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Thread: Manhattan Residential Development

  1. #106

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    The ~50 story tower mentioned before being designed by SOM.
    400 Fifth Avenue



    Check out the AIANY Design Awards 2004 for more renderings and other projects.
    http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004

  2. #107

  3. #108

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    January 16, 2005

    MURRAY HILL

    To Save Itself, a Church Sells the Air, and So Goes a Little Bit of Sun

    By JAKE MOONEY


    A church annex on East 29th Street may make way for a tower.

    Most days, the last direct sunlight to fall on the Church of the Transfiguration on East 29th Street, just east of Fifth Avenue, comes around noon. The 155-year-old Episcopal house of worship, commonly known as the Little Church Around the Corner, is a humble edifice, ringed largely by taller buildings that blot out much of its sky.

    In the coming year, the property may sit under even more shade. Church officials have a contract with a development firm, the Clarett Group, to sell their air rights, along with a two-story auxiliary building just to the east. The building will be demolished, and the property combined with another lot to make way for a new residential tower.

    Though the final height of the structure has not been determined, it will be nearly as tall as the 50-story apartment tower that opened across 29th Street from the church in 1999, said Ruthann Richert, a member of the vestry, the church's governing board.

    The sale, which was first reported by the real estate Web log Curbed.com, has led to grumbling among some nearby residents, who say the building will further impede views in a part of the city where tall buildings are sprouting up with regularity. There have also been complaints from some church members who said the sale price, which was not publicly disclosed, was too low.

    But Ms. Richert, who also serves on the church's building and grounds committee, said officials made the best deal they could to raise money for much-needed maintenance and to ensure that the church, a popular tourist spot with some 150 active parishioners, remains open as long as possible. "A lot of things need to be taken care of," she explained, "and we're sort of just scrounging."

    The church's precarious financial situation is common among churches in New York, she said. And because the church is protected by both city and federal landmark designations, all it could offer developers were air rights and the nonlandmarked auxiliary building, at 11 East 29th Street.

    Clients of a center for the elderly in the building will most likely be absorbed by other Episcopal centers, Ms. Richert said. The other church offices there will move into the first four floors of the new building, alongside retail space and an auditorium.

    The demolition and construction are to begin by the summer, and in a part of Manhattan where tall buildings have become the norm, there is little organized opposition.

    "In the best of all possible worlds, I wouldn't like to see another monster, especially cheek by jowl with the one across the street," said Jack Taylor, a member of Community Board 5, which represents the area. "But if the zoning allows it and the developer has bought air rights from the church, what can you do about it?"

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    The ~50 story tower mentioned before being designed by SOM.
    400 Fifth Avenue



    Check out the AIANY Design Awards 2004 for more renderings and other projects.
    http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004
    ESB needs some younger brothers and sisters. Seems like she'll be getting a few more in the next couple of years.

  5. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    Not to sound dumb, but is this on Canal St? If so, what's the cross st? I like it wherever it is, though.

  6. #111

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    Derek, any information on the Canal Street Hotel? Is it on the database I posted.

  7. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by billyblancoNYC
    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer
    What do you do?
    I started working in Real Estate for Citi-Habitats.
    That sounds interesting. Good luck with it.

  8. #113

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    Is all this development for the Rich? Where is all the money coming from for this?

  9. #114
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    Banks have lots of money.

  10. #115
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    NEW APARTMENTS?

    The Associated supermarket on Columbus Ave. near W. 83rd St. wasn't glamorous - but everybody who lives nearby shopped there, or went to the True Value store on the second floor for housewares, school supplies and such.

    But Stewart Schneider - who ran the stores - and his brothers sold the building at 466 Columbus Ave. for $7.15 million, public records show. The stores recently closed.

    The buyer, Fred Rudd, owns and manages a portfolio of New York City apartment buildings. So there's much speculation that Rudd's going to tear the place down for an apartment building. Though the upper West Side is one of the most-developed residential nabes imaginable, new apartment projects are proliferating.

    It's not certain whether Rudd is going to jump on the development bandwagon - he didn't respond to a call.

    And Schneider doesn't know what Rudd's plans are. The former store owner said he introduced other supermarket operators to Rudd as tenants. But Rudd wanted a rent that's twice what they were willing to pay, Schneider said.

    Schneider's got his own concerns right now. He's at loose ends after the sale of the Associated, which his family owned for 45 years.

    "This was my life," Schneider said. "I'm totally depressed."


    Originally published on January 17, 2005

    All contents © 2005 Daily News, L.P.

  11. #116
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    Further north, West End Avenue is a solid double row of apartment houses - or almost solid. On one of the only spots with a single-story retail building - the corner of W. 70th Street - a 26-story residential tower is planned.

    It is definitely going to happen!!! They are closing all the stores at the site. Including the Food Emporium. I sure hope they don't look like the towers to the south. You know those big 'West End Houses'.

  12. #117
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    January 2005

    New project pushes Chelsea frontier west

    By Steve Cutler


    To jaded Manhattanites, the residents of western Chelsea’s newest condominium development once belonged in distinguished company – think Lewis and Clark or Vasco de Gama — in the pantheon of explorers in unknown territory. The westernmost reaches of the neighborhood were the last frontier.

    Aileen Grossmann, director of sales for The Heywood, a new luxury condominium conversion of a prewar printing house on Ninth Avenue and 26th Street, doesn’t go that far, but admits mention of the area still raises an eyebrow or two.

    "A lot of people look at us like we’re pioneers," she says. "It’s like with the Chelsea Mercantile when it opened on 25th Street and Seventh Avenue. People said, ‘I don’t want to live way over there.’"

    The building’s location in western Chelsea is an interesting one. It’s near a large low-income housing project, and steps from the greatest concentration of contemporary art exhibitions in the world.

    According to Fionn Campbell, an independent Chelsea broker, "the city buildings haven’t prevented over 240 art galleries and very chic restaurants from moving here."

    Campbell’s was the first sale made at The Heywood, a three-bedroom, 2,000-square-foot corner apartment to an international artist seeking a New York pied-ŕ-terre.

    The project is developer Henry Justin’s second conversion of an historic commercial building into a luxury condominium. He also converted the Cass Gilbert at 130 West 30th St., in the mostly commercial garment district. That development saw 45 luxury apartments snapped up in 45 days – the fastest selling project in the history of Douglas Elliman, according to the company.

    The conversion of the Gilbert, named for the great architect who designed it, was performed under Landmarks Commission supervision, after "two years, four dozen meetings with planning boards, the planning commission, Landmarks, the city council and subcommittees," says Justin.

    In contrast, "The Heywood comes to me as a gift," Justin says. "Here I had a 10-story architecturally significant building with 50-unit approval from the Buildings Department. My love is doing restoration of turn-of-the-century buildings, turning them into high-end residential units."

    Built in 1913, the building is a monument to prewar durability. "It has four feet of concrete between floors," says Grossman. "The city could go under, but this building will stay."

    Within reason, Justin’s restoration is trying to keep to prewar standards. "In Manhattan, most people like to sheetrock their ceilings," he says. "I have four guys, arms flailing eight hours a day, putting close to six coats of PlasterWeld, StructureLite, a full coat of gypsum and four coats of compound. I want to give them the building as close to the way it was made 100 years ago as possible."

    The Heywood’s marketers hope its prewar dimensions may sway some prospective buyers to trek another few blocks north and west. Its commercial past means it has 12-and-a-half- to 13-and-a-half-foot ceilings, as well as a healthy number of eight- by 13-foot windows. The smaller windows let in lots of light at eight by 10 feet.

    Once Justin decided on the footage for the apartments, opting for five loft-style units per floor, he turned to Shamir Shah, the New York designer who also designed 260 Park Avenue South, who was so enthusiastic he purchased an apartment in the project for himself. "Henry seems to favor larger, more spacious apartments where so many projects squeeze on the square footage," Shah says.

    Shah calls the interiors stylistically "transitional."

    "They are to a degree informed by the history of the building," he says, "but they take advantage of new and interesting materials, and the detailing on the inside tends to be streamlined and modern," in keeping with artistic North Chelsea and its "younger, fashion forward sort of crowd."

    Amenities include four-inch-wide white oak flooring, Shaker-style eight-foot doors, central heating and air conditioning and washer-dryer units. The oversized kitchens contain custom handcrafted white oak cabinetry, limestone countertops and Sub-Zero refrigerators. Master baths will feature marble countertops and tub decks with large soaking tubs and Toto water closets.

    The Heywood offers four ground floor duplexes, ranging in size from 2,140 to 3,000 square feet, with large recreation rooms, priced below the market rate at under $700 per square foot. Four of the five penthouses are duplexes as well, two of which have spacious outdoor terraces. The largest penthouse is listed at $3.7 million.

    Apartments on remaining floors include one-bedrooms with a home office or den, two-bedrooms with media rooms and three-bedrooms with three full baths. Prices range from $1.3 million to $2.2 million.

    Scheduled for occupancy this summer, the Heywood opened for sales in November and sold 25 percent of its units in a few weeks.


    Copyright 2003-2005 The Real Deal.

  13. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    The ~50 story tower mentioned before being designed by SOM.
    400 Fifth Avenue



    Check out the AIANY Design Awards 2004 for more renderings and other projects.
    http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004
    I couldn't find the other photos. Can you post them? I saw somehere renderings of a bizarre looking facade and hope that they're not accurate.

  14. #119
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    The placement of that rendering is wrong. The building will be across the street on the west side of Fifth.

  15. #120

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    Do you have any other renderings? I saw some on SSP that looked retarded with some bizarre surface.

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