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  1. #31

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    NY Post

    VICTORIA'S NEW PLACE

    Posted: 4:34 am
    October 8, 2008


    VICTORIA'S Secret has just inked a deal worth $100 million for a 24,000 foot duplex spread in SoHo at 591-593 Broadway.

    But the 15-year lease is for a space that doesn't yet exist. That's because Aurora Capital, which controls the retail in the building, is moving a "mountain," a lounge and a lobby to build a 60 foot swath of glass frontage to accommodate the sexy Angels.

    The deal was made possible by getting current tenant Eastern Mountain Sports, represented by Bruce Katz of Katz & Associates, to move to 18,000 feet in Thor Equities' 530 Broadway.

    Additionally, area staple, the Lounge, will simply be shuttered. And the building entrance between the two storefronts is being shuffled off Broadway to Mercer St. where the new lobby will have a larger, high-speed elevator.

    Aurora Capital, which is controlled by Bobby Cayre, Alex Adjmi and Jared Epstein, also owns 600 Broadway, where Hollister's flagship has taken the retail and 568 Broadway, which has Armani A/X, Forever 21 and others.

    Richard Hodos of CB Richard Ellis represented the Limited's Victoria's Secret in the deal for a 12,000 foot ground and ditto in the basement.
    Ground floor spaces on that block run from $400 to $600 a foot. No one returned calls for comment but for the Limited which had none anyway.
    *

    Lehman Brothers new owner, Barclay's, has just gobbled up 60,000 feet in Queens on the 10th to 12th floors of the One MetLife Plaza tower. The deal is a sublease from MetLife in the building owned by Brause Realty.

    Josh Kurlioff and Paul Glickman of Cushman & Wakefield along with the Jones Lang LaSalle team of Lloyd Desatnick and Peter Riguardi represented MetLife which got between $38 for the first few years and $42 for the rest of the term. A CB Richard Ellis team represents Bar clay's and no one would comment on the deal.
    *
    Word on the street is that the Queen of the Sky scrapers, Darcy Stacom of CB Richard Ellis has advised bidders for the Helmsley Park Lane Hotel that the estate is not in a rush to sell.

    "They have pulled back and are monitoring the market because they know everyone will have a hard time chasing down partners and lenders in this environment," snitched one source.

    Meanwhile, the hotel - which was originally thought to sell for as much as $800 million but was most recently fetching bids in the $600 million range - is booking overnight stays through the end of next year. Some bidders were considering condos but are wary of the low ceilings while others want to maintain it as a hotel.
    *

    A Cushman & Wakefield report has found commercial velocity slowing, vacancy rates increasing and rents falling - and the expectation is for even further deterioration in the market.

    Joseph Harbert of C&W said vacancy rates could go from the current overall 7.4 percent to the 9 and 10 percent range by the beginning of the next quarter.



    Copyright 2008 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. #32
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYC4Life View Post

    VICTORIA'S NEW PLACE


    VICTORIA'S Secret has just inked a deal worth $100 million for a 24,000 foot duplex spread in SoHo at 591-593 Broadway.

    ... The deal was made possible by getting current tenant Eastern Mountain Sports ... to move to 18,000 feet in Thor Equities' 530 Broadway.

    Additionally, area staple, the Lounge, will simply be shuttered ...
    That new Victoria's site is just south of Houston on the west side of Broadway; VS has been one block south at the SW corner of Broadway and Prince for 10 (?) years (565 Broadway,opposite Dean & Deluca and Prada).

    Good to hear that Eastern Mountain will still be in the area; their new site at 530 Broadway will be just north of Spring on the east side of Broadway (it was formerly a Skecher's shoe store):

    According to Bob Mayerson, COO of Eastern Mountain Sports, the new location "will allow us to open a full-size flagship store in a prime location in Soho, with a significantly expanded product offering for our customers in Manhattan."
    The end of The Lounge will be no loss -- adios, trash dump

  3. #33

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    Soho

    The Strangers Next Door

    G. Paul Burnett/The New York Times
    For a once-elegant building on Macdougal Street, peeling paint and unwelcome visitors.

    By CAROLINE H. DWORIN
    Published: October 17, 2008

    AS dusk sets in on Macdougal Street, the rats who inhabit No. 43 lope out into the shadows, two, three, four at a time. They make their home on this otherwise elegant block in a vacant four-story building at King Street, directly across the street from the Cooke Center Academy, a private high school whose students hang out on the closed-off street.

    Neighbors call the structure many things: a blight, a menace, a mystery.

    The building, an 1846 red brick row house, is boarded up and covered in graffiti, its once-grand cornice in poor condition, the paint on the doors of its cracked Greek Revival entryway peeling off in crimson flakes the size of thumbnails. A weathered violation notice from the city’s Department of Buildings, dated Aug. 1, flaps on the door.

    “It’s been unoccupied for around 20 years,” said Andrew Berman, the executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation. “Although it’s really only in the last year or two it’s become both a health hazard and a safety hazard.”

    Although residents have complained for months about rats scurrying about the building, the most recent indication of the building’s problems occurred on Sept. 16, when the property failed an inspection by the city department of health for signs of rodent activity.

    “We baited the exterior of the building’s property within the week,” said Rick Simeone, the director of pest control services at the health department. But neighbors are skeptical about whether that action will solve the problem.

    According to local residents, the rodents are nothing new, nor are problems with the building’s structural integrity. A hatch in the roof that had been left open for months allowed rain to flood the floors. Yellow X’s were spray-painted on the sides of the building by the Fire Department, indicating that the structure is hazardous, and that firefighters should enter with caution.

    According to officials of the Landmarks Preservation Commission and other city agencies, multiple letters to the owners’ post office box have gone unopened and telephone calls have gone unanswered.

    “With recalcitrant owners, it sometimes does take quite a long time to get work done,” said John Weiss, the deputy general counsel of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    According to the Buildings Department’s Web site, the building is owned by Abraham and Arthur Blasof, who neighbors believe are brothers.

    Despite eight attempts, neither could be reached by phone. No number was available for Abraham Blasof. Arthur Blasof’s number was answered by a man who identified himself as Walter and said he was a relative of Mr. Blasof’s. He said he believed the building on Macdougal continued to be occupied.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/19/ny...ml?ref=thecity

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  4. #34
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That ^ great little corner property at 43 MacDougal is
    within the Charlton - King - Vandam Historic District:



    It sits opposite a part of the South Village which has been proposed
    for designation & protection by The Landmarks Preservation Commission.


  5. #35

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    Lets hope the owners will let someone help them, or at least let the authorities do something with the building.

  6. #36

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    Coincidently, Back in June, I took a pic of this building, not knowing how much of a significance it has.

    http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=153703


  7. #37

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    Thanks for the photo NYC4.

    Lots of nice pics on the link, thanks.

  8. #38

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    The Villager

    Updated On 10/24/08 at 03:25PM
    Developers lure residents with bicycles


    Bicycle from A Black Bike


    Peter Manning and Robert Siegel, the developers of 211 Elizabeth, a 15-unit building at 211 Elizabeth Street in Soho, are offering new residents free custom bicycles made by Dutch company A Black Bike. Prices for the bikes start at $950, according to the bike company's Web site. Units in the building, which has a bicycle storage room, range from 750 to 2,189 square feet and begin at $1.55 million.

  9. #39
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That swell new building ^ at 211 Elizabeth / 16 Prince has it's very own thread (but could use a thread title change).

  10. #40
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    SoHo's Little Singer Gets Dressed Up Once Again

    CURBED
    November 17, 2008


    New steel and leaded glass awning at 561 Broadway.

    The Little Singer building at 561 Broadway, the fanciful 1903 masterpiece
    by architect Ernest Flagg, has recently been dressed up with some original
    detailing which had been removed over the years. An awning of metal and
    leaded glass once again runs along the Broadway facade above the
    newly-Mango'ed windows. In the years before the Singer went up here,
    this lot was the site of Henry Wood's Marble Hall, a 2,000 seat theater
    which was home to Christy's Minstrels and other "black-face" theatricals
    popular in the years before and after the Civil War when this part of town
    was New York's entertainment center.

    Now, Richard Levine of Bone / Levine Architects, who has offices on the
    upper floors of the Little Singer and is in charge of restoration work at the
    building, designed and executed the newly-installed awnings, copying the
    originals as much as possible. This project was done with nary a noise
    from nimbys, unlike a new glass canopy proposed for the Public Theater in
    neighboring NoHo. During that next downtown stroll take a look up at the
    Singer facade and consider some work well done. Meanwhile, enjoy a
    virtual tour of the Singer's spectacular penthouse, which went on the
    market in April and is available to anyone who can stitch together a mere
    $8 million.


    Brackets installed on the Broadway facade to hold up the new awning.


    The crew from Bone / Levine attaching the awning.


    The completed awning framed by Ernest Flagg's filigree.


    The original 1903 Singer building (l.) and the 2008 version (r.).


    How the Little Singer looked at the beginning of the 20th Century.


    Until 1877 this lot housed a huge theater, home to popular Minstrel Shows.


    561 Broadway (c.) when the upper floors were home to Henry Wood's Marble Hall theater.


    The original awnings (l.) and the facade without awnings, circa 2002 (Photo: Hubert J. Steed).


    The newly-replicated awnings in place on the Little Singer facade.


    Looking through the beveled glass.


    Studded surface will discourage snow from collecting.


    The original faced and the edge of the new awning.


    The 88 Prince Street facade, sans awnings.


    The Little Singer out-shining its neighbors on Broadway.

    · Storecasting: Mango To Sweeten Up Broadway [Racked]
    · Projects Preservation Singer Building [Bone / Levine Architects website]
    · Public Theater's Monumental Changes Revealed [Curbed]
    · SOHO Penthouse [John Fulop Associates]

    561 broadway

  11. #41

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    SOHO, home of the $53,000 amp.
















    $7,950,000 penthouse/ 150 amp service

  12. #42

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    Could there be any doubt as to their shared heritage?
    So lovely to look at.



    This building deserves nothing less. This is one of those rare moments when it was done right.
    Last edited by 195Broadway; November 18th, 2008 at 08:51 PM.

  13. #43

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    Downtown's Ohio Theatre Likely to Close

    Posted at 1:00 PM, December 9, 2008


    Photo via konoa.com

    Before 66 Wooster Street became the Ohio Theatre and various apartments, it had a former life as a textile factory. Theatrical legend has it that before the first performance--in what was then called the Open Space--the cast and crew went down on hands and knees, armed with magnets, pulling decades of dropped pins and needles from the floorboard.

    Many years later, the Ohio is on pins and needles again. The building that houses the Ohio is being sold, and in a few weeks or months the Ohio Theatre will almost certainly cease to exist.

    Robert Lyons, artistic director of Soho Think Tank, a nonprofit group that administers the Ohio and produces the OBIE-award winning Ice Factory Festival, describes the situation: "In one way or another, our days are numbered. It's just a matter of what that number is. We're trying to finish the season lined up through June. We could possibly still be here in the summer for Ice Factory '09. It could all end as soon as the end of January." While Lyons is currently in talks with the building's prospective buyer, he dismisses the idea that the Ohio will have any long-term future.

    "That doesn't seem like it's in the cards," he says. If the new owner allows the current season to finish up, audiences can bid farewell to the Ohio through its remaining scheduled shows, among them Target Margin's 10 Blocks on the Camino Real, Eisa Davis's Angela's Mix Tape (produced by New Georges), and Clubbed Thumb's annual Summer Works festival.

    The building's current owners--William Hahn and Charles Magistro, who declined to comment for this article--made the decision to sell with some reluctance, according to Lyons. Apparently, maintenance expenses and preservation of the façade required by the city created an untenable financial burden. "They couldn't sustain this long-term support of the space," says Lyons. He does, however, credit Hahn and Magistro with their support of the theater over the past 20 years, in which they always kept the space's rent well below market value.

    In those 20 years, as a rental space and a producing theater, the Ohio has hosted local companies and visiting artists such as Rude Mechs, Pig Iron, Salt, ERS, the Foundry, Les Freres Corbusier, Riot Group, and Undermain. The Ohio has been remarkable not only for its talent roster, but also for its physical beauty. David Herskovits, the artistic director of Target Margin, regrets the loss of "the size of it, the height of the ceiling, the expanse of it, amazing and unusual for a small alternative space....

    It's big and grand, but has its own kind of funkiness." Maria Striar, the cofounder of Clubbed Thumb, remarks, "It's devastating. It's been a home for a whole generation of Downtown theater.... It's right in the heart of Downtown where slowly almost everything that belonged to the arts is being chiseled away."

    Lyons, who says he currently wavers between feelings of "great despondency" and feelings of gratitude for the two decades he's run the space, also links the Ohio's shuttering to a more general trend. "It's not the first cultural institution to succumb to real-estate pressures," he says.

    "Soon we're going to have a city without any cool theater spaces.... [New York needs] to protect our cultural jewels like this." While institutions such as the Performing Garage, the Drawing Center, and Here Arts Center remain, the Ohio's closing--and its likely conversion into a retail space--further completes Soho's transformation from artists' haven to shopper's paradise.--Alexis Soloski

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/...towns_ohio.php

    Copyright © 2008 Village Voice LLC

  14. #44

    Default In SoHo

    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    Downtown's Ohio Theatre Likely to Close

    Posted at 1:00 PM, December 9, 2008


    Photo via konoa.com

    Before 66 Wooster Street became the Ohio Theatre and various apartments, it had a former life as a textile factory. Theatrical legend has it that before the first performance--in what was then called the Open Space--the cast and crew went down on hands and knees, armed with magnets, pulling decades of dropped pins and needles from the floorboard.

    Many years later, the Ohio is on pins and needles again. The building that houses the Ohio is being sold, and in a few weeks or months the Ohio Theatre will almost certainly cease to exist.

    Robert Lyons, artistic director of Soho Think Tank, a nonprofit group that administers the Ohio and produces the OBIE-award winning Ice Factory Festival, describes the situation: "In one way or another, our days are numbered. It's just a matter of what that number is. We're trying to finish the season lined up through June. We could possibly still be here in the summer for Ice Factory '09. It could all end as soon as the end of January." While Lyons is currently in talks with the building's prospective buyer, he dismisses the idea that the Ohio will have any long-term future.

    "That doesn't seem like it's in the cards," he says. If the new owner allows the current season to finish up, audiences can bid farewell to the Ohio through its remaining scheduled shows, among them Target Margin's 10 Blocks on the Camino Real, Eisa Davis's Angela's Mix Tape (produced by New Georges), and Clubbed Thumb's annual Summer Works festival.

    The building's current owners--William Hahn and Charles Magistro, who declined to comment for this article--made the decision to sell with some reluctance, according to Lyons. Apparently, maintenance expenses and preservation of the façade required by the city created an untenable financial burden. "They couldn't sustain this long-term support of the space," says Lyons. He does, however, credit Hahn and Magistro with their support of the theater over the past 20 years, in which they always kept the space's rent well below market value.

    In those 20 years, as a rental space and a producing theater, the Ohio has hosted local companies and visiting artists such as Rude Mechs, Pig Iron, Salt, ERS, the Foundry, Les Freres Corbusier, Riot Group, and Undermain. The Ohio has been remarkable not only for its talent roster, but also for its physical beauty. David Herskovits, the artistic director of Target Margin, regrets the loss of "the size of it, the height of the ceiling, the expanse of it, amazing and unusual for a small alternative space....

    It's big and grand, but has its own kind of funkiness." Maria Striar, the cofounder of Clubbed Thumb, remarks, "It's devastating. It's been a home for a whole generation of Downtown theater.... It's right in the heart of Downtown where slowly almost everything that belonged to the arts is being chiseled away."

    Lyons, who says he currently wavers between feelings of "great despondency" and feelings of gratitude for the two decades he's run the space, also links the Ohio's shuttering to a more general trend. "It's not the first cultural institution to succumb to real-estate pressures," he says.

    "Soon we're going to have a city without any cool theater spaces.... [New York needs] to protect our cultural jewels like this." While institutions such as the Performing Garage, the Drawing Center, and Here Arts Center remain, the Ohio's closing--and its likely conversion into a retail space--further completes Soho's transformation from artists' haven to shopper's paradise.--Alexis Soloski

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/...towns_ohio.php

    Copyright © 2008 Village Voice LLC
    I will see SoHo next summer. Does anyone what does SoHo means? I don't understand what does SoHo means.

  15. #45
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    SoHo means "South of Houston" and refers to the blocks that lie on the south side of Houston Street, one of Manhattan's main east <> west thoroughfares. Houston Street (pronounced HOW'-stun) runs from the East River to the Hudson River and is divided at Broadway into East Houston Street and West Houston Street, with numbers running larger the farther Houston Street moves away from Broadway. Houston Street borders these neighborhoods to the north: Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo (North of Houston), Greenwich Village and the West Village. To the south: The Lower East Side, Little Italy [NoLIta], SoHo, [Hudson Square] [South Village]. Houston Street is named for William Houstoun, the spelling later bowdlerized into Houston.

    SoHo for a time was known as Hells Hundred Acres, so dubbed by the FDNY due to the large number of troublesome fires in the big old loft / warehouses now recognized around the world as the Cast Iron buildings which make up SoHo, once the hotbed of Art in America ...
    Artistic failure in America

    As promised, here’s another story of what happens when an artist is exiled by the community or neighborhood he helps (re-)build into a vibrant and hip art district. This time the artist, Dean Fleming, became “exiled” by choice.

    Scene: It was the heady 1960s; for the past decade-plus, America’s comfortable and prosperous middle class had been fleeing the country’s cities for the newly built suburbs, leaving huge openings in various city districts for all sorts of opportunistic elements to move in. Such a district in New York City, in 1962 sometimes called “Hells Hundred Acres,” was described by Richard Kostelanetz in his book on SoHo thusly:
    “The area below Houston Street [in New York City] was an industrial slum that I might have walked through reluctantly on the way from Greenwich Village to its north or Chinatown to its east. Industrial debris littered streets that were clogged with trucks and truckers during the working daytimes but deserted at night… I first became aware of someone actually residing in the nineteenth-century industrial slum in 1965 when I was introduced on Canal Street to a Korean artist [Nam June Paik] who had just arrived in America and rented a nearby ‘loft,’ which was a word new to me at the time… I later learned of such urban pioneers as Alison Knowles, who, in the late 1950s, had rented space in an industrial building on Broadway just north of Canal Street, where she lived with her husband-to-be, Dick Higgins… By the time I relocated downtown, first to the East Village in 1966, I became aware of artists who had rented large open space in which they worked and, incidentally, lived… [the author mentions Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, the writer Donald Barthelme, Chuck Close, and many others in the text that follows].”
    Dean Fleming, a California native, came of age as an artist in New York in the 1960s. A contemporary and friend of sculptor Mark di Suvero, Fleming worked initially in a catchy, trendy (but not earth-shatteringly original) minimalist-geometric style, and he had a few years of success in the gallery scene of the time. Fleming also was, along with di Suvero, a co-founder, in 1963, of the Park Place Gallery in SoHo, which is often called the first cooperative gallery in the district. Kostelanetz doesn’t seem to make mention of the space, but Wikipedia explains, “the gallery showcased works by younger, less established artists with an emphasis on Geometric abstraction, shaped canvas, Hard-edge painting, Op Art, paradoxical geometric objects, and experimental art. Many of the sculptors, painters and other artists who exhibited in Park Place Gallery were interested in cutting edge architecture, electronic music, and minimal art.”

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