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Thread: Hugh O'Neill Building - 655 Sixth Ave - by Henry Hardenbergh - Renov. by Cetra/Ruddy

  1. #16

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    I don't think they did a good job on that penthouse block.

    I took photos of the area last year.
    http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/sh...2714#post32714

    http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/ladies_mile

  2. #17
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    To the left of the Greenwich in the old photo is the original Macy's.

  3. #18
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebrigham
    Regarding the penthouses, they will probably do the standard set back where it really isnt visible until you are several blocks away...
    This photo was taken from across the street and part of the penthouse structure is clearly visible -- and pretty darned unattractive at that.

    Unfortunately this building is outside a historic district so the owner got away with this.

    Fortunately the O'Neill building is within a historic / landmarked district so hopefully the set back mandated by LPC will make the addition far less visible.

    The trick for the architect at the O'Neill building is that most of the buildings along that stretch of 6th are about the same height, so once you move a block or so away from the building any additions will be clearly visible. Artistry will be required to make the additions to the O'Neill work.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    I don't think they did a good job on that penthouse block.
    You're right - it's terrible - they didn't even try.

  5. #20

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    I live in the building so I am a little biased. FWIW the very large protruding structure along 6th covers the water and cooling towers - and doesn't include the penthouses. The roof of the penthouses themselves provide enough area for a large common space with excellent views of downtown. I can take some pictures if anyone is interested. I consider them more bland than anything else. Considering The Oneill has more distinctive architecture (versus a more simple Greenwich design), the developers may have feared that an overly artistic penthouse complex would compete with the building below. But I speak out my arse.

    To be honest, when this building was redone 5-ish years ago, the area was significantly more gritty than it is now. And many of the buildings are still rundown and not maintained properly. Not to mention the several generic condos in the immediate vicinity - including a white bricker and a few very tired mid-rises that have seen better days. Basically, when criticizing the aesthetics of this 14th St corner, I am not going to point my finger at the greenwich, penthouse design notwithstanding. Overall, a great place to live and a nice impact on the community IMO.
    Last edited by ebrigham; August 27th, 2005 at 12:01 PM.

  6. #21

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    Fine.... but those boxes up there are still ugly.

  7. #22

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    I will pass it along!

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebrigham
    ...But I speak out my arse...
    It's a very articulate arse.

  9. #24

    Default The Oneill Building

    Beautiful building on the outside. Hopefully Elad does a better job than what everyone claims they are doing with the interior of the Plaza.

    www.theoneillbuilding.com

  10. #25
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Debris Falls on Historic Jewish Cemetery

    NY TIMES
    By PATRICK McGEEHAN
    June 9, 2006


    Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
    Debris that is thought to be mortar has fallen on the Congregation Shearith Israel
    cemetery on 21st Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues

    The redevelopment of a 19th-century department store in Chelsea into luxury condominiums has caused damage to one of the oldest Jewish cemeteries in New York, the final resting place for Jewish soldiers who fought in the American Revolution, among others, historic preservation officials said.

    A substance that appears to be mortar from the adjacent construction site is spattered over a few dozen tombstones in the cemetery, which is owned by the oldest Jewish congregation in the city, Congregation Shearith Israel.

    Shelly Friedman, a lawyer for the congregation, said that the damage was discovered this week and that an archaeologist was studying the material to determine what it is and how to remove it from the tombstones, some of which mark the graves of descendants of the first Jewish families to arrive in New York.


    Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
    The Congregation Shearith Israel cemetery
    on West 21st Street in Manhattan is one of
    New York City's oldest Jewish cemeteries

    "It's a big deal because the cemetery is very important to us," said Rabbi Marc D. Angel, the senior rabbi of the congregation, which is known as the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue. "We are highly sensitive to anything that happens in that cemetery."

    This is the third Manhattan cemetery built by this congregation. The first, opposite Chatham Square, was in use from 1682 to 1828; the second, on West 11th Street, from 1805 to 1829; and this one, on West 21st Street, from 1829 to 1851. There are more than 250 grave markers in the small cemetery, some of them five feet tall and ornate, others simple and flat and worn by time.

    Rabbi Angel said that the cemetery held the remains of three veterans of the Revolutionary War, two of whom died in 1784. It also has the grave of Harmon Hendricks, a prominent manufacturer of copper whose father, Uriah, was one of the 23 Jewish immigrants who founded the congregation.

    A descendant of Hendricks, Harmon H. Goldstone, was the first full-time chairman of the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission. He led a successful campaign to have the congregation's first cemetery designated as a national historic landmark.

    This week, the landmarks commission notified the department store site's developer, Elad Properties, that it bore responsibility for any needed cleaning and repairing of tombstones, said Diane Jackier, a commission spokeswoman.
    Ms. Jackier said it was mortar from the construction site that had fallen on the cemetery and adhered to the tombstones.

    Elad is renovating a 119-year-old building that wraps around the east and south sides of the cemetery. The five-story building, which takes up a block of the Avenue of the Americas from 20th Street to 21st Street, originally housed the Hugh O'Neill dry goods store.

    Elad, which also owns the Plaza Hotel, is dividing the space into luxury condominiums, including two floors of glass-walled duplexes at the top, priced at $7.5 million each and advertised as "castles in the sky."

    The renovation, which includes the restoration of large golden domes on two corners of the building, required the landmarks commission's approval because the property lies within the Ladies' Mile Historic District. As part of an arrangement with Elad, the congregation agreed not to build any structures in the cemetery that would block the windows of the new apartments.

    As part of that agreement, Mr. Friedman said, the developers are "paying for all the costs associated with the protection of the cemetery."

    A lawyer for Elad, Deirdre A. Carson, said she had worked closely with Mr. Friedman to monitor the situation and prevent any spillover from the site.

    "Construction sometimes, no matter how well-intentioned all the parties are, can result in unintended events," said Ms. Carson, a partner in the Greenberg Traurig law firm. Then she added, "I'm not saying that's what happened here."

    But Mr. Friedman and Rabbi Angel said they had heard no other explanation of where else the splattered material could have come from. Workers set up protective scaffolding on Tuesday to cover the tombstones closest to the building.

    Yesterday morning, construction workers were wheeling building materials across the roof of the O'Neill Building, about 75 feet above the cemetery.

    Rabbi Angel said he had not heard that any of the tombstones had been broken, but only that this "airborne material" had adhered to some of them and would have to be removed. He said that word of the problem had not reached most of the 600 families in the congregation, but that he expected them to take the news in stride.

    "This is the problem with having a cemetery in the middle of a bustling city," Rabbi Angel said. "It's hard to imagine that once this was a cemetery outside of town."

    He said that some of the graves had originally been in the congregation's first cemetery but had been moved farther uptown because the city wanted the land for a new street. Among the remains relocated in 1856, he said, were those of two soldiers who died in 1784, Daniel Gomez and Abraham Judah.

    Another veteran of the Revolutionary War, Isaac Nunes Cardozo, died in 1832, a few years after this cemetery was established, Rabbi Angel said.

    Copyright 2006The New York Times Company

  11. #26

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    The sheer number of excellent 'pre-war' buildings in NYC and areas that could styill use some re-habbing is astounding. Thanks for the photo tour.

  12. #27

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    Hello everyone, this is my first visit to this wonderful and informative site. Well, on a recent Sunday stroll around the Ladies Mile area, I noticed the landmarked cemetary behind The Oneill Building. Does anyone feel that views of grave markers from your bedroom or your living room would detract from the home experience? I ask because I noticed starting prices are in the lofty $1.3 million range... I suppose it's just personal preference. No disrespect to the Shearith Israel Cemetary or the congregation in any way.

    It's been a pleasure reading everyone's knowledgeable posts!

  13. #28
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Hey -- it's open space ^^ that will always be there -- in NYC thats GOLD.

    btw: you don't have to look down

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1
    in NYC thats GOLD.
    Right up till the Zombie Apocalypse. I hope that 1.3 mil pays for a 12-guage in addition to all the other perks.

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