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Thread: New York City's Population Growth

  1. #151
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    Crain's

    Mayor sets goals for growing City

    By: Catherine Tymkiw
    Published: December 12, 2006 - 12:29 pm

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg outlined an ambitious plan to meet the city’s future housing and infrastructure needs as the population is expected to reach nine million by 2030.

    The mayor, speaking at an event hosted by the League of Conservative Voters, said the city will add an estimated 200,000 people by 2010 and its size could reach the equivalent of adding the population of Boston and Miami to the five boroughs by 2030.

    That growth, coupled with an aging infrastructure, will take its toll on the city's environment and require some sweeping changes. "Growth is a challenge that can produce great benefits, but only if we prepare for it and guide it," said Mr. Bloomberg.

    His top three goals are to create enough housing for the expected surge in population, to ensure there are enough parks and green space, and to add capacity to the regional mass transit system.

    "Our subway system and highway networks are extensive, and heavily-used, yet nearly 3,000 miles of our roads, bridges and tunnels, and the majority of our subway stations are in need of repair," said the mayor. "By 2030, virtually every major infrastructure system in our city will be more than a century old and pushed to its limits."

    Mr. Bloomberg's plan calls for developing back-up systems for the city's water network, ensuring all of the city's roads, subways and rails are fully repaired, and upgrading the city's energy infrastructure. He also wants to cut the city's global warming emissions by more than 30% by 2030 among other environmental changes.

    "To address the challenges before us, we'll seek the cooperation of policymakers at every level of government," said the mayor.

  2. #152
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    information on the mayors plan, etc, etc, can be found here

    http://www.nyc.gov/html/planyc/html/home/home.shtml


    not a lot stuff at the moment - but some interesting maps

  3. #153

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    STATEN GROWS ON US

    By LEONARD GREENE

    March 22, 2007 -- The Big Apple didn't get much bigger since the last official census - but Staten Island is beginning to burst at the seams.

    According to new population estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau, Staten Island posted the second-largest growth among counties in New York state, with 7.6 percent more residents than it had six years ago.

    About 444,000 people lived in Richmond County in 2000, the last time an official government head count was conducted - and researchers estimate the borough has since grown by nearly 34,000 people.

    In New York state, Only Orange County outpaced Staten Island over the six years between 2000 and 2006 - posting a 10.3 percent growth.

    The increase in Orange County was part of an overall Hudson Valley surge fueled by an influx of New York City residents after 9/11. Nearby Dutchess and Putnam counties each grew by about 5 percent over the same period, according to the estimates.

    The city did grow in the past half-decade, but by a mere 200,000 people. Brooklyn added 43,295 residents to reach 2,508,820, for growth of 1.8 percent.

    Manhattan grew by 4.8 percent, adding 74,209 people to reach 1,611,581 residents. Queens, the biggest borough by area, gained 1.2 percent, reaching 2,255,175 people.

    The city's population growth outpaced the rest of the state, where 46 of New York's 62 counties saw more people move out in 2005 than move in.

    "New Yorkers continue to vote with their feet, looking for opportunity elsewhere," said Bob Ward of the Business Council of New York State.

    Population losses in upstate pockets - some due to students moving away following college - have prompted Gov. Spitzer to appoint a czar of upstate economic development.

    Statewide estimates released in December showed New York was one of only four states that have failed to grow since 2005.

    Jefferson County, home to Fort Drum, was hardest hit, losing an estimated 1.1 percent of its residents, many as deployed soldiers.

    Overall, the Empire State's population has stayed flat at about 19.3 million over the past year. In that time, Nassau County lost 5,958 people and The Bronx lost 3,093.

    Meanwhile, Erie County, which includes Buffalo, has lost 28,875 people since 2000 - which accounts for 3 percent of its total.

    As many Americans seem to be sick of snowy upstate New York, Arizona's Maricopa County, home to Phoenix, gained 696,000 residents in the six years, the biggest gain among the nation's 3,141 counties. With Post Wire Services

    leonard.greene@nypost.com

  5. #155
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    Default New York keeps growing

    According to the latest estimates, New York is past 8.2 million people.

    NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- What's the fastest-growing American city with more than half a million people?
    If you guessed Ft. Worth, you are correct. Dallas' next-door neighbor added more than 20 percent to its population from July 2000 through July 2006, according to the latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.
    But if you answered New York, you were also correct. With 205,750 new citizens, Gotham added more residents than any city in the United States since 2000. That's enough new New Yorkers to fill a city the size of Boise, Idaho, bringing its total number to 8,214,826 - an all-time high.
    New York is one of the few major old industrial towns that have not experienced a substantial shrinking in the number of its core residents. The top 10 cities of a hundred years ago would have included places like Baltimore (now at 631,366, the 19th largest), Boston ( 590,763, 22nd), Cleveland (444,313, 40th) and St Louis (347,181, 52nd).
    Many of the older cities are only losing population from their core areas while the suburbs around them are still growing. But even taking into account total metro-area growth, the newer sunbelt cities are growing at a faster rate than older, industrial towns.
    Each of the 10 biggest cities once lay within 500 miles of the Canadian border. Now, seven of the top 10 are sun-belt cities, closer to Chihuahua than Toronto.
    Some of the nation's biggest cities today were mere blips on the radar at the turn of 20th-century America. Los Angeles, the nation's second largest city with 3,849,378 people, had a population of just over 100,000 in 1900.
    Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, San Diego and San Jose, Calif. all had fewer than 100,000.
    Phoenix, which 100 years ago was not even among the 100 most populous cities, grew by more than 40,000 residents during the 12 months ended July 1, 2006. Phoenix passed Philadelphia, which has lost about 70,000 residents during the 2000s, to become the fifth biggest American city.
    The biggest loser of the 2000s, outside of New Orleans, where hurricane-related losses drove more than half the city's residents away, has been Detroit. Motown endured a net loss of 80,000 people during the 2000s, leaving the population at less than half of its 1950s heyday.
    Cleveland (- 6.9 percent), Pittsburgh (-6.5 percent) and Buffalo (-5.7 percent) also continued to show big losses since 2000.
    Americans still love to drive to work
    The fastest growing of any of the cities of more than 50,000 population was McKinney, Texas, which lies in the path of the outward expansion of Dallas. It has nearly doubled in size since 2000 to 107,530.
    Other growth spurts occurred in Gilbert, Arizona (73.9 percent to 191,517), North Las Vegas (71.1 percent to 197,567) and Port St Lucie, Florida (61.9 percent to 143,868).
    North Las Vegas led the nation in growth rate for the 12 months ended July 1, 2006. Its population increased 11.9 percent. Second was McKinney at 11.1 percent and Port St. Lucie was third at 9.9 percent.
    Twelve-month numerical leaders included Phoenix (43,192), San Antonio (33,084) and Ft. Worth (30,202).

  6. #156
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    Nice to see we are still growing, we are the only major Northeastern or Midwestern City that saw a increase in population

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    Now if only our "local" paper the Wall St Journal would stop printing editorials by Joel Kotkin who claims NY is losing people. He has some anti-city rant every 6 months or so and the Journal gives him a soapbox.

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    Not only that, but the city estimate is a big undercount. The Department of City Planning successfully challenges the estimate every year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyO View Post
    Now if only our "local" paper the Wall St Journal would stop printing editorials by Joel Kotkin who claims NY is losing people. He has some anti-city rant every 6 months or so and the Journal gives him a soapbox.
    The State of NY has lost many people as many areas and cities are emptying out.

    The city gains population overall mainly from immigration.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6 View Post
    The State of NY has lost many people as many areas and cities are emptying out.

    The city gains population overall mainly from immigration.
    Right. But the editorialist I am talking about specifically talks about New York City, which is clearly gaining people.

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    ^ I wouldn't entirely dismiss his theory given the fact that the city has gotten prohibitively expensive for many immigrants and many are now opting for the 'burbs as well as other cities across the country.

    That, plus living spaces are now larger and occupied by yuppies. In the past that same amount of space one yuppie occupied would probably have a whole family living in it.

    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6 View Post
    The city gains population overall mainly from immigration.
    Obviously. Manhattan yuppies are more likely to raise cats and/or dogs than children. You won't get much of a population increase relying on this group.

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    ^ I wouldn't entirely dismiss his theory given the fact that the city has gotten prohibitively expensive for many immigrants and many are now opting for the 'burbs as well as other cities across the country.
    Perception of the value of living here or not has nothing to do with the reality of statistics. All estimates say NY is gaining population.

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    That, plus living spaces are now larger and occupied by yuppies. In the past that same amount of space one yuppie occupied would probably have a whole family living in it.
    Living spaces now are larger and that is for most New Yorkers. But we are talking a night and day difference between 19th/20th century living conditions and now. There is just more space dedicated to housing here now. This comes from infill of lots, vertical development as well as change of use to residential.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TonyO View Post
    Perception of the value of living here or not has nothing to do with the reality of statistics. All estimates say NY is gaining population.
    I'm not saying the estimates are wrong. I KNOW we are growing. I just think that the growth will be relatively brief and modest (perhaps into the next decade) and from then on, it'll either be flat or even dip slightly. That's all.

    Living spaces now are larger and that is for most New Yorkers. But we are talking a night and day difference between 19th/20th century living conditions and now. There is just more space dedicated to housing here now. This comes from infill of lots, vertical development as well as change of use to residential.
    But eventually all of that will be filled up. With all the downzonings across the city, both having occurred and a few on the way, the ability to support a tremendous growth spurt is just not there.

  14. #164

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    Living spaces now are larger and that is for most New Yorkers. But we are talking a night and day difference between 19th/20th century living conditions and now. There is just more space dedicated to housing here now. This comes from infill of lots, vertical development as well as change of use to residential.
    Statistics bear this out. Manhattan's peak Census-year population was 2.76 million in 1910, while the current estimate is only 1.6 million. I don't know the numbers on historical housing stocks, but there's certainly many more square feet of residential space today than 100 years ago. Even with all the ongoing housing developments Manhattan's population isn't likely to reach a new high in my lifetime. People are just so much wealthier now that they demand a lot more space.

  15. #165

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    It's my own personal opinion, but I don't think it's so much due to wealth as a sense of entitlement that's the reason people are demanding so much personal space. When I moved to the area in 1994, pretty much everyone expected to live with roommates. Today, people seem to demand their own apartment upon setting foot in the city, and I don't think it's healthy.

    It's almost as if people believe the city should conform itself to their needs, and a few years later, when they find out that it won't, they give up and move. Thus, the tremendous influx of people looking for luxury "condos" as opposed to apartments (and we're talking about all rental units here), and people claiming that they're "young, white, single" folk seeking a supposedly safe place to live. Certainly not in all cases, but in many, these people are looking to surround themselves with people who are mirror images of themselves. The majority of this city is not white, and newcomers need to suck it up instead of isolating/insulating themselves.

    Frankly, I think the Sex And The City BS has gone on for so long that it's damaging the city itself. New York needs people who are willing to throw it in for the long haul, not more flights of fancy upon the part of people who watch syndicated TV. Long-term residents equal growth and progress; people looking to fulfill some unachievable fantasy equal ridonkulous rental prices and more crappy bars serving over-priced drinks. Or maybe more importantly, people who are too lazy to walk an extra two blocks to the nearest drugstore or bank.

    And no, it's not wealth that's bringing these people to New York City: it's parents who are willing to put up with this nonsense for a year or two, then pull the plug when they find out their children aren't as capable as they thought they were. Sorry, but until that parental cash cow dies, it's not considered wealth- it's charity.

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