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Thread: Harlem Renaissance

  1. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfenn1117 View Post
    Here's the plans for the rumored W Hotel in Harlem

    That's scary ugly...

  2. #47
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    ^ I think the materials might look good, but the design of that building looks bad.

  3. #48

    Default African Market 116th between 5th and Lenox

    Does anyone know when the market will close on 116th street? It was supposed to close this month, but it is still open. I am hoping for some fabulous coops/ condos in it's place!!

  4. #49

    Default 2 suggestions to improve the plan for 125th street

    I have two suggestions for Harlem - what do people think?

    The first deviates from my usual capitalism rants - I think the city should help relatives of emergency room cases at Columbia Presbyterian stay at these hotels by giving the hotels a height bonus if they agree to reserve a few rooms each night for last minute emergency room bookings. Not only would we get nicer buildings that were taller this way, it just seems wrong to make it so hard for sick relatives to visit their loved ones by making them trek to Westchester or midtown for a room.

    I actually think the city should help these hotels build parking lots here. 125th street is the closest major commercial artery to the Triborough Bridge, making these hotels the closest descent lodging to visit about 3 million people and a large number of businesses. In otherwords, I don't think the hotel owners should assume their guests are visiting Manhattan and looking for a cheap room, when they might be visiting someone in the Bronx or western Queens or upper Manhattan.

  5. #50
    Senior Member Dynamicdezzy's Avatar
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    Rezoning Plan May Transform Area of Harlem
    By ELIOT BROWN
    Special to the Sun
    October 15, 2007

    A D V E R T I S E M E N T


    A D V E R T I S E M E N T

    The Bloomberg administration is seeking zoning changes that would allow for substantial new development along much of 125th Street, a move that could transform a major Harlem thoroughfare into a dense hub of activity.

    After avoiding the area for decades, developers are warming to the corridor as its retail market flourishes and nearby housing prices reach levels that 15 years ago would have seemed almost unfathomable. Aiming to leverage the soaring real estate market, the city wants to convert the historic corridor into a regional destination for business, retail, and the arts, allowing for an estimated 2,300 new apartments and more than 600,000 square feet of office and retail space in coming years. The plan, which goes before the local community boards in coming weeks, has drawn criticism from neighborhood residents, who say the dense development will not fit in with the character of the area. The real estate industry, while it supports the plan, is calling for more density around the Metro-North station on Park Avenue, consistent with the city's goals of transit-oriented development.

    The concept of new development is a relatively recent one for the expansive African American and Hispanic area that occupies much of northern Manhattan. Between the 1960s and 1980s, the region was hemorrhaging population as the city's economy faltered, so much so that the city claims in planning documents that due to widespread foreclosures, it owned about 40% of the housing stock at one point.

    The seemingly unstoppable real estate market of the past decade has shone a new light on the area, especially 125th Street, allowing for the arrival of national retailers such as Old Navy, and developments such as the planned Harlem Park, a glass 20-story office building just west of Park Avenue being developed by Vornado Realty Trust.

    For the past four years, the city has been talking with the community and devising its rezoning plan for the corridor, which stretches between Frederick Douglass Boulevard and Second Avenue and 124th and 126th streets. Now, with the rezoning proposal at the start of the seven-month approval process, the Bloomberg administration is poised to open the area's doors to considerable new development, particularly for office space and arts and entertainment uses.



    http://www.nysun.com/article/64548

  6. #51
    Senior Member NewYorkDoc's Avatar
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    Heres the second page to the article posted above...

    Rezoning Plan May Transform Area of Harlem

    By ELIOT BROWN
    Special to the Sun
    October 15, 2007

    [Continued from page 1 of 2]

    "Folks want to build higher right now," Assemblyman Keith Wright said. "You have some rather large vacant lots that are being held onto by private developers, and they're just waiting for the proposed rezoning."

    The city's plan would allow for more than double the existing density along the central section of 125th Street, with new buildings allowed to rise to 29 stories. With the aim of further enlivening the street life of the corridor, the proposal would restrict the type of retail on the ground level to "active" uses, relegating much of the space for banks and offices to the second floors.

    New buildings bigger than 60,000 square feet would have to reserve a portion of their space for entertainment or arts uses along much of the street, and the city is considering a density bonus for buildings that incorporate arts uses.

    With rising land values of recent years causing a stir within the broader Harlem community — opposition has been stiff to Columbia University's planned 17-acre expansion and housing advocates claim evictions from landlords shedding rent-regulated tenants are at an all time high — the city has had to walk a fine line while crafting the proposal. The area in which the
    proposed density is greatest tends to be mostly filled with low-rise retail stores, and the city added development restrictions to the sections of the corridor with considerable residential population. Still, the community has expressed concerns, proposing its own alternative that would decrease allowable building heights and expand provisions for arts and entertainment.
    "I don't want a 42nd Street — I don't want a lot of tall high rises," Council Member Inez Dickens said, calling for a height limit of about 19 stories.

    The real estate industry, mostly content with the city's proposal, is pushing for a greater density along the eastern end of the corridor, as the presence of the Metro-North stop, the nos. 4, 5, and 6 trains, and the proposed Second Avenue subway make the area very attractive for development.
    "We thought that they could have given greater density as you got closer to the Metro-North station and the subways," the president of the Real Estate Board of New York, Steven Spinola, said.
    Both the City Planning Commission and the City Council must approve the plan.


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    I really like the idea of banks being on the second floor. That is what should have been done from the beginning of the invasion of banks in Manhattan.

  7. #52
    Senior Member Dynamicdezzy's Avatar
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    ^Thanks!

  8. #53

    Default hotel and condos on victoria theater site

    Aside from someone whining about cutting the theater size, this project looks good. The victoria theater would have been a great place to finally build a permanent location for Cirque du Soleil if Pier 40 falls through, but sounds like it won't happen now.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/apps/pb...2/newsletter01

  9. #54
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    Does anyone know when the market will close on 116th street? It was supposed to close this month, but it is still open. I am hoping for some fabulous coops/ condos in it's place!!
    You wish to hasten the destruction of a culturally interesting and unique market so that some coops/condos can take its place? (which I guarantee you, in this development climate, won't be "fabulous") What's your problem, you have something against the city remaining vibrant and exceptional? Manhattan has lost enough of its soul without you wishing more of it down the drain.
    Last edited by MidtownGuy; November 2nd, 2007 at 03:46 PM.

  10. #55

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    with 3 blocks of housing projects that sit between 112th and 115th and run across 6 avenues, we need all the co-ops and condos that we can get on 116th street around 5th / Lenox... this will at least bring in more tax paying people into the neighborhood to balance it out!

  11. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by newyorkskater View Post
    ...this will at least bring in more tax paying people into the neighborhood to balance it out!
    Exactly, the new housing will provide for more income diversity.

    This is just the right thing for this part of Central Harlem.

  12. #57

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    But getting rid of a vibrant, unique market when we are so not needing additional units developed at this time?

    And, I am at a fairly high income level and I find your comments not too nice. We need alot of rich people to overcome the blight of the poor's presence? Projects are not all the same. Neighborhoods with projects are not all the same. I am much more comfortable up here than I am in certain areas of Chelsea where the gentrification/project issue seems to be about to explode (who thought that putting the Middle/Upper Lab School within a poorly performing public school was a good idea? And amidst the projects, no less).

    This is a GREAT community with low crime rates. The people I have contact with are lovely. I actually have conversations with the people at Duane Reade up here, rather than the grunts I get downtown. I am NOT anti-development in the slightest, but please spare me the "need" to minimize the awful presence of the poor.

  13. #58

    Default projects hurt poor people IMHO

    pricedout, there is a need for some public housing, but New York harms itself by having too much of it. Here's what the problems with it are, and why the working poor are hurt by it:
    1) drain on tax revenues that could be spent better on schools and middle class tax relief - things the working poor really need like reduced sales taxes and improved education, crime prevention, public health programs, etc
    2) public housing is of poor quality, hence the asthma issues in the other thread

    A paradox I see among New Yorkers who advocate affordable housing is that they seem to be desiging a city that in fact is designed to push out the poor. Its cities in the red states that provide adequate deregulation of housing markets that manage to solve the problem - they provide market rate housing at affordable prices that makes sure the working poor can live a good life in conditions with dignity.

    If we build market rate housing in Harlem, the supply will rise and prices will stabilize. And all of that now taxable property revenue would go to improving city services and reducing taxes.

    You need some public housing, but 14000 units in such a small area like East Harlem is counterproductive to anyone but the politicians who want a reliable voting base dependent on government patronage.

  14. #59

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    I definitely agree with you that our earlier decision to create projects was an awful one. Affordable and low-income housing needs to be integrated. BUT I can't imagine what it would feel like to be a resident of such a complex and read some of the comments from people who are thinking about "raising up the neighborhood."

    I was really (over)reacting the the notion that we would need to close this market just to try to up the "good" numbers to compensate for the "bad."

  15. #60

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    Investordude, at this point decent market rate housing in Manhattan isn't within reach of the middle class, much less the lower-middle class or the poor. You can argue that in a market-based economy such people don't necessarily deserve to live in New York (I'm not necessarily saying that YOU would), but just last night I was riding a subway and musing with my daughter about my stop when a charming man (with very few teeth, not definitely an economic indicator, but probably so) spoke up to give me some (correct) advice and we spoke for the next ten or so minutes before our stop..

    I like this (not the fact that he can't afford proper dental care) but that I live in a wonderful community with so many different people, with so much to offer. It obviously strikes me as ironic that the neighborhoods that I so enjoy (LES, Harlem, Alphabet City) are the ones that I will be gentrifying by three (the size of our family) at a time if we move there. I wouldn't have given it another thought fifteen to twenty years ago, there were plenty of fun and funky neighborhoods (and I lived in Hell's Kitchen, a sketchy area of the UWS and a great block in Hispanic Chelsea). Not so anymore.

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