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Thread: Demolished/Destroyed

  1. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tectonic View Post
    I keep asking myself and I think I said it here before. Could we have kept these buildings and built new buildings in other locations?
    IMO the answer is usually yes, but keep in mind that the best buildings were built on the most desirable plots of land. There were so many plots available for the empire state building, but they chose 5th & 34th and bulldozed the original Waldorf Astoria instead of some other less desirable block with crappy buildings


  2. #137
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    It's sad though.

  3. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tectonic View Post
    I keep asking myself and I think I said it here before. Could we have kept these buildings and built new buildings in other locations?
    Developers build on the land they own so no. Not unless you want the government to mandate this 100%.

  4. #139

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    Deleted more photos.

    Capitol21: Did you read my post 134, and the last PM I sent you explaining off-topic posts and thread hijacking?

    If you persist in ignoring me, you're going to get infractions.

  5. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    Ornament and Crime

    Ornament and Crime is an essay written in 1908 by the influential and self-consciously "modern" Austrian architect Adolf Loos under the German title Ornament und Verbrechen. It was under this challenging title that in 1913 the essay was translated into English: "The evolution of culture marches with the elimination of ornament from useful objects", Loos proclaimed, thus linking the optimistic sense of the linear and upward progress of cultures with the contemporary vogue for applying evolution to cultural contexts.

    In the essay, Loos's "passion for smooth and precious surfaces" informs his expressed philosophy that ornamentation can have the effect of causing objects to go out of style and thus become obsolete. It struck him that it was a crime to waste the effort needed to add ornamentation, when the ornamentation would cause the object to soon go out of style. Loos introduced a sense of the "immorality" of ornament, describing it as "degenerate", its suppression as necessary for regulating modern society.

    The essay was written when Art Nouveau, which Loos had excoriated even at its height in 1900, was about to show a new way of modern art. The essay is important in articulating some moralizing views, inherited from the Arts and Crafts movement, which would be fundamental to the Bauhaus design studio and would help define the ideology of Modernism in architecture.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ornament_and_crime
    What is it with these Austrian architects that came here and brought a disdain of ornamentation with them. Richard Neutra also came from Austria to the US in 1923 and basically founded the Caifornia Modernism aesthetic of architecture. I'm all for new designs and ways of thinking, but IMO ornamentation is the single biggest deficiency of in current architecture. Craftsmanship is dead

  6. #141

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    I finished the work at my webpage about the World Building.
    I hope, my English is acceptable. You are invited to visit it here:
    http://theworldbuilding.blogspot.com/



    Credits: I think I found this picture in the collection of the NYPL Digital Gallery.

  7. #142

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    ^

    Thank you Schaedel.

    You have gone into great detail on your World Building web page.

    I really enjoyed reading through it.

  8. #143
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    Yes Schaedel - great work - it is greatly appreciated what you have done in assembling your historical archive. I saw photos and prints I never saw before.

    Bravo!

  9. #144
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Singer Building under construction:



    larger version at Shorpy

  10. #145
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The Star Theater stood at 844 Broadway, just south of Union Square, from 1861 to 1901 ...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    In 1902 it was taken down brick by brick, captured by American Mutoscope and Biograph in time lapse:


  11. #146
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    716 5th Avenue .


    A Bank Lives On in Memory and Metal

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    Q. I recently bought a replica of a bank on eBay, and believe it was at the corner of Grand and Norfolk Streets. Do you have a turn-of-the-century source you could check?...
    Howie Gelbtuch, Manhattan

    A. Jackpot! The bank you have is definitely modeled after the State Bank’s impressive neo-Classical-style headquarters of 1902 at 374 Grand Street, near Norfolk. Founded in 1890, the State Bank took as its motto “Strong as the Rock of Gibraltar.”

    The State Bank had high architectural ambitions; the Roman pomp of its limestone front stood well apart from the 19th-century brick tenements of its immigrant neighborhood. It was an unusual commission for the architect Michael Bernstein, who was better known for tenements and small apartment houses — more than 100 in 1901 alone.
    In 1906 the State Bank built a matching annex around the corner on Norfolk, and also turreted branches at Fifth Avenue and 115th Street, no longer standing, and on Stone and Pitkin Avenues in Brownsville, Brooklyn.

    These and other branches are pictured on the photograph search portal of the Web site of the Museum of the City of New York.

    Despite its classical grandeur, the State Bank was subject to the usual vicissitudes of finance. In 1905 The New York Times reported that “a nonsensical panic” had gripped the depositors at the Grand Street branch and that the police had taken their billy clubs to an unruly crowd of depositors anxious to get their money out. Three officers were swept aside as “as if they were so many tin soldiers,” and the crowd pushed an iron railing down into the areaway.

    The bank paid out $80,000 in claims, and one woman took off her flannel underskirt to make a sack for her 1,085 silver dollars. A man’s trousers “jingled like a flock of sleigh bells.” Some depositors returned with their savings within hours, but the bank refused to take them back.

    It relented the next day, when more depositors changed their minds about the wisdom of their withdrawals. The bank continued in operation for decades; its building was demolished in the the 1970s for a housing project.

    The 1902 State Bank as a photographer captured it in 1905.

    A Gem of a Jeweler’s

    Q. A 1911 photograph in your article about the Harry Winston building (“An Architectural Barometer,” Streetscapes, Sept. 4) showed a very interesting small structure next door, and I was especially interested in the awning over the doorway. Do you know anything about it?... Anthony S. Aiello, Philadelphia, Pa.

    A. Ah, the 1910 jewelry store of Schumann Sons, at 716 Fifth, was a luscious thing, an ivory-colored peignoir of marble and glass and iron.

    The Schumann firm arrived on a stretch of the avenue that was changing in ways unimaginable to the residential fortress of the 1890s. Trade was moving in, including the decorator Alavoine, who in 1907 built what was later the Rizzoli bookstore at 712 Fifth.

    Simultaneously, 714 Fifth was demolished for what became, by 1910, the headquarters of the perfumer Coty, with windows by René Lalique.

    Schumann Sons took the town house at No. 716 and cut it down to two stories, which alone would have made it stand out on a street of four- and five-story buildings. But the jewelers had in mind a toy box for royalty, with a gleaming marble front, an iron balcony and a splayed arch above the second floor.

    Marquees were common between 1900 and 1919, but Schumann’s was a particularly exuberant work. The sinuous metal and glass structure was perhaps 12 feet wide. Its glass lozenges, held in place by steel or bronze struts, curved both right to left and fore to aft, suggesting swaying eelgrass.

    The architect? That was Maynicke & Franke, a firm known for tall quotidian loft and business buildings. Perhaps the jeweler asked for a copy of some French storefront; in any event, Schumann’s was a late irruption of the high French style, which had peaked just after 1900.

    The silky little building and its ilk met with a few brickbats. The Chicago architect George Maher was of the opinion that New York had become “enslaved by the spirit of the French.”

    “Take the St. Regis Hotel,” he said in a 1906 speech reported in The Real Estate Record and Guide. “There’s nothing American about it. A Frenchman put down in the lobby wouldn’t know he had left his own country. It destroys Americanism in the Americans who stop there.”

    The St. Regis, at Fifth and East 55th Street, went up in 1904.

    The gowns of architectural fashion change in an instant. Schumann left its un-American monument in 1914, and in 1915 a bank remodeled the exterior in the classical style, followed by another reconstruction in 1939 for James Robinson, the silver firm.

    That building fell in the 1980s for the present 712 Fifth Avenue tower, which preserved the facades of 712 and 714.


    The jewelry store of Schumann Sons with its distinctive
    glass marquee, stood from 1910 to 1914 at 716 Fifth Avenue.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/23/re...qrylzJgaqa0phX

  12. #147

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    As if the box known Merchandise Mart wasn't detested enough already but I found out it replaced the Jerome Mansion, which was landmarked and still allowed to be destroyed.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome_Mansion


    It was home to the Union League Club of New York.
    They were once also in this beautiful building on Fifth Avenue and thirty-ninth street that was also demolished.

    NYPL
    http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypld...20&pNum=&pos=9

  13. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schaedel View Post
    I finished the work at my webpage about the World Building.
    I hope, my English is acceptable. You are invited to visit it here:
    http://theworldbuilding.blogspot.com/

    Credits: I think I found this picture in the collection of the NYPL Digital Gallery.
    Great work.



    What were people thinking in the 60's. I can only hope Pace and the brutes around the civic center and will be replaced one day. That area is disconnected and ghastly.

    The American Tract Building seems to be getting a nice polishing, it's under some construction netting now, but parts of the roof have been uncovered and it shines like new. And next up we'll see the Temple Court Building restored. I hope one day Nassau will be a beautiful pedestrian only high street.

    Last edited by Derek2k3; October 31st, 2011 at 02:41 AM.

  14. #149
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    Random musings; Some of these old former buildings are really a sight to behold. It's a shame that they couldn't have been preserved somewhere, if even out in a field somewhere upstate having been moved stone by stone. Visiting Philadelphia, you can see some of these old buildings that have survived the tides of redevelopment that regularly sweeps any and all valuable parcels of land in Manhattan. And then you visit a place like London where anything that isn't 500 years old is considered new. Yes, notable buildings should be preserved, but the take away for me is not so much what is lost, but how undeserving the sad excuses for replacements generally are

  15. #150

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    Agreed. It's the replacements that makes these cuts burn a little more. The Tribune Building was replaced by Pace and the World Building by a traffic ramp. They were both once the tallest buildings in the world.

    If those two newspaper towers were still here, the Singer never demolished, and the WTC still standing, one would have been able to see 6 of the former world's tallest buildings just by standing in City Hall Park.
    Last edited by Derek2k3; November 1st, 2011 at 09:44 AM.

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