Page 14 of 32 FirstFirst ... 410111213141516171824 ... LastLast
Results 196 to 210 of 480

Thread: Brooklyn Residential Development

  1. #196
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    I've seen the one on Ocean Avenue. It's like a chronoton wormhole opened to the 60s.

  2. #197
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    Anyone know what is being built or anything about the projects on Bond Street between President & Carroll Streets in Brooklyn?

  3. #198
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    Brooklyn by the numbers
    Bests building benchmark: a look at new condos by neighborhood


    By Stuart W. Elliott
    September 2005

    A condo grows in Brooklyn. And grows and grows and grows...

    Following up on our well-received look at the prospect of a condo glut in Manhattan, The Real Deal set out this month to examine the level of new residential development in Brooklyn, the borough that has boomed in the past several years, luring buyers who are priced out of Manhattan, or who are simply drawn by laid-back neighborhood vibes.

    An analysis of data from the New York state Attorney General's office, which regulates approval of new condo projects, shows that the amount of new development hitting the market in Brooklyn this year will be 25 percent higher than the number of units in 2004.

    Projections show that more than 4,300 units are expected to be approved for sale in the borough this year, compared to 3,100 last year, based on figures for the first seven months of the year.

    That's a smaller jump than in Manhattan, where the amount of new development coming online this year is projected to be double 2004, but impressive all the same. The number of new units added annually in Brooklyn has jumped since the beginning of the decade from 370 in 2000, to 2,203 in 2001, 1,713 in 2002, and 2,450 in 2003.

    Once a haven of cheap rents for hipsters, Williamsburg now sprouts condos. The neighborhood has added 1,991 condominium units in the last five years, the greatest growth of any section of the borough. It's third behind Dumbo and Gravesend in the southern part of Brooklyn in total new apartments added for the year to date.

    After showing plenty of hype, but not much product, Dumbo has added 611 condo units this year, nearly twice as many than were added over the last five years. The growth in inventory is largely the result of two big projects – J Condo, a 31-story building that will be the tallest in Dumbo and Two Trees' converted 70 Washington Street.

    In addition to units approved for sale, the study also looked at projects in the pipeline – offering plans submitted and not yet approved by the Attorney General's office, and offering plans still in the testing phase.

    Brooklyn Heights, a landmark district where there are few new projects, has the most units currently in the pipeline. It is due almost entirely to a 605-unit condo development – the biggest project in Brooklyn in number of units in at least the last five years, and probably ever – at 360 Furman Street, on the waterfront. The Jehovah's Witnesses to RAL Development sold the 960,000-square-foot building last year for a reported $200 million. Williamsburg, Sheepshead Bay, and Fort Greene follow with the next highest numbers of new condos in the pipeline, respectively.

    Despite the construction, what's being built in Brooklyn is still a drop in the bucket in comparison to the existing amount of housing in the city's most populous borough. There are around 930,000 housing units in Brooklyn, 238,000 of which are owned and occupied by their owners.


    Copyright © 2003-2005 The Real Deal.



  4. #199

    Default The Edge

    The Edge

    Williamsburg, NY


    North 5th to North 7th Street, from Kent Avenue to the East River

    Over one million square feet to be developed on the Williamsburg Brooklyn waterfront in a mix of mid-rise buildings and high-rise towers. Known as “The Edge,” the project includes Brownfield remediation, master planning, waterfront permitting and construction. 1,000 residential units will be built over 100,000 square feet of retail space and parking for over 1,000 cars. A waterfront esplanade will be built along the river, with a recreational and water taxi pier built into the river from North 6th Street. Construction will commence by the spring of 2006.

  5. #200
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    ^ It looks like a nice project!

  6. #201
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn
    Posts
    1,278

    Default

    grumble grumble... East Williamsburg seems to be growing.

  7. #202
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Garden City, LI
    Posts
    1,778

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ryan
    grumble grumble... East Williamsburg seems to be growing.
    Ah yes, East Williamsburg...not Bushwick...

  8. #203

    Question About Sheepshead Bay

    I AM LOOKING FOR THE NAME OF A NEW HOTEL OFF EMMONS AVENUE IN SHEEPSHEAD BAY, MAYBE EMMONS AND OCEAN AVE?
    OUT OF TOWNER NEEDS HELP MERYL521A@NETZERO.NETWITH THIS. THANKX

  9. #204
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Either Comfort Inn or Best Western. Dunno if the BW is finished yet.

  10. #205
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    Wow... I found this on the Perkins Eastman website... It looks promising. (I apologize if it has been posted already somewhere)



    http://www.perkinseastman.com

    I assume that this project will have a lot of oposition.

  11. #206
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    Greenpoint's future pushes present prices
    Massive rezoning spurs hopes for residential growth in longtime industrial neighborhood




    The Greenpoint waterfront: The grittiness
    may soon give way to buildings with great views
    of Manhattan



    By Alison Gregor
    October 3, 2005

    The Greenpoint waterfront boasts a lovely view of Manhattan, though a visitor may find themselves climbing over corrugated metal, chain-link fencing, concertina wire and crumbling asphalt just to catch a glimpse.

    But it's a stunning one, and property developers are hustling to capitalize on an unobstructed version. A colossal rezoning of 200 blocks of Greenpoint and Williamsburg passed by the city in May promises to transform the East River waterfront from its current industrial wasteland state.

    Some Greenpoint residents say it's about time. "When I was a teenager, we all used to sit by the water and watch the city lights at night, and it was so pretty," said Laura Lovejoy, a Greenpoint landlord. "And I want that for my kids."

    Zoning regulations will allow dozens of buildings to be constructed on the waterfront stretching from Williamsburg to Greenpoint, but it might take another two decades for full development of the waterfront to be completed.

    At least one parcel in Greenpoint will be built out in the next three or four years. The 20-acre site encompasses a half-mile of waterfront and could see construction of as many as 4,000 units in towers, lofts and townhouses. That's a significant chunk of the 10,000 units expected to be developed under the rezoning.

    "The project will feature a promenade along the waterfront, a 500-foot pier with retail and recreational facilities and a variety of parks and other amenities including a water taxi," said spokeswoman Lauren Cozzi in a press release for developer George Klein at Park Tower Group.

    While Klein has been first with well-de- fined plans, all waterfront developers are obliged to create esplanades on their property at their own expense, unless they opt to hand over its title in exchange for government funding. Greenpoint residents said they're thrilled that decades of dumping, demolition and deterioration in the neighborhood will come to a halt under the rezoning.

    "We fought for a rezoning for at least 20 years," said Joe Vance, co-chairman of the Greenpoint Property Owners, Inc. "Because this community was the proverbial backyard for the entire city, everything no one wanted in their backyard got sent over here."

    That included a radioactive- and hazardous- chemical-waste storage facility, a couple of power stations and lots of pollution, said Vance. In fact, the community is fighting plans for yet another power plant that could be developed in the midst of the waterfront, he said.

    To the north of the Park Tower parcel are two smaller pieces of property that could see residential development. To the south, Huron Towers and Java Street Realty have both asked JWC Architect to work on their developments, according to the Architect's Newspaper.

    Going south from Greenpoint Avenue, a 14-acre parcel is rumored to be slated for development by developer Joshua Gutman, who owns several buildings in Dumbo, and who declined to comment for this article.

    Immediately south of Gutman's parcel is land owned by B & H Photo, Vance said, and a few smaller lots where various owners have no plans that have been made public.

    Those in the real estate industry expect all this development to be a boon for the area.

    "The older people don't like it, because it's like an invasion of their area," said Rosemarie Pawlikowski, a real estate agent for Albero Parkside Realty. "But you have to embrace progress."

    Pawlikowski said apartments in Greenpoint rent upward of about $1,200. Renovated duplex apartments in the brownstones located in the historic district on Milton, Calyer, India and Java streets can rent for as much as $2,400.

    Rental prices have been rising as the traditionally Polish neighborhood sees an in- flux of younger New Yorkers, who spawn coffee houses, chic restaurants like the new Queen's Hideaway, Thai cafes, and boutique stores. Lovejoy said she's seen other landlords charging more than $2,000 a month for a two-bedroom, but she doesn't charge over $1,500 herself.

    "Rents are going up whether they put the new piers in here or not," she said.

    Some residents feel they may not only be priced out by luxurious waterfront development, but their views may be obliterated as well.

    "My boyfriend and I live on the top floor of a four-story walk-up on the waterfront, which is $1,200 a month," said Liz Prybyla, who has lived in Greenpoint for five years. "It's a two-bedroom apartment with the most beautiful view of the city, and it's just going to be gone."

    Community activists like Vance said they fought to limit the height of waterfront towers to 15 or 20 stories, but they lost. Buildings can go up to 40 stories, though developers must make concessions to do so, such as making about 20 percent of the development affordable. Residents will be watching to ensure zoning regulations are enforced.

    "We got the rezoning," Vance said, "so now we're trying to make sure we get what we were promised, from the waterfront parkland to affordable housing."


    Copyright © 2003-2005 The Real Deal.

  12. #207

    Default

    nice find with that Greenpoint project, not sure what I think of it.

    Some more new Brooklyn stuff from Mehandes Engineering, P.C.
    http://mehandeseng.com/projects_residential1.htm

    Never heard of these 2:

    Flatbush Avenue
    Ismael Leyva Architects
    North Developers


    77 Box Street
    Scarano & Associates Architects

  13. #208

    Default Feasibility Study

    Anyone know of anyone who can do a feasibility study for a development in Williamsburg Brooklyn ?

  14. #209
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3

    77 Box Street
    Scarano & Associates Architects
    Map: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=77+Box...0.040443&hl=en

  15. #210
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Interesting Building on 28th Avenue

    One of the more interesting-looking small sidestreet condos is nearly finished on 28th Avenue, between Cropsey and Harway about halfway up the block. I'd be interested in what the longtime observers and posters think about it. Be sure not to miss the rear of the building.

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Astoria Development
    By Kris in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: November 26th, 2014, 04:43 AM
  3. The Final Frontier for Development in Manhattan - Falling re
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 18th, 2003, 05:16 PM
  4. 139 E. 34th Street - Building type, residential?
    By dvinfo in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 1st, 2003, 11:34 AM
  5. E 34th new development
    By tlowe in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 31st, 2003, 05:15 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software