Page 8 of 16 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 238

Thread: Demolished/Destroyed

  1. #106

    Default

    But in all seriousness, are there any architectural salvage companies that collect these discarded ornamental bits? Or are they generally ground down to dust and reused? Or simply just dumped, to be found by archaeologists in thousands of years?
    It depends on the item and if someone is willing to pay the price for it at the moment its available, buildings come down fast, they can't take time out to carefully salvage a little finial worth $200 and allowing non-employees on site to grab stuff themselves is a legal liability and accident waiting to happen, as a result a lot was trashed with the buildings, especially exterior elements, and more especially huge blocks of stone that only had minimal carving on them if any.
    I've seen on Wall street when that 32 story bldg was demolished around 1974, a refrigerator sized stone lion keystone and 4 very large multiple piece granite figures representing Asia, Africa, America and Europe trashed with the rest of the rubble, they were far too huge and heavy and involved to do anything with.
    That lion weighed I would guess 10,000 to 14,000#

    A theater on 96th and Broadway, the Riverside and Riviera demolished in 1976 sported 2 huge stone lions on either side of the marquee, they were dumped in the hole for fill, they were too big, too heavy and were huge blocks of stone with only a somewhat simple lion mask carved on the face side. Can see it to the left of "temporarily closed" it had a curved top with a ball on top.



    In Chicago a guy named Richard Nickel in the 50s and 60s salvaged but only from buildings designed by Louis Sullivan, he had a large amount of huge scaled pieces, no one wanted any of it, so only what he took was saved. However, after he died in a collapse while salvaging, the city owned pier/warehouse where he had a large amount of stuff stored, had no use for the stuff and no one wanted it, so it was all trucked off and used as fill down by the lake shore, it's all buried there even now.
    Get the book on him "They all fall down" it's very good, lots of photos.
    He managed to save an entire room of the Chicago stock exchange building, it's restored in a museum, the exchange was the building he was in salvaging part of an iron stringer from the staircase the day before his wedding, they don't know exactly what happened, but apparently the floor collapsed under him after being weakened by debris and the weight of all the water soaking everything- used for dust control.
    They had to stop work and search for the body, it was weeks before they found him buried down in the basement level where all the debris had fallen.

    A few pieces that survived that had been stored elsewhere, have appeared on a salvage site for sale at insane prices, hundreds of dollars for a small plaster molding, 4 figures for some terra cotta blocks that were fragmented parts of larger cornices and assemblies.

    But now it's even crazier with prices on what is saved, it's to the point now where a sculptor could literally hand-sculpt new ones in clay for less.
    Last edited by UrbanSculptures; January 12th, 2011 at 12:42 AM.

  2. #107

    Default

    Does anyone remember the Penn Arcade in 33rd Street (between 6th and 7th) or did I imagine it? In the early 1970s, I clearly remember my dad taking me into a mid-block high ceiling shopping arcade as you might find in London or Milan. Can't find any photos of it on the net. This isn't the Arcade in the old Pennsylvania Station, but the mid-block on a side street Penn Arcade. Also, wasn't there a Greeley Arcade as well? Hoping that someone can confirm this or provide a photo -- so that I know I didn't imagine it. Thanks!

  3. #108
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    The Gimbels Passageway between 6th <> 7th to Penn is being rebuilt as part of the just-approved 15 Penn project that will replace the Hotel Penn.

  4. #109

    Default

    ^^ Preservation by way of destruction.

    I'm lost on this Gimbels Passageway. Does Vornado own it? If so, why can't they act like a responsible owner and fix up their property rather than hold it hostage to their desire to destroy one of the most famous/historic hotels in the city?

  5. #110
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default The Singer Building

    Just beautiful.

    And that slim white tower next to it ain't bad either, huh?



  6. #111
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Far West Village, NYC
    Posts
    927

    Default

    The slim white tower is a wing of the very unusually-laid-out City Investing Building which also came down for U.S. Steel/Liberty Plaza. Two lost treasures.




    Interestingly, the parapet in the illustration you posted was either not built or removed at some point.

    Rare color photo of Singer:


  7. #112

    Default

    Ornament and Crime

    Ornament and Crime is an essay written in 1908 by the influential and self-consciously "modern" Austrian architect Adolf Loos under the German title Ornament und Verbrechen. It was under this challenging title that in 1913 the essay was translated into English: "The evolution of culture marches with the elimination of ornament from useful objects", Loos proclaimed, thus linking the optimistic sense of the linear and upward progress of cultures with the contemporary vogue for applying evolution to cultural contexts.

    In the essay, Loos's "passion for smooth and precious surfaces" informs his expressed philosophy that ornamentation can have the effect of causing objects to go out of style and thus become obsolete. It struck him that it was a crime to waste the effort needed to add ornamentation, when the ornamentation would cause the object to soon go out of style. Loos introduced a sense of the "immorality" of ornament, describing it as "degenerate", its suppression as necessary for regulating modern society.

    The essay was written when Art Nouveau, which Loos had excoriated even at its height in 1900, was about to show a new way of modern art. The essay is important in articulating some moralizing views, inherited from the Arts and Crafts movement, which would be fundamental to the Bauhaus design studio and would help define the ideology of Modernism in architecture.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ornament_and_crime

  8. #113
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Randy, you can tell from the color photo of the Singer in your post that even by the 60's, some of its architectural details had already been stripped.

    Look at this close up photo in 1910 at the Singer's roof and parapet and you can see the difference.

    Look at this area in particular:


    Last edited by antinimby; October 10th, 2010 at 01:48 PM.

  9. #114
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Far West Village, NYC
    Posts
    927

    Default

    That's an amazing view down Broadway. It's interesting how the "Loos-ian" mindset took hold in the early 20th century and ornament was disdained & removed from buildings or demolished altogether (like the Downtown Post Office). I know there are scores of major buildings that have been similarly stripped of some ornament.

    I wonder what Loos would think if he were alive today - a time when once ubiquitous "ornamental" styles (such as neo-classic or neo-baroque) that he detested have been overcome & smothered by the "smooth & precious" he preferred.

  10. #115

    Default

    It seems that times haven't changed much and half-cooked ideas from people with psychological disorders were taken seriously back then too. He would have probably thought WW1 and WW2 were architectural bonanzas. So much ornamentation stripped! He would be MSG's greatest fan.

    History always provides stooges to give intellectual backing to wrong-headed movements. Loos anticipated the throwaway nature of buildings. Why ornament something that will be demolished anyway? In the 20th century we got throwaway architecture.

  11. #116
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Far West Village, NYC
    Posts
    927

    Default

    ^Well put!

  12. #117

    Default Page about the old Equitable Building



    It was time to reorganize my website about the Old Equitable Building (1870-1912).
    If you are interested, here is the link:
    http://theoldequitablebuilding.blogspot.com/

  13. #118

    Default



    World Building
    I try another way of presentation with the new page about the New York World Building.

    More the way I work at my German blog.

    But it takes a lot more time, because I have to
    translate most of the texts from German to English.

    The first chapters are online now. Just have a look:
    http://theworldbuilding.blogspot.com/

  14. #119
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default Streetscapes

    Mighty Buildings That Were No Match for Automobiles


    The German-American Insurance Company Building
    at Maiden Lane and Liberty Street, about 1908.
    The building's cornice was much admired.



    The Wolfe Building at Maiden Lane at William Street,
    as it looked in 1897. Like the insurance building,
    it was demolished in the 1970s.


    Q. We recently redesigned the Louise Nevelson Plaza at the intersection of Maiden Lane and Liberty and William Streets. What happened to the buildings that were there before the plaza was created? ... Henry Smith-Miller, Smith-Miller & Hawkinson Architects, Manhattan

    A. What happened? Well, as my doctor sometimes says, this may hurt just a little bit. There were two magnificent structures there, the fantastical Wolfe Building of 1896, by Henry Hardenbergh, along William Street, and the triangular German-American Insurance Company Building of 1907, by Hill & Stout, at the narrow end of the block.

    The Wolfe Building was put up by the estate of John Wolfe, one of the great hardware merchants of New York. The architect, Henry J. Hardenbergh, was often trusted by estates and family building operations, like that of the Rhinelanders.

    Hardenbergh’s 12-story building was a tour de force of early skyscraper design, in rich red brick trimmed with light-colored stone and terra cotta in patterns of the Flemish and Dutch Renaissance.

    Tall building design was an emerging and controversial field, and in 1896 the critic Montgomery Schuyler said Hardenbergh’s design proved that the skyscraper was “artistically tractable.” He praised the skyline of the Wolfe Building, particularly the angled facade on Maiden Lane, which gradually diminished, through complicated angles and recessions, into a spectacular gable perhaps 200 feet above the street.

    The Wolfe Building was soon hard to see, hemmed in by other structures, but the insurance building went up at the pointy end of the block, its angled bow giving it a shiplike presence, slicing through the chop of the older buildings. Frederick Hill, the architect, discussed it in the journal Architecture in 1908, noting “the omission of any form of cornice and the use of penetrated vaulting in its place,” referring to the polychrome terra-cotta elements at the top.

    Hill remarked that with the new crop of high buildings, the idea of making a traditional cornice, with intricate architectural patterns, “appears to us entirely wrong” and indeed “part of the problem over which we are all working.” Architects were rethinking almost every element of design as buildings got higher and higher. The new “A.I.A. Guide to New York City,” by Norval White, Elliot Willensky and Fran Leadon, calls the insurance building “magnificently corniced, wonderfully proportioned.”

    Both were demolished in the mid-1970s by Our Fair City to widen the streets and improve traffic flow to the new World Trade Center. Kent Barwick and Brendan Gill, both of the Municipal Art Society, protested, Mr. Barwick calling demolition “needless” in The New York Times in 1974.

    Although obvious candidates for landmark designation today, at the time such second-tier commercial buildings were considered interesting but not designation-worthy. Thus traffic won out, and the leftover land has for years been a favorite lunch spot, Louise Nevelson Plaza. The plaza does open up the view to the palazzolike 1924 Federal Reserve Bank, at the William Street end of the block, although that is scant consolation.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/05/re...ref=realestate

  15. #120

    Default Page about the Manhattan Life Insurance Building

    The MLIB page has been renewed.
    http://manhattanlifeinsurancebuilding.blogspot.com/

    You can find:
    1st a gallery about the early years showing the first look of the building (1894-1903)
    2nd a gallery about the late years showing the second look (1904-1930)
    3rd a gallery about the unknown years (1931-1963)
    A lot internet sources tell, that the building was demolished in 1930. But there
    was an aera after 1930.

    4th a gallery about the mysterious construction on the rooftop of the MLIB

    If you are interested, have a look
    http://manhattanlifeinsurancebuilding.blogspot.com/


    On this 1912 picture you see the second look of the MLIB with a wider dome on the roof on the right side of the picture.


Page 8 of 16 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 159 Joralemon St to be demolished
    By Clarknt67 in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 12th, 2011, 11:48 AM
  2. Hawks' Nest Is Destroyed
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: November 24th, 2010, 05:03 AM
  3. Historic N.J. Diner to be Demolished
    By amigo32 in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 22nd, 2007, 11:10 PM
  4. Bell Labs to be Demolished
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: September 20th, 2006, 12:20 PM
  5. Gehry Museum in Biloxi Destroyed by Katrina
    By lofter1 in forum World Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 16th, 2005, 01:28 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software