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Thread: Black People Not Welcome at Eden Bar & Restaurant

  1. #1

    Default Black People Not Welcome at Eden Bar & Restaurant

    The Eden bar & restaurant (at 105th St & Broadway in Manhattan) exhibits blatant racism. Check out the CBS video (from their "Shame On You" program).

    Embedded Video:
    http://wcbs.dayport.com/viewer/viewe...Category_ID=48

    Direct Video:
    http://wcbs.dayport.com/viewer/conte...31&Obj_ID=

    The text of the story:
    http://cbsnewyork.com/shamestories/l...063204624.html

  2. #2
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    That's totally unreal and unacceptable. I can't believe that such blatant discrimination is still alive and well.

  3. #3

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    How bad is the racism in New York, exactly? I've heard various people say how rampant it is, and i've even seen a few recent articles along the same vein (one about South Staten Island in particular). I'm concerned about this, because as an African-American looking to move to NYC, I don't want to end up in a situation similar to when i spent my teenage years in Boston, where you couldn't go to certain neighborhoods. I understand that racism is everywhere, and hopefully I'm just being naive, but if anyone has something to say on the matter please, by all means, feel free to inform.

  4. #4
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    I've barely ever seen any public examples of racism. As far as I know it's looked down upon in every place in the city. The biggest threats of racism are probably in areas experiencing a significant ethnic transition.

    Of course you always have the supermorons, but there are some of them in every city and town in the country.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcn8tv
    I'm concerned about this, because as an African-American looking to move to NYC, I don't want to end up in a situation similar to when i spent my teenage years in Boston, where you couldn't go to certain neighborhoods.
    My impression is that racism is pretty much hidden now. It exists (like in the above story about Eden), but it probably won't stop you from going to any neighborhood.

    On the other hand, there are some blatant cases of discrimination. Like how some Hasidic Jews want to keep Williamsburg, Brooklyn to themselves.
    http://www.nymetro.com/nymetro/news/...gencer/n_9756/
    http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=2472

    Or some thugs painting swastikas on synagogues and Jewish community centers.
    http://1010wins.com/topstories/winst...084140653.html

    And it is often reported in the media how black people will have more difficulty getting picked up by taxi cabs.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/1999/...ain69022.shtml

    Racism & discrimination certainly exists. But it won't stop you from going into any NYC neighborhood. And you won't have trouble with most NYC establishments. But since NYC is such a diverse city with so many races/ethnicities living together, there will be cases of racial tension.

    For the most part, I don't think NYC has a particularly high level of racism, and I don't think you should be discouraged from coming to NYC because of it.

  6. #6
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    New York is by no means Detroit, Chicago or Boston. Many old racial housing patterns, unfortunately, still exist (the stark divide along 96th Street between Yorkville and Spanish Harlem is still there: luxury apartments on the south side, housing projects on the north), but de facto segregation is much less frequent now than in more recent years and race relations haven't been better in recent history.

  7. #7

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    Thanks so much for the info!!! I've been coming to New York for years, as far as visiting, but as we all well know, living somewhere can be a entirely different thing. I didn't want to move up there, and get suprised by some ugly situation.

  8. #8
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    That is so bad.

    Racisim does exist, and you see it pop up, but NY is one of the most tolerant cities in the world. It sort of has to be.

    But as tolerant as it is, it is VERY segregated. Within 3 blocks you go from one neighborhood to the next. The easiest example is Little Italy to Chinatown.

    I guess it is just humans natural pack instinct and visual fixation that is the most to blame for segregation. We feel more comfortable with people that are the closest to us in culture, opinion and other facets, and we associate a persons looks, from what they wear, to WHO they are, as judgement of this.

    If we were all the same race (as was seen in my Yuppie HS) people will find SOMETHING about you that is different in order to seperate you from the others. (You are wearing THAT??!?).

    So whatever.

    I think this manager should be fired and the owner should be a LOT more careful about this.

  9. #9
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Loaded question though. Do you think they had a group of minorities in there for a party before and had a bad experience with them?

    Do you think something like that would enforce their stereotypes?

    Do you think a guy in workboots and a flannel with a nice big hat and belt buckle would stand a better chance of getting the room?

    I know the comparisons and examples are not fair excuses, but I think it might bring up some interesting points/observations from the people here.

    What do you think?

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    Dear dcn8tv: During your visits to NYC, have you been in neighborhoods where you would consider living? Visit a prospective neighbourhood, shop in the bodegas and stores, eat in the local restaurants, ask for directions on the street. That should give you a decent vibe about the neighborhood.

    Cultural reinforcement makes racism difficult to eradicate. Jerks are free to travel anywhere, but location does make a difference. Blatant racism is ugly, but subtle, smile-in-your-face racism is equally destructive and insidious. Usually it's easier to change your neighborhood than your work environment, and that's where I would put my first discernments.

  11. #11
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    Segregation by economics is often the case in many big cities, NYC included. Segregation by choice is equally influential in the racial mix (or lack there-of).

  12. #12
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Ninjahedge Wrote:

    "But as tolerant as it is, it is VERY segregated. Within 3 blocks you go from one neighborhood to the next. The easiest example is Little Italy to Chinatown."

    Those neighborhoods are not segregated at all. There are chinese and whites living right next to eachother. Haven't you notice it? It use to be back in the 1800's but in 2004 it is not.

    Now...Other neighborhoods in Queens and in Brooklin might be...but that is changing as well. I think the more segregated is Staten Island though.

  13. #13

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    fioco: Actually, i think that based on cost, and general outlay, that I have found at least some general ideas of where to live (i'm always open to suggestions though). Bay Ridge looks to be one of the cooler spots in my opinion, simply because I have kids, and there is the distinct possibility of having to work in NJ (I'm a techie) if I stay with my current company. Of course there are other neighborhoods in other boroughs, but that one is probably tops on my list. So what I am planning on doing is going to different spots to get a vibe, in order to narrow it down, and drive around some of the neighborhoods at night. Then, of course, cost is always the ultimate factor (and what my wife wants!!)

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    Bay Ridge is niiiice. It's one of the few neighborhoods that's both good quality and (mostly) affordable; the problem is nobody really wants to leave so there's rarely an opportunity to get in on the action (residentially at least). I hope you find a nice place there.

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