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Thread: Harlem Renaissance

  1. #196
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    12 floors, 43 units. Design by Magnusson Architecture & Planning.

  2. #197
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Looks like it's replacing a bunch of taxpayers, so overall a good development.

    Just like to see more height and more units. It's on a wide street right on a subway line.

    NYC Planning...

  3. #198
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    I don't get it, we build 5 story buildings next to the train station and 23 story buildings 5 blocks from it. Hudson Yards, mainly 1 subway station, I know it's big, will that entire area. Hudson Yards and it's neighbors are great, love it but the logic is strange.

  4. #199
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    If you lived next to one of those subway lines and someone tried to build one of these monstrosities next to you, you'd get it. Did you know kittens turn into vampires without sunlight and that anything taller than 4 stories blocks sunlight entirely? I bet you did not.

  5. #200
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Harlem's Turreted Circus Castle Is Getting a Big Makeover

    by Hana R. Alberts



    Harlem's Bailey Mansion made headlines in 2009 when the 1888-built home at 150th Street and St. Nicholas sold for 75 percent off its asking price of $10 million. It took a few years, but the former residence of circus mogul James A. Bailey (yes, as in Barnum & Bailey) is now in the process of getting gussied up. That process starts not with the nine-bedroom interiors rife with historic details but rather with the century-and-a-half-old slate roof on top of the limestone castle.

    Harlem Bespoke spotted a rundown of the restoration process on contractor Short Slate's website, which includes photos and details of the painstaking process. "It's a dramatic limestone castle, complete with turrets, Flemish-inspired gables, porches, balconies, 66 windows – and a complicated slate roof that was in dire need of repair following years of standing empty," writes Short Slate's Chris Short. "My team and I restored the roof to its original Victorian design patterns, with copper valleys, intricate cresting and an impressive copper finial (to replace the original, which had been blown off in a storm a few years earlier)."



    The Bailey Mansion's history is extensive, earning an entire "Streetscapes" column in the Times. New York magazine called it "Manhattan's 'Grey Gardens'" and got a coveted video tour.



    The once-leaky roof aside, husband-and-wife mystery owners sure have a lot on their plates. The mansion was used as a funeral home for many years and was apparently "overrun by a pack of wild dogs." Eep. But they no doubt have a beautiful slate on which to build: here's a peek of the interiors, circa 2009 when it was sold.





    The Bailey Mansion [Short Slate]
    Bespoke: Artisan Restoration at Bailey Mansion [HB]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...g_makeover.php

  6. #201
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Perhaps the only downside would be for the Circle Line, which might have to be renamed the Semicircle Line.




    For a Harlem renaissance, fill in the river

    Altering the waterway would allow a tremendous opportunity for development.

    By Charles J. Urstadt

    The de Blasio administration is poring over zoning maps, looking for places where New York City could grow. But rezoning risks community opposition and won't satisfy the demand for housing, commercial space, schools and parks. Decking over rail facilities, as is being done at Hudson Yards, is expensive.

    There is, however, another way to create hundreds of acres of development space in Manhattan that isn't as far-fetched as it sounds: Fill in the Harlem River.

    Altered by man so long ago that we think of it as natural, the Harlem River is anything but. The waterway on the Manhattan-Bronx border is actually a tidal estuary. Before the Civil War, it was a meandering inlet at the bottom of a deep gorge, heavily forested on both sides. Mid-19th-century politicians, developers and civil engineers decided to create a shortcut between the Hudson River and the Long Island Sound, and in 1904, the Harlem River was dredged, straightened and connected to the East River.

    Railroad and highway construction later spurred a flourish of industry along the river, but this was mostly over by the Great Depression. And the price is with us to this day: Residents of Upper Manhattan and the Bronx are cut off from their waterfront.

    It doesn't have to be this way. A public-works project to return the waterway to its natural state would create thousands of construction and permanent jobs. Filling in the Harlem River, which is seven miles long and on average more than 400 feet wide, while leaving room for a beautiful stream in the center, would create 400 to 800 acres of land—four to eight times the size of Battery Park City. Planners would have a free hand to dream big about the kinds of development New York needs most.

    The anchor for this new district could be the modern, spacious convention center that New York has never had. (Each year, trade shows and expositions that would naturally choose New York reluctantly go elsewhere for lack of an appropriate venue here.) This convention center would be a magnet for hotels, restaurants and retail facilities. All of this would be contiguous to Manhattan and convenient to highways, subways and commuter rail lines.

    But this vast space could house much more than a convention center. This Harlem River Valley would also lend itself to the construction of a university campus, which would draw internationally renowned institutions like Stanford or MIT in the way that Cornell University was lured to Roosevelt Island. Columbia and NYU are also seeking to expand.

    The possibilities don't end there. New York's thriving technology industry demands large, loftlike spaces. This new acreage could provide them. And housing should be part of the mix. The renaturalized valley could accommodate thousands of apartments for New Yorkers of all income levels and schools for their kids. Light rail would link these facilities and communities to one another and to nearby transportation infrastructure.

    For me, the most alluring part is the chance to create a large, beautiful park. Starting with a blank slate, the best designers in the world could compete to build a 21st-century analogue to the works of Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux.

    Having presided over the creation of new land both with fill and with platforms, I can attest to the dramatically lower cost of the former: At Battery Park City, landfill cost $25 per square foot, while deck space was $240. The Harlem River site would also lower building costs citywide by providing an inexpensive place to dump soil excavated from construction projects, which is currently trucked as far as Pennsylvania.

    There is also a hugely beneficial financial alchemy possible when government creates acreage with landfill.

    Because the land itself would be owned by the city, then rented (most likely for 99 years) to developers, the income stream would help pay for schools, parks and other amenities. It would support a bond issue so that the project could be completed with no government expense or increase in public debt.

    Moreover, as land values (and the ground rents they command) rise over time, this project would generate surplus income for the city treasury. The agency I founded, the Battery Park City Authority, now hands the city more than $125 million per year in excess revenue.

    In a call for renewed public investment in infrastructure, President Barack Obama recently invoked the legacies of Abraham Lincoln (who oversaw the Transcontinental Railroad) and Dwight D. Eisenhower (who launched the Interstate Highway System). If Mayor Bill de Blasio were to heed the president's call by pledging to spark this new Harlem renaissance, it would also mark a historic return to New York's golden age of monumental public works.

    Perhaps the only downside would be for the Circle Line, which might have to be renamed the Semicircle Line.

    In short, undoing centuries of meddling in the natural state of the Harlem River Valley could spark an economic and cultural resurgence in the communities that line the river and greatly benefit the city as a whole. What are we waiting for?

    Charles J. Urstadt, a former state housing commissioner, chaired the Battery Park City Authority from its inception to 1979 and was vice chairman from 1998 to 2010.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...l-in-the-river

  7. #202

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    I'll have what he's smoking.

  8. #203

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    Great idea. Backward progress in a way, but still the right direction. If you know what I mean.

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