Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 46

Thread: George Washington Bridge Bus Station - W 178th Street @ Broadway- by Pier Luigi Nervi

  1. #1

    Default George Washington Bridge Bus Station - W 178th Street @ Broadway- by Pier Luigi Nervi

    LEISURE & ARTS

    A Landmark Destination: The Bus Station

    Pier Luigi Nervi's terminal at the George Washington Bridge is a powerful, handsome place, soot notwithstanding.

    BY ADA LOUISE HUXTABLE

    Tuesday, June 15, 2004 12:01 a.m.



    NEW YORK--A subway ride to MoMA QNS will take you to see the models for Santiago Calatrava's Transportation Hub for the World Trade Center site, a remarkable structure commissioned by the Port Authority of New York that raises technology to the highest level of beauty and utility. They will be on view until Sept. 27.

    A subway ride to 178th Street and Broadway will take you to see Pier Luigi Nervi's bus terminal at the George Washington Bridge, an equally remarkable structure commissioned by the Port Authority more than 40 years earlier, when the Italian engineer was as celebrated as Mr. Calatrava is now.

    Mr. Calatrava's models for a terminal yet to be built are ethereally empty and rendered in pristine white; Nervi's terminal, completed in 1962, is deeply discolored with soot and grime. But what separates these two buildings is more than time and distance, or past vs. future; it is New York's short memory.

    Lavish praise has greeted Mr. Calatrava's glass and steel structure with its ribbed, winglike canopies that admit daylight above and below ground and can be opened to the sky. The same kudos marked the Port Authority's announcement of the Nervi commission, which was also hailed as a visionary act in the early 1960s.

    Mr. Calatrava's position in the 21st century and Nervi's in the 20th are roughly equal. The two men share an international reputation for turning engineering into art. Both make complex things seem dramatically simple, so the untrained observer can sense with pleasure the play of forces held in equilibrium by elaborate calculations and an impeccable eye. In their talented hands, structural design achieves a rational elegance. Because engineering is the heart and soul of construction--the building's bones on which everything else depends for support and stability--structure trumps style.

    But style is there--Mr. Calatrava's forms have extraordinary brio; Nervi, who died at 87 in 1979, practiced with a fine Italian hand. Mr. Calatrava's engineering is a kind of 21st century architecture parlante, transcending the utilitarian to mimick the forms of flight. Sometimes his extravagantly expressionistic gestures go overboard, but his soaring bird is spot on for New York, where tragic circumstances and an unparalleled opportunity require a symbolic act of aesthetic daring.

    If Mr. Calatrava's building is a bird, Nervi's is a butterfly. The bus terminal's rooftop sets of butterfly trusses are echoed in the butterfly entrance canopy that is pure vintage 1960s. In Nervi's structural art, there are no superfluous moves. The beauty of his buildings relies on simple geometry and sophisticated prefabrication. The repeated V-shaped members of the bus terminal's concrete trusses echo the steel cross bracing of the George Washington Bridge.

    Disturbed by reports from guardians of our modernist heritage that the building had suffered neglect and was threatened by change, I went back recently to see how it had fared. My last visit had been a hardhat climb over the newly constructed building with the maestro himself; no fear of heights could have kept me from the experience.

    I found a strong, proud and handsome survivor. Nervi still comes through loud and clear. The building is enormously impressive; neither the soiled and darkened surfaces nor the descent of the concourse into bland tackiness could camouflage its quality. The Port Authority has been a decent, if clueless, caretaker. Bus stations are not known for their high-end ambience; they are often placed in marginal neighborhoods and are notoriously subject to transient abuse. The biggest threat to the building is that the Port Authority totally undervalues, what it is dealing with.

    The terminal is a three-level structure that stretches from the George Washington Bridge to a single-story extension across Broadway. A bus turnaround connecting the two parts bridges Broadway. Buses arrive and depart on the lower and upper levels; between the two is the concourse, with its ticket booths and services.

    Unlike Grand Central Terminal's high-end shops and services, there are no gourmet takeout stores or fancy restaurants for commuters on the run; the most conspicuous tenants are a dentist, a credit union, a video store and an off-track betting facility, which occupies the most space on the concourse and exudes an air of abandoned hope.

    These uniformly dismal enterprises are housed in a zigzag of commercial construction on one side, paralleled by a zigzag of ticket booths on the other side, which may or may not be meant to echo the zigzag bus berths outside at street level. The New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects reports in its journal Oculus that $14 million has been spent by the Port Authority over the past five years. The dominant design factor seems to be the overwhelming need for vigilant maintenance.

    The place was spotlessly clean when I visited, and the restroom--that public barometer of quality of life--immaculate and functioning give or take a few broken hand dryers, was a clear demonstration of the problems faced and solved. Everything visible or usable--toilets, sinks, even mirrors--was of solidly wall-hung stainless steel. On that day, at least, the escalators were working.

    Beyond a vandal-proof minimalism (and don't think trendy asceticism) the aesthetic goes casually downhill to a humdrum mix of bad signage and the unconsciously comic touch of a bronze bust of George Washington, a gift from the sculptor's son, shunted off into a neutral corner. Another bust, of O.H. Amman, the distinguished engineer of the George Washington Bridge, stands with its back to the entrance against a large and lifeless photograph of the bridge; it is a measure of the level of design sensibility that the real bridge is available by looking the other way. There is no sign of Nervi, although I understand his name appears on a plaque outside as consulting engineer, after the Port Authority's chief engineer, John M. Kyle. I don't grudge Mr. Kyle his conspicuous position; he was the man with the vision to hire Nervi.

    Nothing suggests the drama at the top of the escalator that leads to the local commuter bus lines. The angled butterfly trusses, open for ventilation, frame an exhilarating view of the bridge. Huge central columns receive the weight of the trusses, tapering to a dancer's lightness at the floor. Small, curved-roof glass kiosks along the platforms provide attractive and appropriate protection. The narrow, striated pattern of Nervi's concrete aggregate is visible; this is a powerfully handsome place, soot notwithstanding.

    There are on-again off-again proposals to maximize the land use; the idea of unused air rights is anathema to any self-respecting real-estate department, and the Port Authority is no stranger to development. One proposal would have built a cinema multiplex on top of the low Broadway structure. That has not materialized, but the possibilities are apparently being held open.

    The argument is made that because construction over the Broadway section would not touch the main building, Nervi's design would not be compromised. That is ridiculous, of course; the two parts are continuous, and effectively one thing, and any addition will alter the perception and integrity of the whole. This does not mean that every option is foreclosed. But a large and sensitive talent would be required, something that seems to come sporadically to the Port Authority, like every 40 years. In conventional or commercial hands, anything at all would be a disaster.

    Architecture is a mirror of its own moment, and some will prize this building for the hallmarks of Italian design of the '60s--those retro butterfly shapes and touches of aquamarine, and the fine Italian mosaic of the underside of the butterfly canopy that is clearly, and sadly, deteriorating. But unlike the nostalgic and lovable kitsch being championed by those who are unable or unwilling to make distinctions between what is important and what is not, Nervi's Port Authority bus terminal is a work of the first rank that demonstrates the art and science of reinforced concrete construction at its 20th-century highpoint, in the hands of one of its greatest masters. It is inconceivable that this building--in fact, any Nervi building--should not be a designated landmark. Under New York City law, it has already been eligible for a decade. It is time to look uptown.

    Ms. Huxtable, the Journal's architecture critic, last wrote on Louis Kahn.

    www.opinionjournal.com


    http://www.panynj.gov/tbt/aboutGWBBS.htm

    http://www.panynj.gov/tbt/gwbmain.HTM

  2. #2

    Default

    I think the prominence of location and importance guarantees a better future for the Path Station.

  3. #3

    Default

    An Overlooked Modernist Masterpiece

    Pier Luigi Nervi's bus terminal at the George Washington Bridge

    Published in Blueprint, November 2000

    Is intercity bus travel so declasse that it's hard for New Yorkers to take a bus terminal seriously? That's the only explanation for the indifference to the poured concrete masterpiece by Pier Luigi Nervi that spans Broadway at the Manhattan approach to the George Washington Bridge. The building -- a station and attached parking lot, one of Nervi's few completed projects outside Italy -- is a superb example of the poetry he wrought from ferro-concrete, exploring, as he put it, "the mysterious affinity between physical laws and the human senses." Now that affinity is threatened by a planned multiplex cinema, a 50,000 square foot building (not yet designed), to be constructed over the parking lot portion of the Nervi building. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the quasi-public organization that owns the terminal, hopes to move ahead with the plans after a structural survey is completed early next year.

    It is the latest example of New York treating a significant building as a plinth for another, more profitable structure -- the same Port Authority is planning a skyscraper over its other terminal, near Times Square.

    The Nervi building, completed in 1962, begins with a horizontal platform, raised about 30 feet over the street on angled concrete columns. Above the western half of the platform, a second series of columns support 14 triangular projections, bug-eyed clerestories that explore the otherwise neglected middle ground between Corbu and Gaudi. Striking from the outside (approached, as they usually are, from a drab section of Upper Broadway), they are nothing short of thrilling from the inside, where their concrete louvers funnel light to the waiting areas below with a mixture of precision and delight.

    The other half of the platform -- a parking lot -- has nothing on it but cars, and that's where the theater will be built. But the Port Authority, which stands to make millions, hasn't said how the new building will be massed. Even if it the cinema never touches Nervi's skylights, it will obscure them from some directions and compete with them from others.

    Like the Gwathmey-Siegel addition to Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum, overhanging and threatening to overshadow Wright's rotunda, the cineplex will be a looming omnipresence.

    Anything that touches -- or diminishes the effect of -- Nervi's geometry should be off the table. The building was inspired by the George Washington Bridge -- which Le Corbusier called "the most beautiful bridge in the world." Nervi's structure makes clear references to the bridge's criss-cross trusses, rethinking one idiom -- call it "erector set deco" -- in another.

    As in his better-known Palazzo dello Sport in Rome, Nervi (1891-1979) revels in structural predetermination -- the tracery of his vaults is as inevitable as the ribs of a wood canoe -- and in the plasticity of ferro-concrete (his movable forms were made of the same material as the finished building). The brain behind these eyes is both calculating and playful.

    News of the planned cineplex has sent at least one architecture writer -- this one -- scurrying to see the condition of the terminal, which he hadn't visited in years. (It's common for owners to allow non-landmarked masterpieces to deteriorate to the point where no one cares what happens to them -- neglect becoming an excuse for more neglect.) In this case, while the building is far from pristine, the majesty of Nervi's creation is undiminished. The columns supporting the terminal roof are surprisingly moving (their tapering forms and striated surface suggest sequoias, yet without the slightest hint of kitsch). Above, concrete is rendered nearly weightless. The building is on a par with Saarinen's TWA terminal at Kennedy Airport, another reinforced concrete masterpiece that seems to leave the ground. But unlike Saarinen's building, which has achieved iconic status, Nervi's is little known. It has something to do with location, but a lot to do with the fact that boarding a bus to New Jersey (rather than, say, a plane to Paris) is something most New Yorkers prefer to do with eyes wide shut.

    www.fredbernstein.com

  4. #4

    Default

    What Huxtable is missing is that the building is best viewed by helicopter. I viewed it from ground level recently, and it is fine, but nothing special. I don't think the same will be said for the Calatrava terminal.

  5. #5

    Default

    Second Look: George Washington Bridge Bus Station / Pier Luigi Nervi, 1963

    One of Nervi's few completed projects outside Italy is a superb example of the poetry he wrought from ferro-concrete.

    by Fred A. Bernstein

    November 2, 2004


    (Photo courtesy of The Port Authority of NY & NJ - Mara Herbert - Photographer)

    Editor’s note: Second Look is a new series based on Fred Bernstein’s regular column in Oculus, the quarterly magazine of the AIA New York Chapter. It is reprinted here with permission.

    Is intercity bus travel so déclassé that Americans can't take a bus terminal seriously? How else to explain their indifference to the poured concrete masterpiece by Pier Luigi Nervi (1891-1979) that spans Broadway at the Manhattan approach to the George Washington Bridge? The structure – a station and attached parking lot, one of Nervi's few completed projects outside Italy – is a superb example of the poetry he wrought from ferro-concrete, exploring, as he put it, "the mysterious affinity between physical laws and the human senses."

    In 1999, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the building, announced plans to build a 50,000-square-foot multiplex cinema over the parking lot. It was to be just one more example of an architecturally significant Manhattan building becoming a plinth for a more profitable structure. That, of course, was before September 11th; the plan is now on hold. Which is good news for fans of the building.

    The Nervi building is essentially a horizontal platform, raised about 30 feet over the street on angled concrete columns. From the western half of the platform (which is linked by bus lanes to the George Washington Bridge), a second series of columns supports 14 triangular projections – bug-eyed clerestories that explore the otherwise neglected middle ground between Corbu and Gaudi. Striking from the outside (approached, as they usually are, from a drab section of Upper Broadway), they are nothing short of thrilling from the inside, where their concrete louvers funnel light to the waiting areas below with a mixture of precision and insouciance – as if painted by Picasso from a sketch by Escher.

    The building was inspired by the Hudson River span; Nervi's structure makes explicit references to the bridge's criss-cross trusses, rethinking one idiom – call it "erector set deco" – in another. From above, the roof resembles one of the bridge's towers, pushed and pulled like taffy.

    As in his better-known Palazzo dello Sport in Rome, Nervi revels in structural predetermination – the tracery of his vaults is as inevitable as the ribs of a wood canoe – and in the plasticity of ferro-concrete (his movable forms were made of the same material as the finished building).

    The Port Authority (which attributes the building to "John M. Kyle, chief engineer, and Pier Luigi Nervi, consulting engineer" on a plaque in front) has, of course, tinkered with the building over the years. Recent changes to the retail/ticketing concourse (below the bus platform) include materials that would have been an anathema to Nervi. A Port Authority spokesman said the PA has spent $14 million on capital improvements to the terminal since 1999, and that it “remains open to development opportunities at the site.” For now, the building retains its power to inspire. The columns supporting the terminal roof are triumphant – their tapering forms and striated surface suggest sequoias, yet without the slightest hint of kitsch. Above, concrete is rendered nearly weightless. The building is on par with Saarinen's TWA terminal at Kennedy Airport, another reinforced concrete masterpiece that seems ready to leave the ground. But unlike Saarinen's building, which has achieved iconic status, Nervi's is under-appreciated. It has something to do with location, but a lot to do with the fact that taking a bus to New Jersey (rather than, say, a plane to Paris) is something most New Yorkers prefer to do with eyes wide shut.

    Fred Bernstein, an Oculus contributing editor, studied architecture at Princeton University, and has written about design for more than 15 years. He also contributes to the New York Times, Metropolitan Home, and Blueprint.

    © 2004 ArchNewsNow.com

  6. #6

  7. #7

    Default Renovation Deal for Bus Station at Bridge

    Renovation Deal for Bus Station at Bridge

    By WILLIAM NEUMAN
    Published: October 1, 2008

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has worked out a deal for a $152 million renovation of the George Washington Bridge Bus Station that will increase fourfold the amount of retail space in the Upper Manhattan terminal. The authority said on Wednesday that it expected the deal to go ahead despite the economic turmoil on Wall Street and the downturn in the real estate market.

    Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
    A plan would expand retail space fourfold at the George Washington Bridge Bus Station.

    The Port Authority has spent two years negotiating with the developer, a joint venture of Acadia Realty Trust and P. A. Associates, to reach a preliminary agreement that is to be voted on by the authority’s board on Thursday.

    “We’re hopeful that within the next year or so, things will calm down a bit and they’ll be able to proceed with the financing,” said Michael B. Francois, the chief of real estate and development for the authority. “We continue to ask them, ‘Are you still good with this because of the economy?’ And they’re very comfortable.”

    Under the terms, the developer will pay the authority $1 million once the deal is approved. The two sides will then have about 18 months to complete plans for the site and a leasing agreement. Plans call for a 49-year lease with a minimum rent over that time of $53 million.

    The developer has agreed to spend $102 million to renovate the station and increase the retail space to 120,000 square feet, from 30,000 square feet. In addition, the Port Authority has agreed to spend $49.5 million to renovate the station’s bus facilities.

    The station now has about a dozen tenants, Mr. Francois said, including an Off-Track Betting parlor, a credit union and newsstands. Those tenants will have to move out to make way for the renovation. “We’re looking to transform that into more of a Class A retail space, with national anchor tenants that can better serve the needs of the community,” he said.

    Kenneth F. Bernstein, the chief executive of Acadia, could not be reached for comment on Wednesday.

    The project will also increase the number of buses that can use the site. The authority’s chairman, Anthony R. Coscia, said in a statement that enlarging the capacity of the bus station would help ease congestion on the Hudson River crossings.

    The station opened in 1963 and received an award that year for its use of concrete in construction, according to the authority’s Web site. It was designed by the Italian architect Pier Luigi Nervi. It sits on both sides of Broadway between 178th and 179th Streets, near the entrance to the George Washington Bridge.

    About 20,000 people a day get on and off buses there, Mr. Francois said. It is a hub for New Jersey Transit and for buses from Rockland and Orange Counties, Atlantic City and the airports.

    The renovation is different from a larger project planned for the Port Authority Bus Terminal on Eighth Avenue in Midtown.

    In November, the authority announced plans for a development team that includes Vornado Realty Trust to erect an office tower atop that terminal. But in July, the authority said it was extending by up to a year the time needed to complete negotiations with Vornado.

    “All real estate deals are difficult today,” Mr. Francois said. “Vornado has not expressed any unwillingness to proceed. Obviously they’re as
    concerned about the financing as anybody else, and since it does include a 1.3 million-square-foot office building, their ability to get financing will be tied to the credit markets. We’re a little ways down the road on that.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/02/ny...l?ref=nyregion

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    national anchor tenants
    Banks? Starbucks?

  9. #9

    Default

    I forgot this terminal even existed.

  10. #10

    Default

    I just wish they would finish something...anything, before they
    announced another project

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    The station now has about a dozen tenants, Mr. Francois said, including an Off-Track Betting parlor, a credit union and newsstands. Those tenants will have to move out to make way for the renovation. “We’re looking to transform that into more of a Class A retail space, with national anchor tenants that can better serve the needs of the community,” he said.
    What? Those businesses don't serve the community's needs? Then why are they there?

  12. #12
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    It's just another way of saying they want tenants that will pay higher rents.

  13. #13

    Default

    ^ I bet all three businesses mentioned make good money and therefore pay decent rent.

    When I was there, the OTB place looked like there was a gold rush going on; newsstands do well and are necessary wherever people are about to take public transport; and a credit union is ... well ... a bank.

    What they're really saying is that they want to gentrify this place and turn it into a mall full of chain stores now that the yuppies are moving in.

    But that's not exactly serving the existing community, which is mostly hispanic; it's serving the community-to-be, which they think is yuppies.

    Now that the economy has tanked, they might want to rethink their gambit.

  14. #14
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    As someone who uses this terminal from time to time I really don't see the need for OTB to be the major tenant there, but everything else is fine. There's a barber shop that absolutely must stay. I always thought a local Dominican eatery would be perfect there. It needs food other than what you get at a newsstand.

  15. #15

    Default Change and Outrage at the Bus Station That Time Forgot

    Washington Heights Journal

    Change and Outrage at the Bus Station That Time Forgot

    Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times
    The George Washington Bridge Bus Station will undergo a $152 million renovation, but not everyone is happy about it.

    By MANNY FERNANDEZ
    Published: October 5, 2008

    The old men stood inside the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on Saturday morning, waiting. They waited not for a bus but, in a sense, a horse. The Off-Track Betting parlor was opening in about an hour.

    Hiroko Masuike for The New York Times
    The station now has about a dozen businesses that will be forced out.

    Joseph Sanchez, 71, sat in the bus station’s barbershop, reading the paper. He waited, too, though not for a haircut or a bus but for the OTB as well. “You lose,” shrugged Mr. Sanchez, a retired carpenter at a now-shuttered elevator company. “You cannot win.”

    The bus station, in the Washington Heights neighborhood in northern Manhattan, is the kind of place that people forget is a bus station. Waiting for a bus, you could get a haircut at the three-chair barbershop, buy a candy bar at one of several newsstands, take out a loan at the Neighborhood Trust Federal Credit Union, get a new pair of eyeglasses at the optometrist or get your teeth cleaned at the dental offices of Howard Bloom and Steve Kaufman.

    Sitting on one of the metal benches outside the optometrist’s office, watching the well-fed pigeons that sneak in and wobble or fly around, listening to the rapid-fire Spanish of neighborhood old-timers killing time on the benches with you: such is the drowsy life at Manhattan’s other bus terminal.

    In any other city, the station — about five million people on 300,000 buses passed through it last year — would be a thriving transit hub. But it has never escaped the shadow of the Port Authority Bus Terminal, the world’s busiest, about eight miles south in Midtown. And so the George Washington Bridge station at Broadway and West 178th Street, a sprawling structure with triangular, concrete wings lining the roof, has become an overlooked spot on the New York grid.

    The three-level bus station opened in 1963, and it shows: Anyone who wonders where all the pay phones in New York City have gone should wonder no more.

    The main concourse swelters in the summertime because there is no buildingwide air-conditioning. Ceiling tiles in the men’s room are missing, and, outside of the horse races, its primary economic engines appear to be lottery tickets and 95-cent coffee.

    Washington Heights residents have been frequenting this unpolished site for decades, taking an occasional bus to New Jersey, but mostly sitting, socializing, shopping, sleeping. Mr. Sanchez has been a bus station and OTB regular for 20 years. “Passing the time, you know what I mean?” he said.

    Yet change is soon coming to this unchanged place.

    The station will undergo a $152 million renovation in a deal approved on Thursday by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey’s board of commissioners.

    The renovation will expand the retail space and increase the number of buses that can use the station. As part of the deal, the station’s current tenants will be forced to move out.

    The station has about a dozen tenants, and owners and workers at some of the businesses on Saturday expressed uncertainty and frustration over the planned renovation.

    No one was sure how long they would be able to stay open. Some were skeptical that the renovation would become a reality, saying that the Port Authority had been talking about overhauling the building for years, to no avail. Others said they were angry at the Port Authority for what they called its failure to include them in the redevelopment and its failure to keep them informed of the plans.

    “They just want to get rid of us, all the small guys,” said one business owner who asked that his name not be used, for fear of retribution. “They never did the right thing for the building. They’ve really taken care of this building as a stepchild.”

    Altagracia Guzman, 78, passes through every day. Ms. Guzman, who has lived in Washington Heights for four decades, was one of the first customers at the credit union. The eyeglasses she wears, she said proudly, were made at the optometrist.

    “This is like a family place,” she said, adding that she was angry that the small businesses were being forced out. “It’s not fair. I repeat it in front of the president of the United States: It’s not fair.”

    The station, connected to the George Washington Bridge by ramps, is a point of arrival and departure for commuters from northern New Jersey and Rockland County, Atlantic City gamblers and city children bound for summer camp in upstate New York. It replaced several bus loading areas when it opened in 1963, but its popularity waned with the expansion of the Port Authority Bus Terminal in the early 1980s.

    Homeless people congregated at the station in the middle of the night in the 1980s, giving the bus station a seedy aura that has never quite lifted. It remains the kind of place that needs to make it clear, in a long list of rules posted on the walls at the entrances, that bathing, shaving and spitting are not allowed, and neither are urinating and defecating anywhere “other than a urinal or toilet.”

    In recent years, the Port Authority made a number of improvements, renovating bathrooms and installing new windows, lighting and seats. The authority had even started playing classical music throughout the station. But plans to build a 12-screen, 2,800-seat movie theater on top of the roof of the station in 1999 fell through.

    There are attractions, or items that come close to that. Along one wall is a strange sight for a bus station: a maritime exhibit, featuring handwritten notes by an ocean liner historian and a black-and-white picture of the Queen Elizabeth docking in New York City in 1958. There is a bust of O. H. Ammann, the designer of the George Washington Bridge, but no prominent display honoring Pier Luigi Nervi, the man who designed the station.

    Mr. Nervi, an Italian engineer and architect known for his dramatic use of reinforced concrete, helped design Italy’s first skyscraper, the Pirelli Building in Milan.

    Every few minutes on Saturday, not far from Mr. Ammann’s frozen gaze, a loud clatter of voices filled the main concourse. The men watching the races at the OTB yelled and cheered and cursed. All was quiet, meanwhile, outside the office of Drs. Kaufman and Bloom.

    The dentist office opened in 1973. Dr. Kaufman arrived in 1979 and Dr. Bloom in 1984. The two dentists see about 100 patients a week. They do not have to travel far to see their handiwork. Some of their patients are toll collectors on the bridge.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/ny...1&ref=nyregion

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company
    Last edited by brianac; October 5th, 2008 at 05:06 AM.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: March 10th, 2015, 05:10 AM
  2. Manhattan Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 61
    Last Post: April 28th, 2014, 08:35 AM
  3. Triborough Bridge
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: August 22nd, 2011, 10:35 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 26th, 2011, 04:09 AM
  5. The gantry of the float bridge of New York Central Railroad
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: March 21st, 2011, 04:16 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software