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Thread: Queens Neighborhoods

  1. #16
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    Lofter, I'm willing to be you're a fan of Todd Haynes' Superstar:


  2. #17
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Great viewing ^^^ for a cold winter night .

    What's not to love?

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    I just noticed the Bensonhurst Barbie. Bensonhurst is an immigrant neighborhood and couldn't be more different than the description.

    What about the Sunset Park Barbie? I didn't know a neighborhood of Mexican and Chinese immigrants would be evocative of a Barbie straight out of Deliverance.

    Upper West Side Barbie with a Hummer? Hummers are ghetto. The Upper West Side is the polar opposite of ghetto and probably has one of the lowest car ownership rates in the city. Even stranger is alleged country club membership on the Upper West Side. There probably isn't a country club within 15 miles of 72nd and Broadway. Bergen County would have the closest country club.
    Hummer is ghetto? Definitely not.

  4. #19
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    I think he meant declasse

  5. #20

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    Hummer: Proof positive that money doesn't buy taste or class.

    Hummer: Gentlemen, drive something that will let women know exactly how small your penis is.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    I just noticed the Bensonhurst Barbie. Bensonhurst is an immigrant neighborhood and couldn't be more different than the description.

    What about the Sunset Park Barbie? I didn't know a neighborhood of Mexican and Chinese immigrants would be evocative of a Barbie straight out of Deliverance.

    Upper West Side Barbie with a Hummer? Hummers are ghetto. The Upper West Side is the polar opposite of ghetto and probably has one of the lowest car ownership rates in the city. Even stranger is alleged country club membership on the Upper West Side. There probably isn't a country club within 15 miles of 72nd and Broadway. Bergen County would have the closest country club.
    well he did way it was outdated...

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by clubBR View Post
    Hummer is ghetto? Definitely not.
    Hummers are definitely ghetto. I only see them in working class or poor neighborhoods, and they're usually driven by some wanna-be thug. Along with Escalades, they scream ghetto.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The Terminator and His Hummer


    California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger stands with
    General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz while refueling
    the HUMMER H2H. The H2H is not intended for production.
    (General Motors/Dan MacMedan)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASchwarz View Post
    Hummers are definitely ghetto. I only see them in working class or poor neighborhoods, and they're usually driven by some wanna-be thug. Along with Escalades, they scream ghetto.
    Then you must not get out much.

  10. #25

    Talking

    yeah thanks for the barbie post.. funny!

  11. #26
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    I don't want to encourage a hummer tangent, but if you haven't seen FUH2.com, you should.


  12. #27
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    What a great website. I feel inspired!

  13. #28
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    Corona, Queens

    City Living: Corona, Queens





    By Miranda Siegel
    October 4, 2007

    More than 150 years ago, residents of what is now Corona were hunting grouse, harvesting pumpkins and raising cattle. Then the advent of the Flushing Railroad in 1853 transformed the farmland -- branded West Flushing to appeal to developers -- into a thriving urban center.

    Shortly thereafter, West Flushing was changed to Corona (the "crown jewel of Long Island") to distinguish it from the neighboring town of Flushing.

    Long an intimate Italian enclave, Corona has in recent years developed into a burgeoning Spanish-speaking community. Koreans and Chinese are also calling Corona home.

    "Walking through here, it's like a little United Nations," said Roman Collado, who came to Corona in the 1970s. "Everyone brings their food and culture to share, and for the most part, everyone helps everyone else."

    Other residents are not as optimistic when it comes to relationships between the different groups.

    "I'd be lying if I said there wasn't any racial tension here," said one resident, who did not want to be named. "I hate to say it, but it's true."

    Despite these negative feelings, there is evidence that different populations have been able to find a common ground.

    "I love this one Chinese restaurant," proclaimed resident Arturo Saenzde Viteri. "They do Spanish food and Chinese food, and they do both perfectly. The owners are Chinese, but they speak perfect Spanish."

    Find it
    Corona is defined by Junction Boulevard to the west, Flushing Meadows Corona Park to the east and the Long Island Expressway to the south.

    TO EAT
    Corona means "crown" in both Spanish and Italian, and you'll see those cultural influences when it comes to local food. Latin American, Dominican and Cuban eateries line Junction Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue; to the south, several Italian restaurants have clustered around Spaghetti Park. Chinese food -- including many Chinese-Spanish restaurants -- has a strong presence as well. Wherever you go, you're sure to be near a tamale cart, ice cream truck or fruit peddler.

    Lemon Ice King of Corona
    If you want to see a Corona resident beam with pride, just mention Lemon Ice King; you'd be hard-pressed to find anything that captures the area's old Italian flavor more than this low-key shop and its handmade ices. Listed on the hand-painted signs are all 29 flavors, including blueberry, licorice, fruit cocktail and peanut butter. Not in an icey mood? Rows of proud candy apples -- encased in caramel, crushed nuts or a candy shell -- are on display in the windows.
    52-02 108th St.
    718-699-5133

    Jardin de China
    In business for almost 40 years, this Chinese-Spanish restaurant is a friendly place to enjoy lobster, congee, sausages and plantains. The menu is huge, and the possibilities are endless.
    37-37 Junction Blvd.
    718-457-5293

    Park Side Restaurant
    Park Side on a Saturday night? As resident Artie Morace said, "Fuhgeddaboutit!" Corona's extraordinarily popular Italian restaurant is the real deal: tuxedoed waiters, valet parking, a large wine list and plenty of local old-timers feasting on classic dishes. After dinner, join in a bocce match in Spaghetti Park across the street.
    107-01 Corona Ave.
    718-271-9274

    Green Field Churrascaria
    This vast, glutton-friendly Brazilian BBQ haven features all-you-can-eat buffets and carved meats for $16.95 (lunch) or $26.95 (dinner) per person. Rabbit, roasted quail and tiny, skewered chicken hearts can be had in addition to a variety of pork, chicken and steak dishes. To keep the meat a-comin', flip a switch at your table -- green for "bring more," red for "we have enough" -- to alert your server.
    108-10 Northern Blvd.
    718-672-5202

    Rincon Criollo
    This 60-year-old restaurant with the "ambiente familiar" first opened in Havana before the owners -- three (then) young brothers -- were forced out. Here they re-established their business, now considered to be one of the best Cuban eateries in Queens. Try the ropa vieja, moros y cristianos, stewed oxtail and mamey shakes.
    40-09 Junction Blvd.
    718-458-0236

    TO PARTY
    A number of restaurants double as bars and clubs; most nights you'll also find live entertainment such as DJs, musicians and singers.

    Estrella Latina
    Entering Estrella Latina is like stepping into an enchanted forest composed of stained glass, mirrors and elaborate moldings. Hang around to savor the visuals and the drinks well into the night; Estrella is open until 4 a.m. daily.
    39-07 104th St.
    718-565-2377

    TO SHOP
    Packed into the main retail strips are numerous shops, most notably 99˘ stores and clothing outlets. A few decent thrift stores are thrown into the mix, but the real stars are the countless bakeries. Pop into one for a tub of dulce de leche, ask for a spoon and a roll, and prepare to gorge yourself.

    Leo's Latticini (Mama's)
    Founded several decades ago, the "Mama's" empire is now run by the original owner's grandchildren and great grandchildren. There's an Italian bakery with a leafy backyard garden, a fresh pasta shop and a salumeria, which is famous Queens-wide for its mammoth, juicy, fresh mozzarella balls. The heroes -- with their cured marbled meats, cold pepperoncinis and vinegar-soaked bread -- are absolutely wonderful.
    46-02 104th St.
    718-898-6069

    TO DO
    Corona's proximity to Flushing Meadows Corona Park is a huge plus. The sheer amount of fun one could have there -- with the museums, sculptures, botanical garden, zoo and playgrounds -- cannot be overstated. (As if that weren't enough, you'll also find Shea Stadium and the USTA National Tennis Center). The park is jammed on weekends and it seems like there's an ice cream truck every 20 feet.

    New York Hall of Science
    Kids go wild for this hands-on science center, which features more than 400 exhibits. The award-winning outdoor Science Playground -- which recalls a life-sized version of the board game Mousetrap -- teaches children various scientific principles as they scramble through nets, crawl into giant rabbit holes, talk through pipes and play with "sun catchers."
    47-01 111th St.
    718-699-0005

    Queens Museum of Art
    Make the journey past the ice cream trucks and shrieking kids to this unexpected, spacious modern art museum in the middle of Flushing Meadows Corona Park. There are many highly regarded works on display, but you'll likely spend half your time spellbound in the dark, eerie space overlooking the world's largest model of New York City. Budget at least 10 minutes to find your and your friends' houses among nearly 900,000 model structures.
    Flushing Meadows Corona Park
    718-592-9700

    World's Fair Remains
    What's left of the 1939 World's Fair? How about the one from 1964? Both events attracted tens of millions of people to Flushing Meadows Corona Park, which boasts a collection of structures built specially for the events. Stones marking two Time Capsules (to be opened 5,000 years from now), bronze sculptures, the Terrace on the Park and the towers of the New York State Pavilion are ripe for exploration. The highlight is the Unisphere, the 140-foot globe looming large over the park's trees.

    Flushing Meadows Corona Park

    Louis Armstrong House
    Satchmo's pad and its original furnishings have been preserved in (almost) the same condition as his wife Lucille left them many years ago. Exploring this time warp is a treat even for those who aren't big trumpet-loving jazz heads: A bright turquoise kitchen, delightfully dated wallpaper, tiny TV sets and flashy mirrored bathrooms can be seen during the museum's one-hour tour. Afterward, head one block over to see the house of Louis' good friend Dizzy Gillespie.
    34-56 107th St.
    718-478-8274

    Spaghetti Park
    Though nobody you talk to is really certain of Spaghetti Park's real name (it's William Moore Park, by the way), it's a place the locals know well. They come to watch bocce matches, attend festivals, shop at the flea markets or simply stake out a bench for the day. "I sit here in this park," said resident Artie Morace. "Every week, my sister comes and we go out to dinner at Park Side. Then I come right back here and sit." Enough said.
    108th Street at 52nd Avenue

    Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center
    America's largest circulating black-heritage collection is housed in this library. There's also an auditorium and art gallery where festivals, concerts and other events are held.
    100-01 Northern Blvd.
    718-651-1100

    Real estate Increasingly, Corona residents are seeing older houses torn down to make room for small, luxury condominiums.

    "They keep knocking down all the old buildings and putting up new ones," said Arturo Saenzde Viteri. Resident Gianni Conti agreed. "The neighborhood is beginning to feel completely different."

    In addition to the new condos, apartments in smaller buildings and two-family houses, as well as a few single-family homes, are what you'll find here.

    Here's a sampling of what it will cost you to live in Corona:

    To rent
    -$825 for a studio in a rent-stabilized building (99th Street at 57th Avenue)

    -$1,000 for a one-bedroom in a private brick house (111th Street at 44th Avenue)

    -$1,150 for a one-bedroom with a backyard

    -$1,300 for a two-bedroom in a private house (107th Street at Northern Boulevard)

    -$1,350 for a luxury two-bedroom (Corona Avenue at 99th Street)

    -$1,700 for a three-bedroom with a balcony (108th Street at 47th Street)

    -$1,600 for a four-bedroom apartment

    -$2,000 for a four-bedroom apartment

    To buy:
    -$109,000 for an L-shaped studio

    -$173,000 for a one-bedroom co-op

    -$238,888 for a two-bedroom co-op

    -$259,000 for a first-floor one-bedroom condo

    -$789,000 for a four-bedroom, two-family Colonial house

    THE BUZZ
    Corona's becoming increasingly crowded as more immigrants make their way to the area, a situation that is causing tension between longtime residents and their new neighbors. Opinions on whether immigrants have come to the United States illegally range from mere speculation to outright assertions.

    "The biggest issues we are dealing with in America are our immigrations policies," said resident Roman Collado. "I appreciate the diverse aspects of the area, but certain problems are especially visible and need to be addressed."

    Some of Corona's Italian residents have expressed concern that the neighborhood is no longer feeling as intimate and "Italian" as it once did.

    "The Italian population here is getting older," said resident Gianni Conti, who was born in Corona. "And they're dying off."

    Q & A WITH ROMAN COLLADO
    Roman Collado has lived in the area since his entire family moved here from the Dominican Republic in the 1970s. He works at the Flushing Manor Rehab Center in Flushing.

    What's your favorite place to eat in Corona?
    Estrella Latina on 104th Street. It's an all-in-one bar, restaurant and club. Plus, its central location makes it easy to get to.

    What's the best aspect of the community?
    This is a community where people interact positively with each other, despite very diverse origins. Also, drugs are controlled now -- it wasn't always like that.

    What's the worst aspect?
    Mainly noise, but it's gotten better. In the '80s, drunks, fights and drug dealers often kept residents up late at night. Thankfully, not so much anymore.

    Why do you live here?
    My family and I are very happy here, everyone knows us and we know everyone else. People trust each other here: Bodega owners help you out by giving you store credit if you can't pay then and there.

    What kinds of people are moving here?
    Lately, immigrants from Central and South America, particularly Mexico and Ecuador. The area is attractive because everyone speaks Spanish: barbers, grocers, bank tellers, priests, handymen. A lot of people in those countries think New York is America, so it's a magnet despite being cold and expensive. They think you can make money -- a lot of money -- here, so they come.

    How has the neighborhood changed?
    It's become more of an immigrant community. I remember there used to be an "ethnic food" aisle at the supermarket; now the aisle has expanded to the entire store.

    THE BASICS
    Queens Public Library
    38-23 104th St., 718-426-2844

    TRANSPORTATION
    Subway: 7 to Junction Boulevard, 103rd Street-Corona Plaza, 111th Street
    Bus: Q48, 58, 23, 72, 66

    CRIME STATS
    The 110th Precinct, which includes Corona and Elmhurst, reported three murders, 26 rapes, 265 robberies and 300 burglaries so far this year. For the same period last year, there were four murders, 30 rapes, 300 robberies and 285 burglaries.

    SCHOOLS
    High School for Art & Business, 10525 Horace Harding Expy.; IS 061, 9850 50th Ave.; PS 014, 100701 Otis Ave.; PS 19, 9802 Roosevelt Ave.; PS 092, 9901 34th Ave.; PS 143, 3474 113th St.; PS 16Q, 4115 104th St.; PS 28, 10910 47th Ave.


    Copyright © 2007, AM New York

  14. #29
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    NYC has come a long way, baby. Twenty years ago, I used to wake up and find crack vials on my front stoop -- in a little starter neighborhood called Park Slope!

  15. #30
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    Now, those Park Slope streets are littered with baby strollers.

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