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Thread: In SoHo

  1. #46

    Default In SoHo

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    SoHo means "South of Houston" and refers to the blocks that lie on the south side of Houston Street, one of Manhattan's main east <> west thoroughfares. Houston Street (pronounced HOW'-stun) runs from the East River to the Hudson River and is divided at Broadway into East Houston Street and West Houston Street, with numbers running larger the farther Houston Street moves away from Broadway. Houston Street borders these neighborhoods to the north: Alphabet City, the East Village, NoHo (North of Houston), Greenwich Village and the West Village. To the south: The Lower East Side, Little Italy [NoLIta], SoHo, [Hudson Square] [South Village]. Houston Street is named for William Houstoun, the spelling later bowdlerized into Houston.

    SoHo for a time was known as Hells Hundred Acres, so dubbed by the FDNY due to the large number of troublesome fires in the big old loft / warehouses now recognized around the world as the Cast Iron buildings which make up SoHo, once the hotbed of Art in America ...
    Artistic failure in America

    As promised, here’s another story of what happens when an artist is exiled by the community or neighborhood he helps (re-)build into a vibrant and hip art district. This time the artist, Dean Fleming, became “exiled” by choice.

    Scene: It was the heady 1960s; for the past decade-plus, America’s comfortable and prosperous middle class had been fleeing the country’s cities for the newly built suburbs, leaving huge openings in various city districts for all sorts of opportunistic elements to move in. Such a district in New York City, in 1962 sometimes called “Hells Hundred Acres,” was described by Richard Kostelanetz in his book on SoHo thusly:
    “The area below Houston Street [in New York City] was an industrial slum that I might have walked through reluctantly on the way from Greenwich Village to its north or Chinatown to its east. Industrial debris littered streets that were clogged with trucks and truckers during the working daytimes but deserted at night… I first became aware of someone actually residing in the nineteenth-century industrial slum in 1965 when I was introduced on Canal Street to a Korean artist [Nam June Paik] who had just arrived in America and rented a nearby ‘loft,’ which was a word new to me at the time… I later learned of such urban pioneers as Alison Knowles, who, in the late 1950s, had rented space in an industrial building on Broadway just north of Canal Street, where she lived with her husband-to-be, Dick Higgins… By the time I relocated downtown, first to the East Village in 1966, I became aware of artists who had rented large open space in which they worked and, incidentally, lived… [the author mentions Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, the writer Donald Barthelme, Chuck Close, and many others in the text that follows].”
    Dean Fleming, a California native, came of age as an artist in New York in the 1960s. A contemporary and friend of sculptor Mark di Suvero, Fleming worked initially in a catchy, trendy (but not earth-shatteringly original) minimalist-geometric style, and he had a few years of success in the gallery scene of the time. Fleming also was, along with di Suvero, a co-founder, in 1963, of the Park Place Gallery in SoHo, which is often called the first cooperative gallery in the district. Kostelanetz doesn’t seem to make mention of the space, but Wikipedia explains, “the gallery showcased works by younger, less established artists with an emphasis on Geometric abstraction, shaped canvas, Hard-edge painting, Op Art, paradoxical geometric objects, and experimental art. Many of the sculptors, painters and other artists who exhibited in Park Place Gallery were interested in cutting edge architecture, electronic music, and minimal art.”
    Thank you lofter1 for explaining the SoHo means South Of Houston. A street in New York City is called Houston.

  2. #47
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Hopefully you read the posting and understand that the name of Houston Street has nothing to do with Texas -- where they pronounce the word in a very stange way and unlike the pronounciation here in NYC.

  3. #48
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default 150 Sullivan Street

    Yeah, I know it's NYC and "location, location, location" and all that, but $315,000 for this ...you've got to be joking...but what am I saying? It can be the same here in Oz too when the market has its way.


    Friday, April 3, 2009

    So, what does $315,000 buy you in Soho these days? This charming little spot at 150 Sullivan Street, for one! Says the reader who tipped us off to this gem: "I think the couch is in the kitchen. Next to the stove." And says the brokerbabble, in a case of minor understatement: "Needs a little 'TLC', then you'll have a great place to live."




    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/04/0...fa_in_soho.php

    NY Times listing

  4. #49
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Richard Haas Mural 110 Prince Street

    This Prince St. mural by Richard Haas depicting Soho cast-iron architecture could be covered up by a developer who hopes to construct a building on the current one-story store site at 110 Prince St.

    Trompe l’oeil muralist warily eyes new Soho project

    By Patrick Hedlund

    A famous Soho mural vandalized by graffiti last summer might be facing another threat — this time from a developer looking to construct a building next door that would effectively mute the 1975 artwork.

    The landmark trompe l’oeil mural, painted by artist Richard Haas on what was the blank east wall of 112 Prince St. near the corner of Greene St., depicts the building’s cast-iron facade and has become a celebrated piece of public art in the neighborhood.

    Last September graffiti taggers let loose on the mural, covering the bottom portion of the five-story-tall piece with spray paint and prompting a response from Haas on the need to take action.

    The point could be moot, however, if the developer decides to build a new structure on the site of the neighboring one-story property. Camper Shoes, which has a store at the corner of Prince and Wooster Sts., wants to demolish the existing single-story building at 110 Prince St. to construct a new headquarters, which, under zoning law, could rise as high as the adjacent six-story cast-iron building bearing Haas’s mural.
    Any building more than one story tall would at least partially block the artwork, if not cover it completely.

    “What’s going to happen to the mural?” asked Soho Alliance Director Sean Sweeney, noting that his organization would not be opposed to the scale of the new building, only its effects on the mural. “Should we go extremely NIMBY?” he contemplated.

    Camper Shoes’ attorney planned to meet with the Alliance last week.
    One possible solution would be for Haas to paint a new piece on an available nearby wall; but the artist explained that the climate has changed more than three decades since the original work went up — leading to hundreds more by Haas worldwide.

    “The irony, of course, is this was the premier piece that led to tens of thousands of pieces all over the world,” said Haas. The artist noted he encountered a similar situation at the Fontainbleau Hotel in Miami, where another of his trompe l’oeil murals was lost with the hotel’s demolition, despite staunch community opposition. “It is something that in most cultures would be preserved, period,” he stated.

    Haas added he is open to the possibility of painting another mural in a different location, but that available space and the city’s use of uncovered walls for advertisements might present a challenge.

    “Absolutely,” he replied when asked about doing another Downtown piece. However, he pointed out, “There are very few walls of that type that are still around that are highly visible.”

    The building at 112 Prince St. is afforded protections by being in Soho’s Cast-Iron Historic District, and the mural “would be treated as a significant feature of that building,” said Lisi de Bourbon, a spokesperson for the Landmarks Preservation Commission. “The commission would consider it in its deliberations over the appropriateness of any proposed structure for that site” at 110 Prince St., she said.

    The Alliance believes the developer would have no trouble getting permission to demolish the one-story “taxpayer” structure — an action which nevertheless requires approval by the L.P.C. because of its location in the historic district. However, de Bourbon added, “It’s not necessarily a done deal. The commission can be quite exacting about what qualifies as appropriate for a historic district.”

    Regardless, Haas believes it will take a mighty effort to protect his mural from the forces of real estate.

    “The city would have to get involved proactively in seeing the value of that piece,” Haas said. “I’ve never seen a developer yet who didn’t go the full distance.”

    http://www.thevillager.com/villager_...ompeloeil.html



    http://www.richardhaas.com/zmuralfr.html


  5. #50
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Soho's Richard Haas Faux Facade Be Saved?

    December 11, 2009, by Sara


    [Photo courtesy epicharmus/Flickr]

    The situation is looking less dire but more confusing down at 112 Prince Street, where Camper Shoes announced plans earlier this year to build an up-to-five-story commercial headquarters that would effectively block out artist Richard Haas' trump l'oeil mural at the corner of Prince and Greene Streets. The Villager reports that the developer no longer plans to obscure the whole mural, but will build a two- or three-story structure instead. Victory for the Haas-heads? Not exactly. Haas himself thinks a three-story building would ruin the mural: "'If you're going to have two stories' above the original first floor...'I think you've compromised it too much.'"

    Because the building falls within the Soho Cast-Iron Historic District, the Landmarks Preservation Commission also gets to offer its opinion. But no one seems quite sure what LPC is issuing an opinion on, because it's unclear when construction could start or what the developer can actually afford to build. Adding to the mess (sorta), the owner of 112 Prince put in a request in October for the city to wash the graffiti tags off the mural, but the cleaning would also erase part of the mural itself. The mayor's office has the building on the list to be scrubbed, but while everyone is busy trying to untangle the situation, the city plans to wait for the landlord's confirmation before moving ahead with the clean up.

    Soho Mural Movement [Villager]
    Soho's Faux Facade Threatened By New Building 'Obliteration' [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/1...saved.php#more

  6. #51

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    Trompe-loeil buildings on lot-line walls should always be regarded as temporary.

    Build the five-story building.

  7. #52
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I can't see any way, from a legal point of view, how the existence of a trompe-loeil painting on the side of one building (no matter how terrific and memorable it is) could be used to minimize the rights of the property owner next door from developing that lot to the legally allowable height. Seems that for LPC / CPC to dis-allow development of that lot in line with existing zoning in order to save the view of the painting would qualify as an unlawful "Taking" by a government agency.

    Better that those agencies focus on saving real buildings of worth, rather than faux representations.

  8. #53

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    The city would have to purchase the air rights to compensate the owner.

    Not going to happen.

  9. #54

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    It'd be nice if they construct something as beautiful as the painting.

  10. #55
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    Right, that should be the requirement.

  11. #56
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Haughwout Building - 490 Broadway

    Wonderful .

    Soho
    Gem Unwraps Itself for the Holidays


    December 29, 2009, by Pete

























    Sometimes a facelift is the perfect antidote to the seasonal blues. The old Haughwout Building at 490 Broadway in Soho stripped off its construction netting last week to show off a full makeover, revealing a switch from the former drab brown to a fresh blue-gray. It's part of a renovation by increasingly ubiquitous firm ODA (which has offices at 494 Broadway) to create a new Bebe emporium in a space that Staples once called home. The cast-iron palazzo, built from a design by architect John P. Garvey with a nod to Jacapo Sansovino's 1537 Biblioteca Marciana in Venice, is also getting some major work done inside, including structural refitting that will open up the first floor to new retail space above. Expanding the retail beyond the ground level returns this one to its roots.

    The E. V. Haughwout Company opened in 1857, offering some competition to Tiffany a block to the north. The floors above Broadway were filled with silver, cut glass, china, chandeliers and other assorted riches. The Cosmopolitan Art journal declared that it was, "... one of the most imposing and beautiful buildings in the city, this monster manufacturing and sales establishment embraces more in value and interest than any single building in the world." A few years later Mary Lincoln found it the perfect place to buy some fancy china for the White House. Once the "aspirational women's fashion brand" opens up here maybe another First Lady will drop in for a little shopping.

    Storecasting: Staples Swapped Out For a Bebe [Racked]
    Office for Design & Architecture [oda-architecture.com]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/2...e_holidays.php

  12. #57
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    This is a big improvement (aside from the fact that now there isn't a stationary store for blocks in any direction).

    I never liked the tan paint job.

    When I first moved down here the Haughwout Building had been left untended for decades and had achieved a nasty but beautiful patina of soot and dirt and grit that rendered it a crusty black. It was as if the entire facade of cast iron had been put through a blow torch, but it still survived and served it's purpose as a working loft building. And it was full of mystery.

    The grey is better than the drab brown, but I wish they'd opted for a darker hue.

    Garvey's inspiration for the EV Haughwout Building: Jacopo Sansovino's Biblioteca Marciana

    The windows on the original are a tad better.

    More at Flickr



    http://olhares.aeiou.pt/a_biblioteca...to1978714.html

  13. #58
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    A Quiet Pocket of SoHo

    By CHRISTIAN L. WRIGHT


    Crosby Street doesn’t usually have a very populated look.



    Savoy, at the corner of Prince, has its bustling side.


    The Crosby Hotel, center, which the London-based Firmdale opened in September, draws newcomers.

    AT 11:30 on a Friday morning in December, SoHo was teeming.

    On Broadway, Topshop overflowed with the aggressively chic; getting to the shoe racks at Bloomingdale’s required at least one strategic hip-check; at Uniqlo, there were more people poring over the skinny jeans and affordable cashmere than there are gulls above a successful trawler. And never mind the sidewalk; it was an impossible-to-navigate sea.

    Meanwhile, just one block east, all was quiet on Crosby Street. Along the narrow cobblestone path, the solitude was pierced only by the UPS man waving to the doorman as he passed by 30 Crosby and a slim fellow in a well-cut car coat walking his Rhodesian Ridgeback. By afternoon, when the fireplaces were lighted at Savoy, the restaurant on the corner of Prince Street and Crosby, the pedestrian traffic hurrying to the east and to the west was heavy, but only a girl in a knit cap carrying a big bolt of fabric turned south onto Crosby, into the eastern territory of the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District.

    “Crosby Street is just off the beaten track,” said Craig Markham, the director of marketing and public relations for Firmdale Hotels, the London-based company that opened the Crosby Street Hotel in September. “It’s a little bit quirky.”

    Indeed, when the Firmdale sales team started introducing the new hotel to long-established, top-level travel agents in New York City, some said, “Now, where exactly is Crosby Street?”

    The new hotel seems to be the crowning touch of the five-block stretch of Crosby that runs south of Houston Street to Howard Street, where the tourists don’t really seem to go, where residential real estate prices hover around $5 million per condo, where unusual shops manage to thrive and where the atmosphere is very much old SoHo: sleepy, arty, industrial, mysterious.

    The nonprofit Housing Works Bookstore Cafe anchors the northern end; the coveted designer Derek Lam just opened a gleaming glass-front shop at the southern end; and along the way are the unspoiled details of a bygone era.

    There are red brick buildings marked with the backward Z’s of old fire escapes, cast-iron facades of 19th-century factories that don’t rise over 10 stories, great big warehouse windows and slate-tiled roofs that borrow from European design. There are antiques and objets to be found (like an initialed Saxon armorial beaker, c. 1720, or a perfectly plausible daddy longlegs made of blown glass at De Vera), and funny little storefronts — Saturdays Surf NYC, Michele Varian housewares, Ń 33 Crosby tapas bar — that could easily be mistaken for private residences.

    Stepping onto Crosby Street is a bit like entering a botanical garden in the middle of an urban throng. Minus the flowers, of course. Against some odds, Crosby Street has managed its revitalization without losing its character.

    When Lucy Wallace Eustice, a founder and an owner of the handbag company M Z Wallace, opened her first shop in 2000, she chose Crosby “because of its character — the forgotten street of SoHo.” Megabrands like Chanel and Apple have opted for coordinates closer to the heart of SoHo, while the one-off stores along Crosby hark back to the days when artists lived and worked in the loft spaces and Dean & Deluca was just a small grocery known as Giorgio’s.

    Not so long ago, Crosby was little more than a supply street to the big buildings on Broadway (shoppers don’t seem to notice that there’s an alternate entrance to Bloomingdale’s on Crosby that’s much more low-key than the main doors on Broadway), and in fact, the street’s backdoor status may have served to protect it.

    Three years ago, when Nathan Kornfeld bought his 4,000-square-foot full-floor loft at No. 30, between Broome and Grand Streets, he didn’t know the street well enough to realize how lucky he was.

    “The Upper East Side is really dense and not as casual,” said Mr. Kornfeld, a partner at the private equity firm Patron Capital. “We looked in TriBeCa, but this was the best value. There are not a lot of lofts of this vintage and this size. It’s kind of unique.”

    Apartment 3A at 30 Crosby Street, a 4,100-square-foot open loft with pine floors, single slab marble countertops and a fireplace, is currently for sale for $4.9 million.

    Residential real estate at the high end has suffered during the recent economic downturn and, according to industry analyses, no neighborhood has been immune. Corcoran reports that in the third quarter of 2009, the median price of an apartment in Manhattan was $799,000, an 18 percent drop from the year before.

    These days, properties on Crosby Street are selling well above market average. For instance, a 2,678-square-foot second-floor apartment in the six-unit Bayard House at 76 Crosby went quickly into contract this month for $4.35 million, or $1,624 per square foot (the third-quarter median was $1,012).

    And a four-bedroom duplex at 55 Crosby is on the market for $5.8 million. It offers 25-foot ceilings and the fact that the architect Frank Gehry once owned it. On the other hand, the 6,000-square-foot penthouse reconfigured into a flaming, soaring rock ’n’ roll vision by the singer Lenny Kravitz and his designer, Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz, at 30 Crosby has languished on the market at $14.9 million.

    While the rest of SoHo has changed drastically, even in recent years, Crosby Street has resisted commercial transformation. Peter Hoffman, who opened the restaurant Savoy in 1990 — arriving in the neighborhood long before Balthazar and with a then-idiosyncratic farm-to-fork notion — remembers a different time and place. “The block between Prince and Houston in the early ’90s — there was a lot of crack getting smoked there,” he said.

    For many years, his light on the corner of the dark street was a beacon. Now, of course, there’s the MoMA Design Store opposite. And just a block down, a black GMC Yukon idles outside the set-back entrance to the Crosby Street Hotel, where rates start at $495 a night. Construction on the 270-room Mondrian Hotel (scheduled to open early this year) — which will rise above downtown Manhattan from 150 Lafayette Street, the thoroughfare that runs parallel, to the east — may be a harbinger of change.

    But for now, Crosby remains a little residential secret, sandwiched between commercial boulevards. “It’s very quiet,” Mr. Kornfeld said. “Unless it gets rowdy at Ń.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/re.../03crosby.html

  14. #59
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Many more folks walking up and down Street Crosby this holiday season than in the past.

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    A Quiet Pocket of SoHo

    By CHRISTIAN L. WRIGHT

    ... even in recent years, Crosby Street has resisted commercial transformation. Peter Hoffman, who opened the restaurant Savoy in 1990 ... remembers a different time and place. “The block between Prince and Houston in the early ’90s — there was a lot of crack getting smoked there,” he said.

    For many years, his light on the corner of the dark street was a beacon. Now, of course, there’s the MoMA Design Store opposite.
    Mr. Wright got this wrong.

    Savoy is at Crosby & Prince. The MoMA store is at Crosby & Spring -- a block to the south, opposite Balthazar, not Savoy.

  15. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Yeah, I know it's NYC and "location, location, location" and all that, but $315,000 for this ...you've got to be joking...but what am I saying? It can be the same here in Oz too when the market has its way.

    So you enter the apartment and directly to your left is the stove? What flow.
    Note the typical NYC door with 5 locks on it.

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