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Thread: Manhattan Residential Development

  1. #2086

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    Where are you getting this info?
    Last I heard they were (and visibly are),fixing up that hotel?!
    from Wiki:
    On March 4, 2013 Vornado revealed they are abandoning plans to demolish the hotel and replace it with the office tower. The decision was followed by a statement by chairman Steve Roth: "We're not going to tear down the hotel. In fact, we're going to invest in it aggressively and try to make it into a really profitable, really good hotel for our purposes."[25]

  2. #2087

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    Quote Originally Posted by scumonkey View Post
    Where are you getting this info?
    Last I heard they were (and visibly are),fixing up that hotel?!
    from Wiki:
    On March 4, 2013 Vornado revealed they are abandoning plans to demolish the hotel and replace it with the office tower. The decision was followed by a statement by chairman Steve Roth: "We're not going to tear down the hotel. In fact, we're going to invest in it aggressively and try to make it into a really profitable, really good hotel for our purposes."[25]
    They're currently trying to sign anchor office tenants. There are no plans to keep the hotel.

    http://nypost.com/2014/08/05/famed-h...ng-ball-again/

    Also, that quote you posted is totally out of context. There were never "abandoned plans" to redevelop the site. It's that Vornado wasn't finding a tenant back when the economy was bad, so decided to put the redevelopment on the back burner. Obviously the site will operate as a hotel until it's emptied and demolished, whether next week or 10 years from now.

  3. #2088

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    I don't believe I posted out of context...
    here it is in it's entirety:
    In May 2010 the hotel was again in danger of demolition.[13] Manhattan Borough president Scott Stringer gave a conditional approval[14][15] overruling Manhattan Community Board 5.[16]
    The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission reviewed the hotel's Cafe Rouge for landmark status[17] based on a request by the Hotel Pennsylvania Preservation Society,[18] but on October 22, 2010 the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission declined to designate the cafe as a landmark.[19]
    On July 14, 2010 the New York City Department of City Planning voted unanimously in favor of the construction of the tower.[20]
    On August 23, 2010 the NYC Council voted to approve the proposed Uniform Land Use Review Procedure submitted by the building owners.[21][22]
    On December 14, 2011 Vornado proposed to delay the demolition of the hotel due to market conditions.[23][24]
    On March 4, 2013 Vornado revealed they are abandoning plans to demolish the hotel and replace it with the office tower. The decision was followed by a statement by chairman Steve Roth: "We're not going to tear down the hotel. In fact, we're going to invest in it aggressively and try to make it into a really profitable, really good hotel for our purposes."[25]
    While Roth said the roughly $300 million hotel renovation has been put “on hold,” the firm will go down one of two paths — either landing an anchor tenant for a new tower or a renovation of the hotel that would still generate more income and improve the neighborhood.

    you said:
    "There are no plans to keep the hotel."

    but in the article you linked to it says:
    "While Roth said the roughly $300 million hotel renovation has been put “on hold,” the firm will go down one of two paths — either landing an anchor tenant for a new tower or a renovation of the hotel that would still generate more income and improve the neighborhood.

  4. #2089
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    There's Nothing to Fear From New York's Next Skyscraper Boom

    Except for people afraid of heights, no one has any reason to worry about the coming wave of new towers.

    by Kriston Capps


    When Nicolai Ouroussoff got a look at the building that Jean Nouvel designed for New York City back in 2007, he called it "the most exhilarating addition to the skyline in a generation." The architecture critic for The New York Times at the time, Ouroussoff name-checked the heavyweights in his review: Cass Gilbert, who designed the Woolworth Building; the Chrysler Building's William Van Alen; the god Mies van der Rohe. Even the 19th-century English art critic John Ruskin is summoned in praise of Nouvel.

    The skyscraper in question, 53 W. 53rd Street, adjacent to the Museum of Modern Art, isn't finished yet. Construction has only just begun. But history has already vindicated Ouroussoff's untethered praise.

    If New Yorkers once saw their skyline as the great citadel of capitalism, who could blame them? We had the best toys of all.

    But for the last few decades or so, that honor has shifted to places like Singapore, Beijing and Dubai, while Manhattan settled for the predictable.
    Perhaps that’s about to change.

    It's no longer a question. There's now a date set for the return of new New York architecture: 2018.


    New York City in 2018. (CityRealty)

    That's the year that Nouvel's MoMA Tower at 53 W. 53rd Street, a Hines development, is scheduled to be completed—along with quite a few other projects in Midtown. CityRealty just released the rendering above to promote 53W53 and showcase what Manhattan will look like in 2018, once the many projects currently under construction or in development around Central Park are completed.

    Not all of them are so beloved as Nouvel's tower. "One57 is Exhibit A in what we should be able to prevent," writes Michael Kimmelman, the present-day architecture critic for The New York Times, in a stern note last December. That project's architect, Christian de Portzamparc, like Nouvel, is a Pritzker Prize–winning designer. Rising 1,000 feet over Central Park at 157 West 57th Street today, One57 boasts penthouses that are reportedly selling for as much as $90 million—but it is not more admired for beating 53W53 to the punch. "It's anybody's guess how the building got past the drawing board," Kimmelman writes.


    From left: 53W53; One57; 432 Park Avenue, designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects (Macklowe/CIM Group); 56 Leonard, designed by Herzog & de Meuron (Hines/Alexico Group)

    The CityRealty rendering includes these two projects and at least two-dozen more, most of them supertall skyscrapers clustered around Midtown's much-maligned Billionaire's Row. These aren't the finest renderings of the individual projects made to date, not by a long shot, but they do convey the scale of the skyscraper boom taking shape in New York right now.

    While few of these projects have yet to arrive, they are already changing Manhattan in measurable ways. New York Daily News reporter Katherine Clarke runs down how Midtown residents are making way for the future now. Don't pity the millionaires being displaced by the billionaires too much: Some long-term residents are looking to sell their moderately priced (million-dollar) condos to "buyers who’ve been lured to the area by the dazzling new towers but can’t quite afford the price tags."


    (CityRealty)


    (CityRealty)

    Clarke's report sounds a lot like filtering at work. Economic success drives metropolitan movement, and in Midtown Manhattan, economic success at the global level is creating the conditions whereby many who are not billionaires stand to gain. Increasing the supply at the luxury level, even at the stratospheric level, can help workers and residents of many different classes to move on up. Filtering is one reason why no one should fear the skyscraper boom: Eventually, it can help create the conditions of a more affordable New York.

    Many critics don't see how building luxury pieds-à-terre for foreign billionaires helps anyone at all. The developer Ofer Yardeni is one of many who thinks that this unprecedented scale of luxury development indicates a residential bubble that is ready to pop. The Municipal Art Society has emerged as a locus of dissent regarding the cultural changes that a skyscraper boom augurs, especially regarding uses around Central Park.


    (CityRealty)


    (CityRealty)

    Billionaires Row has its problems. Namely, no one has figured out how to capture enough of the wealth that billionaires from Russia, China, Brazil, and other places are parking along the park.

    Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg was correct to greet with glee the prospect of billionaires buying up penthouses in Manhattan, but the scheme to redistribute foreign mega-wealth to local residents and infrastructure has hit a hitch. These non-U.S. owners may have to pay property taxes, but they still pay relatively less in total taxes than their American counterparts.

    New York City still needs to find a way to tax these penthouses back down to Earth. Maybe the city should assess property taxes that ascend along a vertical axis. But the wrong lesson to take away from the developments in Midtown would be to prevent skyscrapers from turning up in other places.


    (CityRealty)

    That's especially critical for the next wave of building. While construction in Midtown has been defined by the emerging super-skinny supertall-tower typology—with relatively little square footage and few units—there are many more towers on the horizon in New York. The second wave of the skyscraper boom includes more modestly scaled towers, most of them about 600 feet in height, in places like Williamsburg, Long Island City, and Hudson Yards.

    These buildings promise to increase residential housing at many scales, including rental housing, but they face long odds from incumbent homeowners and residents. Protests over the Domino Sugar factory development in Williamsburg have mostly subsided, but elsewhere—in Queens, Brooklyn, and in Harlem and on the Upper West Side—objections to planned developments still stand.


    From left: 555 10th Avenue, a 52-story rental building for Hudson Yards designed by SLCE Architects (Extell Development); 346 Livingston Street, a 52-story rental building in Downtown Brooklyn designed by Lattner Architects (Steiner NYC); 250 Ashland Place, a 51-story rental building designed by FXFOWLE Architects (Gotham Organization); 700 First Avenue, a proposed development for Midtown East designed by Richard Meier and Partners (Solow Management).

    Such developments don't challenge the skyline the way that new supertall skyscrapers do (or the way that critics fear that they do). The key to building a more affordable New York by 2018 will be supporting the construction that complements the supreme-luxury residential towers in Midtown: Residential and rental buildings with some affordable-housing set-asides, yes, but also more condos. Rezoning Hudson Yards to allow more residential construction would be a start. Eliminating the punitive state limit on residential density would be even better. But acknowledging that increasing the supply—even high in the sky—can boost fortunes for everyone is crucial to the debate.

    http://www.citylab.com/housing/2014/...r-boom/382663/

  5. #2090
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    I just learned something from that ^ article. I wasn't aware that the state had a cap (FAR 12) on residential density. I hope De Blasio gets the state to change it.

  6. #2091

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    I sure wouldn't have thought there's a density limit with all the residential high rises and skyscrapers in midtown alone, not to mention townhomes.

  7. #2092
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    Developer Hopes to Raze 807 Park, Build New 12-Story Condo

    by Zoe Rosenberg


    Renderings via New York YIMBY.

    The developer who has owned the beleaguered condo building at 807 Park Avenue since 2004, with nary a tenant, has decided the best way to fix the jinxed building's problem is to raze it. Last night, Aion presented the Landmarks Preservation Commission with a plan to demolish the existing heavily-altered 1899 building and construct a new, taller 12-story condo building at the site. Architect Charles Platt of PBDW Architects presented the plan for the new, glassy building to the LPC and community. According to YIMBY, the community unilaterally rallied against the "wanton destruction" of one of the oldest buildings in the historic district. Despite its current landmarked status, the building received a seven-floor vertical addition in the early 1980's. The original structure stood 5 stories tall.



    With Aion's earlier remakings of the building in mind, one neighbor even compared what the developer is now asking for to a child killing his parents, then saying, "Help me, I'm an orphan." That reaction might be a little over the top, especially considering the commissioners' largely positive reaction to the project.




    The LPC has suggested that the architect figure out a way to incorporate the original building's facade, pictured above, into the new construction. The architect will return in front of the LPC with a revised plan at a later date.

    Landmarks Unable To Back Proposal For 807 Park Avenue on Upper East Side [YIMBY]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1...tory_condo.php

  8. #2093
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    Woolworth Building is one of many expensive new condo projects set to debut around old city park

    BY Katherine Clarke


    The Beekman Residence City Hall Park is becoming the new hotbed for luxury development

    An old city park is becoming a new hotbed for development.

    As the real estate market in lower Manhattan heats up, hundreds of pricey new apartment projects are set to debut by 2016. The new developments will form a ring around City Hall Park, the often-overlooked green space running from Chambers to Barclay Sts.

    Real estate pros have their eyes on the middle of lower Manhattan. “This area is becoming so relevant,” said Tara King-Brown, a broker at the Corcoran Group and a resident of the area. “As the neighborhood turns from a massive construction site into a real place where people live, the park will establish itself as a residential anchor — and not just a place where office workers go to eat their lunch.”

    City parks have long been a major draw for real estate developers, who crave views of green space and plenty of light and air. For years, developers have trampled one another for opportunities to build around Central Park, Gramercy Park and, more recently, Madison Square Park.


    Susan Watts/New York Daily News
    Skip Blumberg, head of Friends of City Hall Park, has been touting the park for decades

    Now attention turns to City Hall Park, which has already had a small taste of new development in the form of Frank Gehry’s rippling steel tower at 8 Spruce St. and a glitzy new rental tower called the Lara at 113 Nassau St.

    But now, hundreds of new for-sale units, including 34 multimillion-dollar homes at the Woolworth Building and 68 at the stunning Beekman Residences at 5 Beekman St., are about to test the market for luxury homes in the heart of Manhattan’s civic center. Historically, this is where you’re more likely to run into an arraigned criminal, a politician, or both, than a billionaire oil mogul.

    “City Hall Park is the center of the new downtown,” said broker John Gomes of Douglas Elliman.

    Prices are also slated to go through the roof as the hot market for luxury homes in the Financial District and Tribeca spills over into the civic center, which is the last lego block to be developed south of Canal St. Developers are expecting condo buyers to pay up to $110 million for a trophy penthouse in a neighborhood where the median sale price for a newly built condo was just $4.5 million this year.

    On the flip side, some experts are skeptical whether City Hall Park really holds the same cachet — or can help drive sales of high-dollar apartment prices like its counterparts uptown.


    PropertyShark
    Sharif El-Gamal’s Soho Properties is planning a 665-foot glass tower

    “Are you kidding me?” said broker Ryan Serhant of Nest Seekers International. “There’s an insane amount of traffic there, to and from Brooklyn Bridge, and it’s just funky. There’s no way this is the next Madison Square Park.”


    The Beekman Residences
    Sales are underway at the Beekman Residences

    In recent years, the odds have certainly been stacked against the 9-acre park. But the history is rich and real. Dutch colonists grazed their livestock there. The green space even predates City Hall itself, the cornerstone for which wasn’t laid until 1803.

    The park fell into disrepair by the late 1990s, then was given a major $35 million facelift in 1999 under Mayor Rudy Giuliani. The city installed a perimeter fence, reinstalled a historic central fountain and introduced beautiful bronze gas candelabras to light the park at night.


    ABN Realty, LLC
    A new condo at 19 Park Place is one of many new residential projects coming to the streets surrounding City Hall Park

    But the victory lap was cut short when 9/11 shut down lower Manhattan. A large chunk of the park remained closed for years after the terrorist attacks, making it virtually inaccessible to residents of the neighborhood. During that time, Mayor Michael Bloomberg cited security concerns surrounding City Hall.

    But Skip Blumberg, head of advocacy group Friends of City Hall Park, says the park is on the rise. There’s been a reopening of the northern segment in 2007 and the subsequent rebuilding of the World Trade Center site just a few blocks south. Madison Square Park also had a renovation in 2000, right before it become a major destination for residential developers. That’s happening around City Hall Park now, too.

    For his part, Blumberg is campaigning for more permanent seating areas in the park and for the of a new lawn on the plaza adjacent to Tweed Courthouse, the other large municipal building inside the park.


    PropertyShark
    Developer DDG is bringing a new condo to 12-14 Warren Street

    “The World Trade Center was the first piece of the puzzle,” said Sharif El-Gamal, who is building a new condo tower at 45 Park Place, just west of the park. “It gave residential developers the confidence to start proceeding with their own contributions to the neighborhood.”

    Read on for a closer look at some of the new projects slated to debut around the park:

    Woolworth Building

    The top 30 floors of the landmark Woolwoth Building are being transformed into 34 luxury apartments, including a five-level penthouse fit for a Russian oligarch. Prices range from $3.88 million for a 1,290-square-foot one-bedroom to an Earth-shattering $110 million for the 9,403-square-foot seven-level penthouse.

    45 Park Place

    Sharif El-Gamal’s Soho Properties is planning a 665-foot glass tower with close to 50 apartments. The building, which has been designed by architecture firm SOMAand Michel Abboud, will be adjacent to an Islamic museum designed by Jean Nouvel. Prices haven’t been released.


    PropertyShark
    Developers Don Peebles and the Elad Group are transforming a landmarked building, formerly home to the Manhattan Criminal Court, into a luxury condo

    5 Beekman St.

    Sales are underway at the Beekman Residences. Units there are priced between $1.4 million for a one-bedroom apartment and $3.7 million for a three-bedroom pad. The building, which is being redeveloped with an adjacent glass tower, was first constructed in 1881 as one of the first high-rise buildings in New York. The site’s renowned for its extraordinary nine-story atrium.

    19 Park Place

    A new, futuristic-looking 21-story condo at Park Place between Broadway and Church Sts. will have a total of 24 apartments, nearly half of which will occupy full floors. Amenities will include a gym, several residential lounges and a shared terrace. Prices have not yet been released.

    12-14 Warren St.

    Developer DDG is planning a boutique 12-story condo with 13 units, all less than a block from the park.

    346 Broadway

    Developers Don Peebles and the Elad Group are transforming a landmarked building, formerly home to the Manhattan Criminal Court, into a luxury condo. The building will have more than 140 apartments. Pricing hasn’t been released.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...icle-1.2042451

  9. #2094
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    City approves residential conversion for Upper East Side parking garage

    The Board of Standards and Appeals gives thumbs up for loss of 365 spaces and gain of up to 60 luxury units at 152 East 87th Street

    By Tobias Salinger
    January 30, 2015


    This parking garage at 152 East 87th Street will now turn into a luxury residential building, after the city Board of Standards and Appeals approved the plan Friday.
    (Tobias Salinger)

    The owner of an Upper East Side parking garage has gained final city approval to turn the building into a luxury rental residence.

    The Board of Standards and Appeals voted unanimously Friday to authorize Allan Garage’s plan to convert the 152 E. 87th St. site into a glassy 19-story apartment complex with up to 60 units.

    The approval means the garage will reduce the number of public parking spaces from 515 to 150, and a Budget Rent A Car currently onsite will vacate.


    The design by Ismael Leyva will shrink the property's number of parking spaces to 150 from 515 and grow the number of residential units from 0 to up to 60.
    (Board of Standards and Appeals)

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.2098315

  10. #2095
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    Questionable Seventh Ave. Landmark Finally Razed For Condos

    March 6, 2015, by Zoe Rosenberg





    Demolition has started at the site of the landmarked-but-not-really-worth-it triangular building at 130 Seventh Avenue South, DNAinfo reports. The site will give rise to a new high-end condo building designed by BKSK that won over the Landmarks Preservation Commission on its third try in April 2014. The building will replace embattled nightclub Veranda that shuttered amidst legal woes in 2013. The new six-story building between West 9th and West 10th streets is being developed by Greystone with Continental Ventures and Itzhaki Acquisitions. It will have five floor-through condos measuring about 2,500-square-feet each, and ground-floor retail. Demolition of the existing structure will last until about April, and the new building is expected to be complete 18 months following.





    Former Landmark Building Demolished to Make Way for Condos [DNA]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/0...for_condos.php

  11. #2096
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    45 E 22nd...I could not find a thread.


    tectonic

  12. #2097

    Default REVEALED: 900-Foot Norman Foster-Designed Condo Tower Coming to Sutton Place


    First spotted by the eagle-eyes at SkyscraperPage, a New York Press article has given us our first look at a potential 900-foot skyscraper reportedly designed by Foster + Partners and developed by the Bauhouse Group. The New York City-based real estate development and investment firm had recently closed on the three-building $32 million rental portfolio in tony Sutton Place at 428-432 East 58th Street. In March, the firm acquired a fourth property at 426 East 58th Street.

    To read more.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  13. #2098
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    They'll be able to watch people in the RI tram watching people in One Sutton Place. That's meta.

  14. #2099

    Default City’s First Micro-Apartment Project ‘MY Micro NY’ Ready for Stacking


    Just in time for Earth Day, New York’s first micro-unit apartment building, dubbed My Micro NY, is entering its final construction phase. When finished later this year, urbanites will have a chance to live within the center of the city in a brand new building flush with amenities, all for under $3,000. Developed by Monadnock Development and the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the soon-to-be-nine-story structure wrapped up foundation work this past winter, and a one-story steel platform is ready to receive 55 modular units.
    To read more
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    The View for a Few

    Amenity gardens are the latest trophy spaces for luxury real estate developments in New York.

    by Alan G. Brake


    Courtesy Dirtworks

    150 Charles Street

    Designed by Dirtworks Landscape Architecture atop a new building by COOKFOX Architects, 150 Charles includes 30,000 square feet of landscaped and outdoor space, including rooftops, public and private terraces, and courtyards.

    “We thought of it as a vertical landscape that helps to give the building its identity,” said Dirtworks principal David Kamp. Plantings change from lush, wooded courtyards up to meadow-like roof landscapes.

    Architect: COOKFOX Architects
    Landscape architect: Dirtworks Landscape Architecture


    Courtesy Shigeo Kawasaki, Thomas Balsley Associates

    Gotham West


    This three level project, designed by Thomas Balsley Associates, includes an at grade garden with a reflecting pool and specimen tree, a mid level lounge area overlooking the garden below, and a rooftop lawn and lounge with a projection wall and bar. “I’ve been around the city for a while,” said Balsley. “There’s a newer, younger buyer for these condos, who have a very active and very social lifestyle.”

    Architect: SLCE Architects
    Landscape architect: Thomas Balsley Associates


    Courtesy Workshop/APD and Gunn Landscape architecture

    Printing House Mews


    Workshop/apd and Gunn Landscape Architecture are transforming this disused private alleyway on the south end of the West Village into an intimate courtyard for two townhouses and three maisonettes, as well as a viewing garden for the condominiums above. “The space is well crafted, and the paths, planters, and seating reinterpret the architecture of the townhouses,” said Workshop/apd principal Andrew Kotchen. “There’s also a carefully calibrated balance of privacy and open views that makes the small space work.”

    Architect: Workshop/apd
    Landscape architect: Gunn Landscape Architecture


    Courtesy Future Green Studio

    345 Meatpacking


    The young Brooklyn-based firm Future Green Studio is known for incorporating vegetation into architecture in innovative and surprising ways. For this building, designed and developed by DDG, Future Green drew on the informal vegetation of the High Line, integrating plantings into the building’s parapet, cantilevered marquee, and on the 8,000-square-foot shared and private roof. “Landscape can help situate a building in its context,” said David Seiter, principal at Future Green. “People are drawn to the wildness and style of the Highline.”

    Architect: DDG
    Landscape architect: Future Green Studio



    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articl...5#.VVxBF0Y98gQ

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