Page 31 of 32 FirstFirst ... 21272829303132 LastLast
Results 451 to 465 of 480

Thread: Brooklyn Residential Development

  1. #451
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,475

    Default

    Brooklyn’s Future of Luxury

    By C. J. HUGHES
    AUG. 22, 2014

    Caton Place, a street that runs for two blocks west of the Prospect Park Parade Ground, was best known for its horse stables, but now plans are underway to turn this short street into a destination for luxury rentals.The developers for 33 Caton Place and 22 Caton Place can’t agree on which Brooklyn neighborhood the street is in: One says Windsor Terrace, the other Kensington. But both seem to concur that renters in the area want apartments with finer finishes, and far more amenities, than what the existing Art Deco and Tudor complexes offer.

    “They are a big departure from the existing housing stock,” said Liam McCarthy, the founder of JMKBK, a local real estate broker specializing in rentals.
    First out of the gate will be 33 Caton, an eight-story, 126-unit building named Kestrel, after a bird of prey spotted in Prospect Park; the building, scheduled to open this fall, is being developed by Sam Boymelgreen, whose father, Shaya, was a prolific condominium developer in the last real estate boom before suffering high-profile setbacks, including lawsuits over his construction.


    A 73-unit rental building at 22 Caton Place is set to be completed next spring.
    Kiss + Cathcart, Architects

    The elder Boymelgreen was a developer of the nearby Park Circle condominiums on Coney Island Avenue. Although there is an overlap between the sales team for Kestrel and many of Shaya Boymelgreen’s Brooklyn projects, he has no role at Kestrel, according to Sam Boymelgreen. The younger Mr. Boymelgreen, however, may not be long for this corner of Brooklyn. He said he put up for sale the entire Kestrel building on Monday, for an asking price of $90 million. Mr. Boymelgreen says he wanted to free up capital for another Brooklyn residential project.

    The interiors of Kestrel’s studios to three-bedrooms will have finishes commonly found in many Manhattan rentals. There will be stainless-steel appliances, and a washer and dryer in every unit, and 108 of the apartments will have some form of outdoor space, ranging from Juliet balconies to private gardens.

    Shared amenities will include a roof with a checkerboard of dining, lounging and grilling areas, lined with synthetic-turf lawns. Downstairs, there will be a parking garage, a pet spa to wash off dogs after muddy walks, and 12 free-of-charge bicycles, decorated with Kestrel’s avian logo.
    But monthly rental rates will reflect these perks. One-bedrooms will start at $2,300, said Brendan Aguayo, the managing director of Halstead Property Development Marketing, which is handling leasing. In contrast, the average asking rent for comparable apartments in Windsor Terrace and Kensington in mid-August was $1,800, according to Streeteasy.com.

    But where is Kestrel exactly? Mr. Aguayo, who grew up in neighboring Park Slope, says it’s clearly part of Windsor Terrace, because the neighborhood’s boundary, Caton Avenue, is a few blocks away. Others agree, pointing out that Caton Avenue divides Brooklyn’s 66th and 72nd police precincts.
    A lack of large development parcels meant this area “has been overlooked for quite a while,” Mr. Aguayo said.


    A rendering of Kestrel, a 126-unit building opening
    this fall at 33 Caton Place.

    For years, the site contained the ruin of a half-built condominium, whose relatively large size prompted an outcry from some locals. In March 2009, the city rezoned much of the area to preserve its low-slung character.

    Kestrel’s slightly smaller neighbor is being constructed across the street at 22 Caton Place. When completed next spring, the building, which is being developed by the Hudson Companies, will have 73 rental apartments, from studios to three-bedrooms, across its seven stories. (The 2009 rezoning did not affect this parcel.)

    As at Kestrel, each apartment will have stainless-steel appliances and washers and dryers; and 64 of the units will also feature yards, balconies or terraces.

    The roof at No. 22 is also designed to be a gathering place, with grills and seating areas, though there will also be a garden plot for each apartment, where residents can grow lettuce or lavender for a $10 monthly fee. There is also a pet spa planned.

    Rents haven’t been set yet, but the race is on to find a name. “We’re trying to think of a bird that eats kestrels,” said Alison Novak, the vice president of Hudson and the project’s manager. But, she argued, the block is squarely part of Kensington, based on conversations with people who live on it.

    Anybody in need of an animal mascot might just look across the street. On Caton and East Eighth Street sits Kensington Stables, the last of its kind on a street once filled with the clop of hooves. It houses 31 horses, said Walker Blankinship, the stable’s manager.

    Stables were prevalent in the area starting in the late 19th century, after the opening of Prospect Park and bridle paths on Ocean Parkway. A stable even stood where Kestrel is today.

    At a party to celebrate a construction milestone this month, Hudson handed out T-shirts whose design includes a trotting horse. “Most people will think a stable is an oddity,” Ms. Novak said, “but an interesting one.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/24/re...xury.html?_r=0
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	24WINDSOR1-master315.jpg 
Views:	104 
Size:	29.5 KB 
ID:	17993   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	24POSTING2-master315.jpg 
Views:	104 
Size:	25.4 KB 
ID:	17994  

  2. #452
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    Bunch of ugly buildings. So sad.

  3. #453
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    99% of all new buildings in the outer boroughs are like this or even worse than this.

    This will be known as an ugly looking city in no time.

  4. #454
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Question

    Was anyone ever creaming their panties over the outer boroughs in the past?

  5. #455
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    626 Flatbush


    ©tectonic

  6. #456
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    09.10.14 Pierhouse












    ©tectonic

  7. #457
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    172 Montague


    ©tectonic

  8. #458
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,475

    Default

    ^ Oh god, kindergarten kids could've done a better job with their paint sets (or whatever) than that!!

    ...no, wait, that's not the finished product...is it?! Why blue?! (promise you won't laugh at me )

    Is this \/ brick veneer?





    http://www.brooklyneagle.com/article...4-01-02-160000

  9. #459
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    The seams in the rendering suggesting prefab panels with brick veneer set into them, but the hanging scaffolding on the building suggests they'll be laying brick the whole way up. Always tough to know from a rendering. In a way, I wish we were more daring with color on buildings. Here's a building I saw in Vancouver that I really liked:


  10. #460
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,475

    Default

    ^ Nice. That bit of colour makes a fairly plain building look quite classy. Just need to get rid of all those power (etc.?) lines . What's that grey cylindrical thing on the right?

    The Residence Inn behind it is much nicer than the kraptastic kaufman et al hotels in NYC, too.

  11. #461
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    Tara I. The foreground, it's the light post. I don't think the hotel is any better than the stuff in NYC. It's just the angle and that I was using my nice camera. Truthfully, most of the ones in NYC could be made to look better than we generally do. Also, I'm not sure about th base of the hotel, which is the major problem with many of the nyc ones. Cutting it off simplifies things.

  12. #462
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    They run the power lines in the alleys in Vancouver.

  13. #463
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    10.12.14

    ©tectonic

  14. #464
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,673

    Default

    11.05.14
    Pierhouse




    BAM South - 286 Ashland


    The Ashland - 250 Ashland Pl


    Avalon Willoughby



    tectonic

  15. #465
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,475

    Default




    This Glassy Thing Will Replace Wood-Clad Boerum Hill House

    by Hana R. Alberts



    In a move that's become all too typical in classic Brooklyn neighborhoods where not every structure is encompassed by a historic district, a crumbling old house has been demolished, and what's set to replace it is something modern and glassy—something that doesn't look like it wants to play nice with its brownstone-y neighbors. Pardon Me For Asking spotted the rendering posted on scaffolding for 159 Smith Street, between Bergen and Wyckoff, and was appalled at its design. The old house was decrepit, PMFA acknowledges, "however, with its height, ornate cornice and window details, it fit perfectly between its two neighbors. Most importantly, it had probably stood there for almost a century." Now, "we can expect a rather bland 5 story glass box. Obviously, neither the architect nor the owner were going for 'contextual.'" Approved permits show it will include eight apartments as well as ground-floor commercial space.

    Good Grief! Is THIS What WIll Replace The Sweet Wood-Clad Building That Stood At 159 Smith Street [PMFA]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1...hill_house.php

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Astoria Development
    By Kris in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: November 26th, 2014, 04:43 AM
  3. The Final Frontier for Development in Manhattan - Falling re
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 18th, 2003, 05:16 PM
  4. 139 E. 34th Street - Building type, residential?
    By dvinfo in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 1st, 2003, 11:34 AM
  5. E 34th new development
    By tlowe in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 31st, 2003, 05:15 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software