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Thread: Demolished/Destroyed

  1. #166

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    This is a thread where I think a photo like this will be well appreciated. Taken yesterday while driving through the central park traverse at West 96th street…….


  2. #167

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    Tonight (2/18) PBS' American Experience is premiering the documentary The Rise and Fall of Penn Station.

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    Good show.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BenM View Post
    Tonight (2/18) PBS' American Experience is premiering the documentary The Rise and Fall of Penn Station.
    Sounds like a gut-wrenching watch.... American Experience does an amazing job with these documentaries. I always try not to speak in absolutes but the one they did on Walt Whitman is one if the greatest entertainment assemblies I ever laid eyes/ears on; sheer brilliance.

    I will try not to blubber at the end of this one.

  5. #170

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    I found the documentary thoroughly disappointing. Nearly 40 minutes out of the 51 minute running time was devoted to the construction of the tunnels. The decline of the building, the demolition and the fight to save it, and the impact it had on the preservation movement and Landmarks Law went virtually undiscussed. It felt like an episode of History Channel's Modern Marvels.

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    Default Pennsylvania RR Exchange Place Passenger Station – Jersey City 1894

    This a little bit related to before the tunnel and Penn Station NYC. Before they built the tunnel under the Hudson to the new Pennsylvania Station in NYC, train passengers from the south of New York had to disembark their train, take a connecting ferry, and then reconnect with a train in Manhattan going to parts north and to Boston.




    https://archive.org/stream/sheppsnew...e/n91/mode/2up





    http://furnesque.tumblr.com/post/34850191832/jersey-city-ferry-terminal-pennsylvania-railroad

  7. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    When Spain Reigned on Central Park South

    NY TIMES
    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    STREETSCAPES | THE NAVARRO FLATS

    Attachment 12003

    THERE was only one developer who could give Edward Clark, the builder of the Dakota apartment house, a run for his money. That was José Francisco de Navarro, the Spanish-born entrepreneur of wide accomplishments and appetites, including real estate.

    His gigantic eight-building Navarro Flats complex, built on Central Park South in the 1880s, is long gone, but it was just as famous in its time as the Dakota — if for all the wrong reasons.

    Born in Spain in 1823, Mr. de Navarro graduated from the Spanish Royal Naval Academy and came to the United States to teach at a Jesuit college in Maryland. After a few years, teaching gave way to railroad investments, then insurance, and by the 1870s he had a number of successful enterprises, like providing $283,000 worth of water meters to the Tweed ring, as well as collaborating on a public market with Boss Tweed himself.

    In the early 1880s, the advent of co-op apartments attracted a new kind of builder. Previously, developers had either built and held for investment, or built for sale to a new owner, being paid after the fact. With the new co-ops, the developer began collecting money upfront from future tenant-shareholders, who provided a new source of investment funds.

    In 1882, Mr. de Navarro began a project twice the size of the Dakota, which was then in midconstruction. His was not one apartment house but eight in a mammoth complex facing Central Park. They took up the westerly end of the block bounded by 58th and 59th Streets, and Sixth and Seventh Avenues, a site that was 425 feet long and 201 feet deep.

    Although first called the Central Park Apartments, they soon became known as the Navarro Flats or, sometimes, the Spanish Flats.

    The buildings, each 13 stories tall, were named the Madrid, the Cordova, the Granada, the Valencia, the Lisbon, the Barcelona, the Saragossa and the Tolosa.

    The sales brochure for the apartments, most of them seven-bedroom duplexes, listed them at $20,000 for corner units and $15,000 for those with only one exposure. Maintenance was $100 to $200 a month.

    The architect, Hubert & Pirsson, staggered the floors so that the principal rooms, facing the street, had extra-high ceilings. It’s a comment on the times that the apartments had only two bathrooms each.

    There were some particularly large apartments, about 7,000 square feet, with a library measuring 19 feet by 22 feet, a drawing room 17 by 39, a billiard room 18 by 24, and a dining room 16 by 31. “Not 10 houses in New York” have such a scale of entertaining rooms, said The Real Estate Record & Guide.

    Unlike the cool beige brick and stone of the Dakota, the Navarro Flats buildings were hot-red brick set off against a wild cliff of stone-trimmed arches, turrets, gables and other features — an arrangement that Scientific American called “most unsatisfactory” in 1884. There were some Moorish details, but the buildings were also described as both Gothic and Queen Anne in style.

    The construction chronology is hazy, but it appears that the westernmost two buildings were completed in early 1884, the next two in 1885 and the last four several years after that.

    Mr. de Navarro was regularly reported to be involved in lawsuits and troubled business affairs, but in 1884 he filed plans for apartment complexes at 86th Street and Madison Avenue, and at 81st Street and Central Park West. That year, The Record & Guide said that the Navarro Flats “must have proved very profitable.”

    By 1885, however, the publication reported that there had been few sales and that there was “little doubt that the venture will prove to be the reverse of profitable.”

    The project required a second mortgage — and a third, which Mr. de Navarro could not get. The scent of failure was death to further sales or credit, and the mortgage holders were suing by 1886.

    In November 1888, The New York Daily Tribune reported the cost of each building as $2 million, and the complex was sold at auction, with at least two of the buildings still incomplete. The original shareholders lost their equity — or, as The Tribune put it, they had bought only “castles in the air.”

    The spectacular failure of the Navarro Flats put a damper on the nascent co-op movement, which suffered from its failure for years.

    Not that any stigma attached itself to living at the Navarro Flats. In 1890 the writer and reformer Carl Schurz lived in the Lisbon; Mary Mapes Dodge, the author of “Hans Brinker, or The Silver Skates,” lived in the Cordova; and Percy Chubb, the insurance executive, lived in the Valencia.

    Court battles relating to the project followed Mr. de Navarro at least to 1902, when disappointed stockholders won a suit against him for $950,000. That suggests he still had enough money to pay, and indeed in the mid-1880s he had organized a successful cement company, which seems to have occupied much of his time until his death in 1909.

    Beginning in 1926, Mr. de Navarro’s towering vision was sold off piecemeal, and the apartment buildings were replaced by the New York Athletic Club, the Essex House and the Hampshire House, leaving not a trace of those castles in the air.

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

    ***

    The Central Park Flats (aka Navarro Flats) in 1891:

    Attachment 12004

    From 1903 ...
    Printed on border: "A most imposing pile of intensely substantial buildings. Elaborated Spanish architecture, with Moorish arches, numerous balconies, grand entrances, and highly ornamented facades. Unsurpassed interior appointments. Apartments, single and double floor. Built for the wealthiest classes. Eight independent buildings. Built by Navarro, on co-operative plan. Owned by the James Jennings McComb Estate."





    https://archive.org/stream/sheppsnew.../n341/mode/2up


    The Hawthorne Co-ops, 128 CPS, left in the style of the Chelsea Hotel, Navarro Flats Co-ops (right), 150-160-170-180 Central Park South, Sixth to Seventh Avenue, 1894.

    Philip G. Hubert besides designing the Navarro Flats and the Hawthorne Co-ops was the architect of the Chelsea Hotel on 23rd Street in Manhattan.

    Here is another angle of the Navarro, photo 1894, also showing one of Philip Hubert other Co-op buildings on Central Park South or West 59th Street in some old references. The photo above shows “The Hawthorne” Co-op next to the Navarro. The other Co-op btw on CPS was “The Hubert” at 226-230 Central Park South, also in the style of "The Hawthorne" just west of the later built Gainsborough Studios at 222 CPS.


    http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/digi..._00000643.html
    Last edited by Statun-Ilandur; September 10th, 2014 at 12:45 PM.

  8. #173
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Broadway and Thomas Street, TriBeCa

    The "Thomas Twins" from 1869. Before its widening, Thomas Street was a lovely carriage drive leading to old New York Hospital (1773 - 1869) associated with near-by King's College, now Columbia. The twin on the left was over one hundred years old when it was demolished in 1971.


    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...tous_chain.php

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    Default SE Corner Fifth Avenue and E. Fifteenth Street - Haight House - Kensington Hotel





    The Haight Mansion, (No. 2 ? E. Fifteenth Street) from the early 1850s. was the original corner part of the Haight House Apartments (1870) of the still fashionable Fifth Avenue neighborhood just off Union Square. The new apartment buildings offered services like a hotel to a perhaps reluctant upper crust who saw the new apartment idea little different than the age old tenements of the poor. By the turn of century (1900) the apartment building was a new hotel setup from this advertisement illustration above (original copyright expired) from 1901. The building I believe got torn down in 1906.

    The original owner of the Haight Mansion – R. (Richard) K. Haight is listed as the “Proprietor” of the St. Nicholas Hotel on Broadway, one of the passengers lost on the ill fated steamer “Pacific” gone down in 1856.

    Some supporting links for your information:


    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...B266838A669FDE


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Pacific_(1849)


    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...B766838E649FDE
    http://books.google.com/books?


    id=L4o9AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA249&lpg=PA249&dq=%22r+k+haigh t%22+%22st+nicholas+hotel%22&source=bl&ots=DyBiT5g M1m&sig=UVKengSvd2j9Y0sJs54bauT7zEE&hl=en&sa=X&ei= LKgZVK-dL4WpogT8sICABQ&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22r%2 0k%20haight%22%20%22st%20nicholas%20hotel%22&f=fal se

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    Quote Originally Posted by avngingandbright View Post
    A while ago someone posted about the Coogan building, an 1876 building in the much-demolished Flower District; here's a picture.



    From the landmark designation report from the LPC.

    Replaced circa 2000 by:


    The Coogan Building was a beautiful building especially with all the brickwork. Had photos of it somewhere - lost over the years and w/many moves. Saw it many many years ago on a daily bus ride going uptown to Roc Center. When I saw scaffolding going up around it I thought to myself - great, they are going to give it a good well deserved clean up and restoration. Boy was I wrong.

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    I find it interesting when I go to Philadelphia, where you can see much of the same buildings still in existence that were long ago demolished in NYC. Less progress/development has spared them

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    I find it interesting when I go to Philadelphia, where you can see much of the same buildings still in existence that were long ago demolished in NYC. Less progress/development has spared them
    I lot of what Philly has it has by default. It has lost its share of the past but mostly from the Victorian era. The Eire Canal and the NJ Turnpike in their time helped sideline and backwater the place in a lot of ways. Which also adds to some of its unique charms at present. Am a native from there btw.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Statun-Ilandur View Post
    I lot of what Philly has it has by default. It has lost its share of the past but mostly from the Victorian era. The Eire Canal and the NJ Turnpike in their time helped sideline and backwater the place in a lot of ways. Which also adds to some of its unique charms at present. Am a native from there btw.
    It's amazing, because here in NYC old stock architecture is held in extremely high esteem and fetches a large premium especially near parks. In Philadelphia, there are old run down victorian town houses as far as the eye can see right across the street from Philly's Central Park (Fairmount). By now we would have rehabilitated all of those and they'd be going for millions

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    Nobody can stop you from starting your own redeveloped corner of the world overlooking the green or the views of the city. If you build it, others may follow. One thing I think that has to do with what you are talking about is the spacing thing. Manhattan is an island hemmed in on 22 square miles - supply and demand. Philly is spread out over 142 square miles, half of all NYC, with a population of one and a half million inside city/county limits.

    There is a lot of good building stock (bones) left in Philly but which side of the river the various areas of the Park are on matters a lot as to why some parts are redeveloped or gentrified. What makes me shake my head is that an area like Fishtown in the northeast river wards, which has little or no space for parking and widths 10 to 12 foot average in row houses I would say, is hot because is so close to public transportation close to downtown, along with walking distance to downtown and to I-95, for quick exit from the city north south or to the desired second home at the sea shore in southern Jersey.

    Gentrification in Philly is a matter of designated or targeted areas thought to be desirable or potential desirability. I can remember as a small child, and this dates me, when all those beautiful colonial era townhouses in Society Hill were tenements, a grimy slum, housing for dock workers and the red light tenderloin district. In Philly it is just a matter almost of throwing a dart on the map where all the local R/E brokers hang out to find the next equity profit area. With all those flat roofs on all those row houses in the 21st century. lots of potential, could generate a lot of electricity from solar power alone etc.

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    Default Charles Maverick Parker Mansion – later the Benkard Mansion SW Cor. 5th Ave and 15th




    (Image above) The Benkard Mansion, Later the Manhattan Club House. S.W. Cor. Fifth Ave. and 15th Street - 1865 - Watercolor by Abraham Hosier - From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York -
    http://collections.mcny.org/Collecti...XC58TL2RL.html

    This is a companion image to the building (Box #174 above) in the 1850s, of the building that Mrs. Charles Parker ran society from, a generation before the so-called “The” Mrs. Astor of the 1880s and 1890s and her list of “400”. Supposedly it was this building in Brownstone that made that building material the desired city home sheathing for all future upper middle class and rich gilded age New Yorkers.

    In their day, Mrs. Charles Parker on the SW corner of 5th Ave and 15th Street was a competing social swan with Mrs. R. K. Haight in the Haight mansion opposite on the SE corner of 5th Ave and 15th Street.

    Also home of the Manhattan Club from 1865 to 1890.

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