’s chips, The First Lady Clinton’s chips repeated victory against Elizabeth Dole’s pecan roll cookies in 1996, and Laura Bush’s Texas Governor’s Mansion Chocolate Cowboy Cookies won over Tipper Gore’s Ginger Snaps in 2000.

    Results
    :P

  7. #67

    Default Fighting That Feeling of Irrelevance

    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/02/nyregion/02nyc.html
    November 2, 2004
    NYC
    Fighting That Feeling of Irrelevance
    By CLYDE HABERMAN

    THE esteemed political theorist Edward Kennedy Ellington saw this presidential election coming. Decades ago, he understood instinctively what voting would be like in 2004 for New Yorkers and everyone else living in states not consecrated with an adjective like "battleground."

    He anticipated the feeling of irrelevance that would overcome those people as they prepared to cast their ballots. Mr. Ellington, possibly better known to you as Duke, did his best to capture that mood as crisply as he could. In collaboration with Irving Mills, he succeeded admirably:

    "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)."

    No, it don't.

    Oh, sure, it's important to vote today. But let's not kid ourselves, fellow New Yorkers. In the Electoral College, where the real game is played, a vote cast in our sapphire-blue state hardly counts as much as one in wobbly Ohio or Pennsylvania or Florida. Perhaps it goes too far to say that it don't mean a thing. But without that swing, it certainly don't mean as much.

    What's a nonswinging New Yorker to do except that which we in this navel-gazing, celebrity-conscious town do best? Why not see what some of our most famous politicians are up to?

    There is Senator Charles E. Schumer, a Democrat running for re-election with even less serious opposition than President Hamid Karzai recently faced in Afghanistan. Although a shoo-in, Mr. Schumer has stockpiled enough cash to buy a small country. He wants everyone to believe he has no plans to use it for, oh, a governor's race in two years. He has no higher ambition, he says - before adding, "at this point." You decide.

    New York's other Democratic senator, Hillary Rodham Clinton, has been out campaigning for Senator John Kerry. If he loses, the Democrats will face a vacuum for the 2008 presidential nomination. That would leave Mrs. Clinton heartbroken. Or not. You may decide this one, too.

    Then there is Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, an example of the possible complications of undergoing Rino-plasty. That is a special kind of plastic surgery. It turned Mr. Bloomberg, a lifelong Democrat, into a Republican of convenience, or as some prefer, a Rino: Republican in name only.

    This Rino endorses Mr. Schumer and not his party's candidate, Howard Mills. And while he says he supports George W. Bush, Mr. Bloomberg went out of his way during the Republican National Convention to be nowhere near the president when a camera was around. Who needs inconvenient pictures when you run for re-election in a Democratic city? A Bush-Bloomberg hug? You stand a better chance of finding J. D. Salinger on the Leno show.

    New York is not just Rino territory. It also has Dinos. One Dino-in-training is former Mayor Edward I. Koch.

    He calls himself "a lifelong Democrat." But he is campaigning vigorously for Mr. Bush. Over the last dozen years, Mr. Koch has endorsed or said he would vote for Republican candidates for governor, senator and mayor. Imagine what he might have done as a lifelong Republican.

    One real Republican is Gov. George E. Pataki, who has a knack for making himself scarce when bad news is afoot. Mr. Pataki did just that last week when the New York subway celebrated its 100th anniversary. The governor was supposed to show up for the ceremonies. Instead, he sent his lieutenant governor.

    HAVING trouble conjuring the name? That's what we thought. It's Mary O. Donohue. While she filled in, Mr. Pataki roamed out of state, campaigning for the president. Thus he managed both to show party loyalty and to spare himself troublesome questions about those looming subway fare increases.

    Messy questions have surely dogged former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani now that he has made himself a dutiful spinmeister for Mr. Bush. On the "Today" show the other morning, Mr. Giuliani said that American soldiers, not the president, bore "the actual responsibility" for those missing explosives in Iraq. The buck, apparently, stops not here but way out there.

    It was an atypical stumble for the former mayor, basking in secular canonization since Sept. 11 (and forever reminding audiences where he was when the towers burned). No doubt, though, he has plenty of time to regain his footing.

    Which may be more than can be said for the rest of us in New York, where only two things seem certain: We ain't got no swing, and a guy who went to Yale will emerge today as the winner.

    On second thought, drop that "today." It might be going too far out on a limb.

  8. #68

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    The one good thing to have already come out of this election is increased voter interest and, hopefully, turnout. The steady erosion of citizen participation has been the most serious threat to the political process, since it allows campaign organizations to more easily focus in on target groups.

    This renewed interest could be dampened by the relentless specter of battleground states. Voters in Illinois and Georgia have to believe that their efforts count for something, other than bragging rights to a meaningless popular vote count. More sophisticated polling and the availability of data make "battleground states" more easily identified. As a result, the majority of the electorate become bystanders months before election date. I know many people from Ny that traveled to Pennsylvania to volunteer as campaign workers, just for the feeling of involvement.

    It is time to abolish the Electoral College.

    Messy questions have surely dogged former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani now that he has made himself a dutiful spinmeister for Mr. Bush. On the "Today" show the other morning, Mr. Giuliani said that American soldiers, not the president, bore "the actual responsibility" for those missing explosives in Iraq. The buck, apparently, stops not here but way out there.
    I guess Giuliani is going out of his way to top the "Thank God George W Bush is president" remark he had the presence of mind to make while buildings were falling around him. I vaguely remember my words, standing on Liberty and South End Ave as the south tower began to collapse, were "Oh shit!"

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    The one good thing to have already come out of this election is increased voter interest and, hopefully, turnout. The steady erosion of citizen participation has been the most serious threat to the political process, since it allows campaign organizations to more easily focus in on target groups.

    This renewed interest could be dampened by the relentless specter of battleground states. Voters in Illinois and Georgia have to believe that their efforts count for something, other than bragging rights to a meaningless popular vote count. More sophisticated polling and the availability of data make "battleground states" more easily identified. As a result, the majority of the electorate become bystanders months before election date. I know many people from Ny that traveled to Pennsylvania to volunteer as campaign workers, just for the feeling of involvement.

    It is time to abolish the Electoral College.
    Rather than abolishing the Electoral College, which would need a Constitutional Ammendment quorum of 3/4th of the States (small States would never ratify it), proportional assignment of electors is within the purview of individual States. For an example of this check out what Colorado is trying to do during this election.

    Of course this could lead to this situation more often, (especialy with third or fourth party canditates):
    f no candidate receives an absolute electoral majority for President, then the House of Representatives is required to go into session immediately to vote for President. In this case, the top three electoral vote getters for President are the candidates for the House of Representatives to select from, and the House votes en-bloc by state for this purpose (that is, one vote per state). If no candidate receives an absolute majority of electoral votes for President, then the Senate must do the same, with the top two vote getters for that office as candidates. If the House of Representatives has not chosen a winner in time for the inauguration (noon on January 20), then the Consitution specifies that the new Vice President becomes Acting President until the House selects a President. (If the winner of the Vice Presidental election is not known by then, then under the Presidential Succession Act of 1947, the Speaker of the House would become Acting President until the House selects a President.)
    http://www.wordiq.com/definition/U.S._Electoral_College

  10. #70

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    LOOKS LIKE BUSH IS GONNA WIN. HES ONE ELECTORAL VOTE AWAY :lol: :P

  11. #71

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    This is very interesting... foxnews.com is reporting bush with 269 electoral votes and kerry with 242. at the same time cnn.com is reporting bush with 254 and kerry with 252. recount???? :roll:

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Freedom Tower
    LOOKS LIKE BUSH IS GONNA WIN. HES ONE ELECTORAL VOTE AWAY :lol: :P
    There were also cheers when the Germans rolled into Paris.

  13. #73

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    You two appear to be on the same plane.

  14. #74
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    Ohio is being contested. It's going to be Florida all over again.

  15. #75

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    No, the number of provisional ballots are not there for Kerry. Even if 100% of them are validated and not thrown out, nearly ALL would need to be for Kerry.
    Extremely doubtful.

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