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Thread: Manhattan Residential Development

  1. #871
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    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime
    November 28, 2005


    New Chelsea condo building to have zigs and zags and sidewalk skylights





    Madison Equities is planning a very striking, 12-story, residential condominium building at 447 West 18th Street that will have a very complex, angled façade clad with blue-tinted glass.

    The $59 million project will have 47 apartments and groundbreaking is scheduled for February with occupancy planned for early 2007.

    Audrey Matlock is the architect.

    The mid-block building will replace two warehouses.

    There will be 7 one-bedroom apartments of about 800 square feet each, 28 two-bedroom units ranging in size from 1,300 to 1,500 square feet, 8 three-bedroom units ranging in size from 1,700 to 1,830 square feet and 4 duplex artist’s one-bedroom apartments, each with their own street-level entrance, that will have about 2,000 square feet each.

    The duplex artist’s apartments will have gallery spaces illuminated by translucent skylights that form an extension of the sidewalk, according to Robert Gladstone, the principal of Madison Equities.

    Mr. Gladsone has developed some of the city’s more interesting projects such as the Galleria at 115 West 57th Street, the concave office tower on the northwest corner of 57th Street and Lexington Avenue and the handsome residential tower on the southeast corner of Second Avenue and 93rd Street. Madison Equities also is building a 15-story mixed-use building at 410 East 92nd Street that will house a 226-room Courtyard by Marriott Hotel and about 40,000 square feet of commercial space when completed in January and a 32-story rental apartment tower at 410 East 92nd Street with JBC Fund I, which is managed by the John Buck Company of Chicago and was recently completed.

    Ms. Matlock told CityRealty.com today that the translucent skylights will be laminated glass in five-foot-square sections and that they will be adjacent to the indented lobby and duplex apartment entrances that are tucked five feet behind the project’s building line.

    The apartments will have enclosed bedrooms but many will have sliding walls to make spaces more flexible.

    Ms. Matlock said that the façade will be blue glass, be angled horizontally in zig-zag fashion and will have openable windows. She said that details have not yet been finalized, but the openable windows are likely to project outward parallel to the façade, letting air in, and out, on all four sides, an approach that would be new to New York. Each floor has three bands of windows, Ms. Matlock said, and she referred to the openable windows as visual "dashes" on the facade.

    The angled façade does not protrude behind the building line but has a three-foot depth, according to Ms. Matlock, who added that the angles are irregular.

    A caption in an article by Dennis Hevesi in yesterday’s New York Times about the project described the façade as "vitreous splendor."

    Mr. Gladstone said he has known Ms. Matlock for more than a decade and that this project recently was declared by the best "unbuilt" building by the Long Island Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Ms. Matlock, who once worked for Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, has an office in Manhattan as well as one in Sag Harbor, Long Island.

    The building, which promises to be one of the most exciting architectural of the new crop of residential projects, is setback at the eighth floor to conform with zoning regulations. The building is "as-of-right," that is, it conforms to building and zoning regulations and does not require public review.

    The rear of the building, Ms. Matlock said, will contain some balconies and terraces on the upper floors and will be highlighted by horizontal "rainscreens."



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    So anybody knows if this one is underconstruction? This one will be great to see. It says that they will have started in february.

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    Default 447 W. 18th

    DOB Records show that the application for "NEW_BUILDING" was submitted on 1.25.06 but "Disapproved" on 3.10.06. The check list of "Items Required" for this application is long ...

    However a "DEMO" application was "Approved" on 2.15.06. It looks like the existing building is 5 stories so it could easily take a number of months to bring it down.

    No doubt the plan is for the arch. team to get the outstanding DOB issues for the new building resolved during Demo.

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    Plan for through-block apartment building in Chelsea not approved





    25-APR-06

    The Landmarks Preservation Commission denied an application for a certificate of appropriateness this morning for a proposed through-block residential condominium project in Chelsea.

    The project of the Roseland Property Company of Short Hills, New Jersey, called for a 16-story structure at 35-41 West 21st Street and an 8-story building at 38 West 22nd Street. The mid-block site now consists of two parking lots and a one-story garage.

    SLCE is the architectural firm for the project, which is within the Ladies’ Mile Historic District.

    The buildings would be connected by a 15-foot-high one-story structure at their rears, which are separated by 60 feet. Both buildings would have their own entrances and elevators.

    The project will contain 113 rental units, seven of them full-floor two-bedroom apartments in the 22nd Street structure, whose handsome and rather modern façade does not have bay windows that are present in the 21st Street proposal.

    James Davidson of SLCE told the commission that the project was in context with its neighbors and that the 21st Street building will have three vertical sections. The outer two have large bay windows and the middle one has slightly receded windows and extends to a 15th floor center “dormer.” The façade consists of a champagne-colored cast stone and clear glass. The base of the ground floor would be Laurentian green granite, Mr. Davidson said, adding that the 22nd Street structure would have no retail space.

    The proposed building is setback at the 15th floor except for the “dormer,” which serves as a central crown or accent.

    One of the commissioners objected that “there is too much going on” and Commissioner Stephen Brynes suggested that the building’s piers were too spindly and perhaps had too many bays. Commissioner Jan Pokorny said he was impressed with the design but said he was “not particularly happy with the hat on top,” referring to the 15th story “dormer.”

    Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, testified that “In overall terms of the architectural language of the proposal, this new building fits into the Ladies’ Mile Historic District,” adding that ”in terms of tone and design details however, HDC feels the design falls short of the mark and needs some significant adjustments before it could be considered ‘appropriate.’ Of particular concern is the piercing of the cornice line on the 21st Street façade by the central bay. In the Ladies’ Mile, buildings tend to have strong horizontal cornices. This punctuated cornice is not in keeping with the characteristics of the district, and is not strong enough to make a real statement. Instead, it appears to be a weak post-Modern flourish more suited for a suburban hotel than a building in a Manhattan historic district.”

    Jack Taylor of The Drive to Protect the Ladies’ Mile District, testified that “this composition seems both lacking in solidity and overly active in fenestration.” “In contrast,” he continued, “the eight-story façade on West 22nd Street is calm and handsome. Our only objection there is its lack of ground-floor retail space.” Mr. Taylor also suggested that the west end for the setback be inset to reduce its visibility from the Avenue of the Americas.

    The building would contain 113,447 square feet of space, including 8,909 square feet of retail space on 21st Street and its permissible size under existing zoning is 121,000 square feet, Mr. Davidson said.

    The land-use committee of Community Board 5 voted earlier this month 4 to 2 to recommend denial of a certificate of appropriateness from the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    Robert B. Tierney, chairman of the commission, suggested that the applicants meet with the commission’s staff to study design changes so that the commission can “revisit” the application.


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    Board of Standards & Appeals holds 2nd hearing on 482 Greenwich Street





    25-APR-06


    The Board of Standards & Appeals held its second hearing this afternoon on an application for variances to permit the construction of an 11-story residential building at 482 Greenwich Street on the northwest corner at Canal Street.

    Red Brick Canal LLC is the developer. It had acquired the site from Arman, the artist who recently died and had maintained an outdoor studio on an irregular, triangular-shaped lot at the address.

    Thomas McKay and Garrett Gourlay are the architects for the project that will employ a synthetic light-colored material as piers on Canal Street, where its height will match that of an adjoining red-brick building to the west, and a glass façade with inset balconies on the east façade on Greenwich Street.

    The discussion centered mostly on “hardship” issues and Bill McCorkin, a cost consultant, told the board that mandated acoustic insulation requires that the project’s triple-glazed windows have more space between the glass. Mr. Gourlay told the board that the building will only have glazing on 40 percent of its facades. He also said that proximity to the Holland Tunnel and soil conditions will require expensive caissons and that its irregularly shaped lot also presented economic hardships to the developer. He said that the project has a “75 percent efficient floor plate” while larger sites can attain 85 percent efficiency.

    Some residents of nearby buildings testified that the area “is a great market for residential projects,” noting that this project has 100 feet of river views and faces a small park.

    Richard Barrett of the TriBeCa Community Association of the Canal West Coalition told the board that there should be legislation to follow up on developers’ “rate of return,” adding that sometimes it is stated at 6 percent and turns out to be closer to 600.

    A resident at 497 Greenwich Street, a new project nearby, challenged assumptions that pricing at 482 Greenwich Street might be about $1,000 a square feet and suggested that a probable range might be $1,300 to $1,800 per square foot for lower floors and $2,500 for upper floors.

    Meenakshi Srinvasan, the chairperson of the board, asked the applicant to provide more details of its costs and comparable values and continued the hearing to June 20.

    Mr. Mckay has indicated that the project would have a large-scale work by Arman, the only one in the city.

    Arman was born as Armand Fernandez in 1928 in Nice, France. In 1947, he met Yves Klein with whom he hitchhiked in Europe. In 1951, he taught at the Bushido Kai Judo School and then served as a medical orderly in the Indo-Chinese War. Influenced by a Kurt Schwitters exhibition in 1954. he began working with stamp ink-pads, in part to critic Abstract Expressionism and in a few years was throwing ink objects at canvases. In 1958 he dropped the "d" in his name, inspired by a printer's error. He proceeded to explore the use of many different materials in her art and assemblages, including rubbish and burnt objects and sliced and smashed objects and organic garbage. In 1964 he had his first museum retrospectives at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.


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    Landmarks commission ponders design for 241 Fifth Avenue





    25-APR-06

    The Landmarks Preservation Commission held a hearing today on a 19-story residential condominium building planned for 241 Fifth Avenue on a site now occupied by a four-story, pink-granite-and-reflective glass commercial building that was erected in 1968.

    The commission did not make a decision but many of its commissioners said they found the project “intriguing” and interesting.

    The developer is 241 5th Ave., LLC, of which Avraham Sibony is a principal. The building is planned to have 76 apartments.

    The quite bold design by Perkins Eastman employs four materials: a “rainscreen” terracotta system, an opaque baked and painted glass, clear glass and silver-colored metal panel coping.

    The building has a symmetrical façade on the avenue but an asymmetrical façade on its south “party” wall
    , which has considerable exposure.

    In addition, it “floats” its setback upper floors in a form that a couple of commissioners described by “Cubist.”

    The mid-block building is located between 27th and 28th Streets and Eran Chen of Perkins Eastman told the commission that its design attempts to make a meaningful transition between a higher building just to its north and the 7-story building just to its south and the 5-story Museum of Sex on the northeast corner at 27th Street.

    The property falls within the Madison Avenue North Historic District.

    The building rises 14-stories, then has a setback for one floor and the remainder of the top of the building is cantilevered 6 feet forward towards Fifth Avenue. The building is 210 feet tall, not counting an elevator and staircase housing on the roof that adds an additional 8 feet or so.

    The Fifth Avenue façade is “regular,” he continued, but the south façade has a staggered fenestration pattern in part reflecting regulations about “lot-line windows” that limit the number of windows above adjoining buildings on a gradual basis.

    The land-use committee of Community Board 5 voted 5 to 1 earlier this month to deny approval the application. Joyce Matz, the chairman of the committee, said that this design was “certainly not compatible with the historic district.”

    Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, told the commission today that “The typical building in the historic district is characteristically commercial and regular in façade rhythm.” “We are not opposed to contemporary architectural vision, but this has to have a logic and strength of character to make the expression comprehensible. This building does not exhibit that character, and instead references a number of distinctly residential flourishes which are out of place in the district,” he maintained.

    Many of the most famous commercial buildings in the area, however, are in the process of being converted to residential uses such as the MetLife Tower at 1 Madison Avenue, the International Toy Center at 200 Fifth Avenue and 1107 Broadway, and the Gift Building at 225 Fifth Avenue and there are several conversions also progressing nearby on Madison Avenue.

    “The top box seems feather-light compared to the base….A massing suggestion that might aid this design, would be the inclusion of another setback towards the top to help generate a profile more characteristic of the neighborhood,” Mr. Bankoff said.

    Commissioner Jan Pokorny said that the design was “terrific.” Commissioner Thomas Pike said it gave him “a very positive feeling” and was “on the right path,” adding that the vertical supports for the top floors needed to be “more solid” and that the base needed more “depth.” Commissioner Roberta Brandes Gratz said she liked “the Cube.” Commissioner Richard Olcott said he found the design “quite intriguing” and “lively” and that “it seems like the building wishes it was not standing at mid-block.” Commissioner Stephen Brynes found the “vaporization” of windows on the south façade “provocative.”


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    Blanca, new condo building at 206 East 73rd Street, opens sales office





    26-APR-06

    Cayre-Synergy 73rd, LLC, a joint venture of Midtown Equities and Synergy, has opened a sales office for Blanca, a new 10-unit residential condominium building it is developing at 206 East 73rd Street.

    The six-story building between Third and Second Avenues has a triplex penthouse, two four-bedroom, triplex maisonette apartments and 7 two-bedroom loft units.

    Michael Gadaleta of MG New York is the architect.

    Prices for the apartments, which will be available for occupancy in September, range from $2.2 to $5 million, according to Shaun Osher, president of CORE Group Marketing.

    Two tri-level maisonettes offer four bedrooms, three baths, two powder rooms and a cellar with a wide open area complete with wet bar. The units have about 3,300 square feet of space, fireplaces and French doors leading to an outdoor patio and garden.

    Two-bedroom lofts with 1,633 square feet of indoor space and balconies and terraces.

    The three-level, three-bedroom penthouse has over 4,000 square feet of interior and exterior space. It features a two-story living room with a dramatic 20-foot ceiling and a fireplace, as well as a glass wall with sliding glass doors that open to a 400-square-foot terrace. The third level has a 1,000-square-foot private roof deck.

    The building has a cast stone façade with glass balconies and a private-key elevator.

    Each apartment includes a SieMatic kitchen with a center-island, cabinets of matte white lacquer, and appliances from Miele, Sub Zero, and Wolf. Master bathrooms feature marble flooring, a marble-surround soaking tub, and a separate oversized shower with stainless steel penny tile flooring, marble stone slab seating, and a custom niche shelving of solid oak. They also include glass mosaic tiles, which stretch to the ceiling, and double sink vanities with an illuminated medicine cabinet.

    Apartments have the Siedle 611 Series Fiber Optic Security System, that includes a color-screen monitor intercom and one-key access via key-card.


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    Excavation work proceeding at 100 West 18th Street





    26-APR-06

    Excavation work is proceeding at 611 Avenue of the Americas on the southwest corner at 18th Street where Gerald Brauser is building 10-story residential condominium apartment building with 41 units.

    The building will have a 100 West 18th Street address and irridescent black brick facades. Garrett Gourlay is the architect. He is also designing a 52-story condominium apartment building for Mr. Brauser at 111 Washington Street and recentrly designed Vesta 24, a 14-story, 22-unit residential condominium at 231 Tenth Avenue between 23rd and 24th Streets.

    The building is being constructed "as-of-right," that is, within existing building and zoning regulations.

    The building will have a two-story retail base and five setbacks above the base.

    The 18th Street façade will have three angled setbacks and the third through the 9th floors will have large windows at the chamfered corner at the avenue and angled corner windows on the third through the seventh floors along the avenue.

    The setback portions of the facades will also have asymmetrical fenestration patterns.

    The site was formerly occupied by a three-story garage.


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    New condo building in SoHo





    27-APR-06

    The Arun Bhatia Development Corporation has started marketing for a new residential condominium project at 139 Wooster Street in SoHo.

    Designed by Beyer Blinder Belle, the development fronts on both Wooster Street and West Broadway and contains 16 apartments.

    The development consists of two 8-story buildings connected by a “Zen” garden with bamboo, a Japanese Maple tree, perennial flowerbeds, a unique water feature and a Brazilian Ipe wood deck.

    The façade on Wooster Street reflects a contemporary version of the historic cast iron buildings nearby, while the West Broadway façade is a modern version of the typical brick buildings of the late 19th century.

    The two- to four-bedroom units range in size from about 1,447 to 4,252 square feet and have 11-foot-high ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, Bosch washer and dryers, and Brazilian wide-plant, white oak floors. Kitchens have granite countertops, Italian Wenge wood base cabinets and SubZero and Miele appliances. Bathrooms are clad in Oyster Beige marble, and have Lagos Azul limestone countertops and Neptune “Zen” soaking tubs.

    The building has a 24-hour doorman/concierge and a fitness center.

    Occupancy is anticipated for late this year.

    Prices range from $1,920,000 to $7,995,000.

    Arun Bhatia Development Organization’s other major residential projects in Manhattan include The Strand, The Capri, The Dunhill, The Whitney, The Park East, and The Chelsea Regent.

    The site was acquired from Hyatt Hotels for $9,800,000 in 2004.


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    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime
    Excavation work proceeding at 100 West 18th Street

    The site was formerly occupied by a three-story garage.
    Incomplete and deceptive statement: also on the site were two beautiful 100+ year old red brick buildings at 108-110 W. 18th St. (one 4-stories, one 5-stories) with fantastic detail. Now gone to the wreckers ball.

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    Eight floors being added to five-story building in TriBeCa





    28-APR-06

    Eight floors are being added to a five-story loft building at 92 Warren Street in TriBeCa to create a 13-story residential condominium building with 12 apartments.

    The mid-block building is between Greenwich Street and West Broadway and is one block below Chambers Street. The location is convenient to Ground Zero and the civic center.

    Marketing for the project has just begun.

    The apartments will have fireplaces and central air-conditioning and some units will have 20-foot ceilings, private terraces and double-height, arched windows.

    The building is setback at the 6th floor and there are balconies on the 8th, 9th, 10th and 12th floors, a terrace on the 11th floor and arched windows on the 2nd through the 4th floors.

    The building has a distinctive top with a pair of double-height window deparated by a tall pier that extends to the roof.

    Master bathrooms will have Calacatta marble walls and radiant heated stone floors.

    92 Warren LLC, which is affliated with Wilfrid Aubrey Associates LLC, is the developer and it obtained a mortgage on the property in December from the Corus Bank.

    Prices for the two- and three-bedroom apartments start from about $2,000,000.


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    ^^^It looks like a Tiki Mask. No more evil spirits on that block.

    Anyone got photos of the "beautiful 100+ year old red brick buildings at 108-110 W. 18th St. (.....) with fantastic detail" that were torn down for that black and mirrored glass thing?

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    Development Costs Make Rentals Scarce


    By MICHAEL STOLER
    April 27, 2006

    Take a look at the New York City skyline. Construction is booming throughout the five boroughs. Hundreds of residential units are being developed, and the majority of them are condominiums. Due to the astronomical cost of land, construction, and other costs, less than 2% of all new residential developments are being built as rentals. The director at Eastern Consolidated Properties, Alan Miller, said, "Exorbitant construction costs for high-rise residential development make building a rental tower prohibitive for nearly all ground-up projects in the city. Unless land has been owned for five to 10 years at a minimum - which can be a lifetime in New York City - the lid will remain on any substantial number of new construction rental housing units in Manhattan. Even with city and governmental incentives that may be available today, the high barriers to entry in the N.Y.C. marketplace will limit the amount of new rental product that comes online for the foreseeable future."

    The two largest components of residential development are the cost of land and cost of construction. Industry leaders say construction costs have risen more than 30% over the past year. Construction costs in Manhattan today range from $275 to $450 a square foot, depending on the complexity of the project and the finishes within the units. In certain instances, the cost of construction for ultra-luxury condominiums is nearing $750 a square foot. In Brooklyn and Queens, construction costs range from $200 to $300 a square foot, depending on the project, its location, and whether the building is being constructed by a union contractor. The president of Triangle Equities, Lester Petracca, said, "Combined with increased construction costs, sometimes to a level nearing $300 per square foot for hard costs only, the high cost of land has prohibited rental development throughout the outer boroughs."

    Mr. Miller said, "With the intense competition to secure land in the Big Apple from local, domestic, and an increasing number of international companies seeking a piece of the rock to construct the best new condominiums, high land prices prohibit new rental product coming online in the near term for the city."

    He added, "For the best locations, like corner properties in Midtown - for example Macklowe Properties' recent purchase of the Drake Hotel - the market still seems never-ending.With a strong retail component, you can average down the cost to $300 to $400 a developable foot after carving out value of retail." The cost of the actual land sold for $942 a developable foot.

    ***

    In certain neighborhoods, such as TriBeCa and Chelsea, developable land is selling for more than $450 a foot. Mr. Miller said, "I have under contract a development site on a corner location in Chelsea at $440 and another site selling for in excess of $500 a developable foot, side streets still attaining prices of $300 a developable foot and there are as many new buyers to the market as ever." A partner at a prominent investment sales brokerage company said, "What I've been hearing from developers is that they only want prime locations, in such locations as on West 57th Street. In that way, when the condo market continues to soften, their locations will differentiate their product."

    Cost of developable land in Brooklyn is ranging from $125 to $200, with prices of $225 to $250 for waterfront views. A principal at Muss Development, Jason Muss, said, "Land is hovering in the $80 to $120 per square foot range in Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods that offer reasonable access to mass transit into Manhattan and that have enough FAR to allow for efficiencies of scale. Land in areas that are considered hot, such as DUMBO or Flushing, might go for $150. I don't believe people are actually attaining the $200 per square foot price thrown around for Brooklyn and Queens, but everyone wants to start there. As such, those deals won't happen and that land will sit until the given landowner becomes more realistic."

    Mr. Miller said that his firm recently sold 447-49 Fulton Street for more than $200 a square foot. Prices in prime Long Island City locations are ranging from $150 to $200 per developable foot and have increased significantly since a city rezoning. Mr. Miller said that in July 2004 his firm sold a site at 45-56 Pearson St. off Jackson Avenue across from Citicorp Tower, for $65 a developable foot. He said that only six months after the closing, the property was resold for more than double the price. "Waterfront sites are selling for 25% to 50% higher," Mr. Miller said. In the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, 60-90 Metropolitan Ave., on the former site of the Old Dutch Mustard company, sold for $25 million, or nearly $200 a square foot.

    ***

    The chairman of Massey Knakal Realty Services, Robert Knakal, said, "We have seen a noticeable flight to quality in the development business. Only the most prime sites are holding their value. Sites in secondary and tertiary locations are seeing reduction in pricing of 5% to 20%." The president of the City Investment Fund, Thomas Lydon, said, "Overall, land prices are stable to trending downward. There is more flexibility on the part of sellers of land. Construction cost increases and rising interest rates should continue the downward trend - perhaps 10% to 15% - over the next 12 months. Developers are monitoring current sales prices of projects being delivered to see if condominium sales prices can allow them to pass on construction increases. If it stays fairly strong, then landowners will continue to have good liquidity. However, any hiccups in absorption will have direct negative impact because construction lenders are tightening up their underwriting, and will reduce land draws."

    The managing partner of the Clarett Group,Veronica Hackett, said, "Lenders are tightening their underwriting for new residential condominiums."A senior broker at Besen & Associates, Larry Ross, said, "Sellers still have unrealistic expectations based on what they have seen over the last year, so much so that they are reluctant to reduce their asking price. This disconnect has slowed down the overall pace at which development sites are trading.What you see are still high asking prices with much lower bids that reflect the increase in construction costs and interest rates."

    Mr. Miller summed up the general feeling of industry leaders on the state of the market when he said, "The city has unbelievable resiliency on this limited island, and in my opinion will definitely be facing some resistance in the next six to 12 months. Rising interest rates, end unit condo sales stabilizing, and the meteoric rise in construction pricing will definitely lead to a softening in land per square foot sales. Nevertheless, benchmark pricing records continue to be set for every available buildable site that comes to market."


    © 2006 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

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    Residential construction booming in NYC


    by Tom Fredrickson
    April 28, 2006

    At a time when residential construction is cooling nationally, it's on fire in New York City.

    New York City builders filed permits to pour $665 million into new residential construction in the first quarter of 2006, 55% more than the comparable period of last year's torrid pace, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    The number of units permitted increased by 30% to 7,697 over the same period. "It's pretty much unprecedented," says city Building Commissioner Patricia Lancaster.

    The growth is being driven by the surging value of residential property, which makes it easy for builders to make the numbers work on residential projects, Ms. Lancaster says. What's more, the growth is largely unhampered by zoning restrictions because many areas of the city allow for much denser housing than exists presently.

    The following is a breakdown by borough:

    Staten Island leapt 385% to 296 units, with a 387% increase in residential construction value.

    Manhattan experienced a 38% rise in permits, to 2,466, with a 68% increase in construction value.

    Queens permits surged 51% to 1,647 units, with a 69% increase in value.

    Brooklyn saw a 2% increase in number of units permitted, rising to 2,265, with a 20% increase in construction value.

    The Bronx saw a 38% jump in units permitted, rising to 1,074, with a 64% increase in construction value.


    ©2006 Crain Communications Inc.

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    This doesn't look quite as bad as this rendering shows it, mainly because Warren St is narrow enough that your view is mainly dominated by the bottom five stories, not the topknot.

    It's right next door to a decent-size parking lot, which presumably will one day be filled with another residential building. This street is going to be very desirable once the Whole Foods moves into 101 Warren -- not to mention Goldman Sachs a couple blocks away starting in 2009.

    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime
    Eight floors being added to five-story building in TriBeCa


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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    ^^^It looks like a Tiki Mask. No more evil spirits on that block.

    Anyone got photos of the "beautiful 100+ year old red brick buildings at 108-110 W. 18th St. (.....) with fantastic detail" that were torn down for that black and mirrored glass thing?
    Been searching for pics but can't find any. They're "beautiful" in the sense of beingsimple, no frills, strong; the larger of the two has terrific looking sandstone (?) banding running across the facade.

    Far better looking than the aptly-titled "Tiki Mask" that is going up in Tribeca ...

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