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Thread: Demolished/Destroyed

  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by Statun-Ilandur View Post




    The Haight Mansion, (No. 2 ? E. Fifteenth Street) from the early 1850s. was the original corner part of the Haight House Apartments (1870) of the still fashionable Fifth Avenue neighborhood just off Union Square. The new apartment buildings offered services like a hotel to a perhaps reluctant upper crust who saw the new apartment idea little different than the age old tenements of the poor. By the turn of century (1900) the apartment building was a new hotel setup from this advertisement illustration above (original copyright expired) from 1901. The building I believe got torn down in 1906.

    The original owner of the Haight Mansion – R. (Richard) K. Haight is listed as the “Proprietor” of the St. Nicholas Hotel on Broadway, one of the passengers lost on the ill fated steamer “Pacific” gone down in 1856.

    Some supporting links for your information:


    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...B266838A669FDE


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Pacific_(1849)


    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...B766838E649FDE
    http://books.google.com/books?


    id=L4o9AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA249&lpg=PA249&dq=%22r+k+haigh t%22+%22st+nicholas+hotel%22&source=bl&ots=DyBiT5g M1m&sig=UVKengSvd2j9Y0sJs54bauT7zEE&hl=en&sa=X&ei= LKgZVK-dL4WpogT8sICABQ&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22r%2 0k%20haight%22%20%22st%20nicholas%20hotel%22&f=fal se


    Just found this:





    Hotel Kensington, Fifth Ave. near Washington Square – Photo by Byron Company (New York, N,Y,) – 1904 - From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York http://collections.mcny.org/Collecti...3XC53THVN.html

  2. #182
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    Default YMCA “52 E. 23rd St", Fourth (Park S) Ave and 23rd Streets 1869-1903




    Y.M.C.A. Building 1869-1903 – 52 E 23rd Street – 23rd Street and Fourth (Park S.) Ave – James Renwick Jr. Architect.

    The first built solely for the YMCA purpose building in the United States in New York City, as a “Christian Clubhouse”, was located at east 23rd Street, SE corner, and then Fourth (Park S.) Ave and finished in 1869.

    Built across from the National Academy of Design on the NW Corner of 23rd Street and present day Park Avenue South, the YMCA building had 40 artist studios for rent on the top two floors, 4th and 5th floors. Rent from the studios subsidized the mission of the "Y" as a Christian clubhouse with Library, Reading Room, lounges, classrooms, lecture rooms, large Auditorium, ground level and Gymnasium in the basement. Also some store fronts for rent on the NE corner frontage.

    That along the timeline some of the artists who rented studio space at "52 E. 23rd Street" NYC were:

    Edwin Austin Abbey
    Robert Swain Gifford
    George Henry Story
    Louis Comfort Tiffany
    Alexander Helwig Wyant

    YMCA General Secretary Robert Ross McBurney 1837-1898, studio apartment was in the top central tower room (23rd St. side).

    Recommended reading:

    http://www.amazon.com/Manhood-Factor.../dp/0816648352


    .

  3. #183
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    beautiful building, such a shame these gems were impossible to relocate instead of being torn down when the land became more valuable

  4. #184
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    Yup a lot of lost character.

  5. #185
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    50 Years Ago Today, This Grand Mansion Met a Wrecking Ball

    February 6, 2015, by Hana R. Alberts

    The Brokaw Mansion used to stand at the corner of 79th and Fifth, but 50 years ago today, demolition started. Built by Isaac Vail Brokaw, a clothing merchant with a rags-to-riches life story, the turreted home was modeled after a 16th-century Loire Valley chateau... even though it was completed in 1890. One of a stretch of Gilded Age mansions that lined the avenue at the time; it was nicknamed Millionaire's Row. (How quaint.) His son eventually inherited the main house, plus the three townhouses Brokaw the elder had built for each child.



    George Brokaw wanted to tear it down himself, but family members stopped him. But after his death, the historic homes ultimately sold to the Institute of Radio Engineers, which used them as office space. The institute then sold the parcels to a real estate developer, who (unsurprisingly) readied the wrecking ball in order to build a high-rise apartment building in 1964.



    The outcry over the impending demolition made headlines, in part because it piggybacked on the destruction of the old Penn Station. Though the mansion wasn't saved, it helped spark the passage of New York City's landmarks law, which is what preserves designated historic buildings and districts to this day. The law, too, turns 50 this year, and Curbed NY is going to devote special coverage to landmarks all year long. (Like mapping the first 38 landmarks ever.)


    It pretty much hurts to look at what's there today.


    Bye again, Brokaw Mansion—50 years later. At least you gave us the landmarks law.

    Brokaw Mansions [NYPAP]
    Brokaw House [New York Architecture]
    Flashback: The Brokaw Mansion [Gothamist]
    The Lost Isaac Vail Brokaw Mansion -- No. 1 East 79th Street [DiM]
    Streetscapes: The Wrecking Ball's Last, Uninhibited Dance [NYT]
    Looking Back at Manhattan's Lost Gilded Age Mansions [Curbed]
    Preserving New York: The City's Historic Landmarks Law Turns Fifty [In Collect]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/0...cking_ball.php

  6. #186
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    Seeing what replaced these gems is what bugs me the most.

  7. #187
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    It would have been interesting to still have a row of mansions longing the park. They would likely be in public hands at this point or run by businesses catering to the public

  8. #188

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    It would have been interesting to still have a row of mansions longing the park. They would likely be in public hands at this point or run by businesses catering to the public
    Yep, like the Carnegie mansion, today the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum.

    Modernism is a disease and a scourge meant to take all the joy, whimsy and romance out of life. Its practitioners (virtually any architect alive today) are ideologues of the worst sort and causing great harm to quality of life and society in general around the world today.

  9. #189
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    Default Circle Building - Columbus Circle NYC - James C Green, Architect - 1915



























    The Imperishable Presence of Citizen Hearst

    Two years after its (Maine Monument, Columbus Circle) dedication, Hearst began building the American Circle Building on the site now occupied by the Trump International Hotel and Tower. It was to be 30 stories but never got farther than two. Yet it contained a great secret, which came to light during demolition in 1966.

    Tucked inside the courtyard, invisible from surrounding streets and sidewalks, was another structure altogether — “a cameo Gothic cathedral,” The New York Times called it. Unable to solve the mystery, The Times passed on speculation that it might have been intended as Hearst’s own office; or as a suite for the editors of The American, one of his papers; or even that it had been fitted up as a private chapel for Davies. Who knows?

    Hearst was a man who got everything he wanted and then lost it. Maybe the chapel was something he couldn’t get or something he lost. Anyway, it wouldn’t have explained anything. I don’t think any room can explain a man’s life. No, I guess the chapel is just a piece in a jigsaw puzzle, a missing piece.
    Source: Atlantic Terra Cotta – V.2 1914 (Copyright Expired - Public Domain)

  10. #190
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    I actually did not know about the Circle Building...... Yet one more reason to detest the 60's.

  11. #191
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    The original One Times Square was extraordinary before it was "modernized" and then eventually walled over with advertising


  12. #192
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    ^^ Both great architectural losses. The ornamentation on and in the Circle Building is amazing.

    Thank goodness for photography. The Times photo is superb.

  13. #193
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    Priceless.

  14. #194

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    Both of those buildings were breadth taking.

  15. #195
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    Default Stanley Moving Picture Theatre - 586 Seventh Avenue - NYC - 1914



    Demolished in mid 1950s.

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