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Thread: Atlantic City Seeks New Image: Las Vegas's

  1. #1606

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    At least the Boardwalk Pavilon above has a roof on it,unlike todays decrepit pavilons.

  2. #1607

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    Fix A/C?
    Mr. Ed can help.

    How about a bigger, better version of Lucy? Build her and they will come. It would be unforgettable.

  3. #1608

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    I believe the main problem with AC today is that the animals are running the zoo, and the Casinos want it that way.

  4. #1609

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    I found this quite interesting: (back in 2003)


    Best boardwalksYou've plowed through four paperbacks, gotten that all-over sunburn and have been worn out by the surf. It's time to stretch your legs on the boardwalk. Boardwalks have something for everybody, whether it's arcade games, carnival rides, mouth-watering junk food or simply people-watching. USATODAY.com's John Nunnally talked to Dr. Stephen Leatherman, director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at Florida International University and one of the nation's top beach experts (he's also known as "Dr. Beach"), about his list of the nation's top five boardwalks.
    There's no shortage of amusement on the Atlantic City boardwalk. By Chris Polk, AP

    1. Atlantic City
    "The granddaddy of all boardwalks, with amusement piers and the glitz of casinos right on the beach." For more information: www.atlanticcitynj.com.
    2. Ocean City, N.J.
    "The great view of the surf from this elevated wooden boardwalk brings you back to yesteryear." For more information: Ocean City visitor's guide.
    3. Rehoboth Beach, Del.
    "A small beach town that features a mile-long boardwalk and such favorites as Dolly's saltwater taffy and an amusement park." For more information: www.rehobothbeach.com.
    4. Ocean City, Md.
    "This honky-tonk three-mile promenade is easily traversed by the open train ferries as you inhale the smell of vinegar-soaked fries and pass the throngs of people." For more information: www.ocean-city.com.
    5. Virginia Beach
    "The most beautiful boardwalk in the country, featuring artwork and roving entertainers." For more information: www.vbfun.com.

    (not sure if I totally agree but it's interesting nonetheless)



    http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DG

  5. #1610

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    More competition for AC? From Luxist:

    Will Gambling Come To Miami Beach?

    The Fontainebleau Miami Beach hotel is currently finishing up a $500 million renovation but could there be plans for a casino in the venerable Florida hotel? The Miami Herald reports on a recent push to have the Florida constitution amended to allow gambling at the proposed Miami Worldcenter and any hotel in Miami Beach with more than 800 rooms, a restriction that includes only the Fontainebleau. It's a natural leap considering that a Fontainebleau casino in Las Vegas is already under construction.

    The new Fontainebleau in Miami Beach is set to open next month and follows the inclusive hotel paradigm of Las Vegas Strip hotels with 11 restaurants and bars, ample meeting space, 1,500 guest rooms, and a 40,000-square-foot spa. The developers have said that their plains for the Miami Beach hotel did not include casinos. The push for gambling in Miami comes from Miami developer who wants to put a casino in a commercial complex planned for the downtown area. But many feel that the Fontainebleau is the natural place for a casino in Miami Beach, it has the size and prestige to embrace gambling in a way that would add to the resort. And it could also bring a much needed infusion of cash to the South Florida resort economy.



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    "The Miami Herald reports on a recent push to have the Florida constitution amended to allow gambling..."

    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686 View Post

    Now you're really not getting it. Why would a place worthy of investment prompt its state to change its laws to allow gambling there? Why does a worthy place like that turn to casinos as its supposed panacea? I'll tell you: a place that knows it's in serious decline and fears that, without doing something drastic, will slowly die out until it vanishes into obscurity.
    -------------

    BTW: Note the architecture of that hotel. Besides being beautiful, doesn't it make more sense to have hotels with balconies (or at least open terraces) and windows that open, instead of the sealed glass office building type stuff they've built in AC?

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    Last edited by Fabrizio; October 1st, 2008 at 06:01 AM.

  6. #1611

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    Huge mistake! As we have seen gambling does nothing good for a city except provide taxes. States are taking the easy way out to generate tax dollars at the cost to its citizens. What ever happened to an honest days work, manufacturing, technology.

    I'm going to puke and then put in an honest days work.

    Why don't states just start selling drugs.
    Last edited by Intheknow; October 3rd, 2008 at 11:57 AM.

  7. #1612

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    I do not think gambling in Miami will come anytime soon, but then again I never thought it would ever be so wide-spread throughout the country. It was already tried in the early 90's when South Beach was a wreck (Trump was a big proponent on it. I believe both he and Wynn had options on hotels/land). Why start now when the city is just getting back to its roots again?

    If it passed (possibly under a gaming friendly governor Crist) I think gaming would fit in well at the Fontainbleau. It is a timeless well-thought out resort that under the recent renovations looks to capture a piece of its glory days. It is going to be a wonderful property (I was there checking out the construction just two weeks ago).

    Fabrizio, you are correct the balconies look great (that is the more modern phase II or III condo/hotel structure pictured above). The real beauty is in the original structure, which also includes balconies on the top (note the original design was lambasted until years later).



    But they would never work in modern-day AC casino hotel projects. The Taj and Showboat have a good amount of them, but they are locked. It is for fear of suicide by gamblers. I am not sure if this is a property imposed limitation or by the State.

  8. #1613

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    AGG what can you tell us about your stay at Chelsea?

  9. #1614

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    It was great.

    In answer to your questions, no, I did not see the rolling chairs but yes, there were people at the bar. Not many though (it was a Tuesday night...I could count them on my finger).

    The hotel seemed amply crowded. I stayed with a number of people for a convention that we were in town for. Everyone seemed to enjoy the place.

    Teplizkys was good, but not great (sorry folks, I forgot to check out the bathrooms). They need to vastly expand their menu and the service was very slow.

    The spa looks ready to open (and impressive) and construction was proceeding all over the place. Furniture was also being delivered for the "Lite" tower rooms.

    The real draw is Chelsea Prime. I love the feeling of the place and the food was simply amazing. I would argue the best steak house in the city. The place was very crowded too (I went here on Wednesday before I left the city, I do not recall an open table). If you get a chance to dine there, take some time to look around the room at the photos of AC past. They are quite amusing.

    Honestly though, I think the entire hotel is going to have a tough off-season with the economy slowing and all, but I sincerely hope they succeed. The product that they offer is unique and impressive and only adds back to the city.

  10. #1615
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    Why don't YOU tell us about these neighborhoods in the 1970's? What were they like.... what were your experiences there?
    Are you essentially calling me out on being too young to comment on this? I just graduated college this year, you know I wasn't around in the 70s.

    Simply put, I'm not going to reply to your posts if you think I had to have lived in Atlantic City, in the 70s, to make a credible argument.

  11. #1616

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    But you've already made a credible argument speaking from your own experience: that AC looks worse today then even when you were a kid, and that after 30 years of gambling AC now looks like a "ghost town". Back then, before gambling, as you say, it looked like: "A real place, postcard-worthy". But hey, as you mention, AC continues to lose population. I whole heartedly agree with you that one would expect that newer hotels "be integrated into (what's left of) the urban fabric". You ask: "How can this be fixed?" Personally, I think one step toward creating that "sense of place" that you find lacking, would be to eliminate those blank walls you see all over the place. Of couse to achieve that, it would mean government involvement to guide new development.... as is done in Cape May, as city that looks as you point out "busy, vibrant".

  12. #1617

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    They keep doing the same thing over and over again....AC Gateway has postponed buying any buildings they "purchased" until Nov. 2009, mean while the area gets trashier and trashier. Gardners basin development- the City wants the land back from developer due to absolutly nothing being built. This City is a waste.

    I'll guarantee Chelsea Hotel either goes under (likely) or is sold or taken over from Bashaw, soon. He can't even afford the rolling chairs anymore.

    How many Boardwalks are in the U.S.? If you owned one wouldn't you keep it up? Fn' monkeys running this city into the ground.

    More blank walls coming to AC real soon.

  13. #1618
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    But you've already made a credible argument speaking from your own experience: that AC looks worse today then even when you were a kid, and that after 30 years of gambling AC now looks like a "ghost town". Back then, before gambling, as you say, it looked like: "A real place, postcard-worthy". But hey, as you mention, AC continues to lose population. I whole heartedly agree with you that one would expect that newer hotels "be integrated into (what's left of) the urban fabric". You ask: "How can this be fixed?" Personally, I think one step toward creating that "sense of place" that you find lacking, would be to eliminate those blank walls you see all over the place. Of couse to achieve that, it would mean government involvement to guide new development.... as is done in Cape May, as city that looks as you point out "busy, vibrant".
    I guess I have to admit that I have no recollections whatsoever about Atlantic City as a kid. Maybe my parents took me there as a toddler, but I have no memories. I've only visited twice, both times after the Borgata opened. I also have to admit that my earlier posts were observations only, and not arguments. I had little knowledge about Atlantic City's history up until a few weeks ago when I started reading about the legalization of gambling and its aftermath.

    I've tried to pry this from you on a couple of occasions, to no avail, so I'll try again. What makes you think that casinos could have really saved Atlantic City? Before they arrived, the city had already lost 1/3 of its population. Keep in mind it's a small city - 11 square miles - so the wholesale abandonment of 1/3 of its housing stock would have led to disaster one way or another, unless the government literally bought up all the empty houses, policed, and maintained them.

    I still don't see how you can make a definitive argument about blank walls contributing to crime. Is most of the crime in AC taking place right outside the resorts? That seems to be the only logical explanation for the blank wall argument. Frankly, I don't find it surprising when the city has demographics like this:

    The median income for a household in the city was $26,969, and the median income for a family was $31,997. Males had a median income of $25,471 versus $23,863 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,402. About 19.1% of families and 23.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.1% of those under age 18 and 18.9% of those age 65 or over.
    Atlantic City is a poor, largely deserted resort town that thought it could hold on to its former glory by attracting casinos. It was a bad plan to begin with, blank walls or not; it got worse with the state mandating that all gambling take place within self-enclosed resorts. You have to admit there's something wrong with the idea that a small city of 40,000 can have a healthy economy when it bets all its chips on a single source of jobs - casinos. It's clear to me that Atlantic City is a failure not because of poor architectural planning, but because of poor economic planning. The reason why some Northern cities that were in decline were able to rebound was because they diversified their economies and attracted new industries, new jobs. How did Atlantic City respond to the challenge? By exclaiming, "Let's spin the roulette wheel!"

  14. #1619
    membro sÍnior giselehaslice's Avatar
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    Pianoman, you're right. I think many people on here agree with you on your assesment, including me. I have learned though, it really is a lost cause trying to get Fabrizio to agree with anyone. He is an extremely close minded person, its his way or the highway. He will ignore your comments if you are right about something, will not have anything smart enough to say back, will just ignore it and act like it never happened.
    Last edited by giselehaslice; October 2nd, 2008 at 04:02 PM.

  15. #1620

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    I agree with some of what you say Pianoman, but not with this statement, "You have to admit there's something wrong with the idea that a small city of 40,000 can have a healthy economy when it bets all its chips on a single source of jobs - casinos." The whole Jersey Shore is mostly based on one source of jobs-tourism. The economies of A.C., Ocean City, Wildwood, etc... have always relied on tourism for jobs. As far as the crime/blank wall argument it's pretty much common sense that where you have more eyes and ears and an active street level scene with shops, restaurants, cafes, people, etc... there is safety in numbers and less crime. Versus long, desolate poorly lit empty spaces. Where would you feel more safe, on the Boardwalk at the Pier or one of the desolate blocks off the Boardwalk? Yes ignorance, poor education, welfare conditioning, etc... help breed crime but so does poor urban planning.

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