Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Brooklyn Questions

  1. #1

    Default Brooklyn Questions

    Is Brooklyn as easy to get around in as Manhattan, I mean does it have all th e taxis and subway stops? Also does it have as many cool neighborhoods?

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default Re: Brooklyn Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by fall guy
    Is Brooklyn as easy to get around in as Manhattan, I mean does it have all th e taxis and subway stops? Also does it have as many cool neighborhoods?

    Thanks
    Yes and no.

    It's a huge borough (I believe, the borough itself is the fifth largest city in the country). If by "cool neighborhoods" you mean interesting shops, restaurants, bars then you'll find areas like Williamsburg, Smith Street in Cobble Hill/Boreum Hill, Dumbo, Fort Greene, Red Hook and others comparable to "cool neighborhoods" of Manhattan. And they may even offer advantages over Manhattan: they're more affordable in general and if you want to hang with a creative crowd, many struggling artists in this city have been driven from Manhattan by the prices and have since made their homes in these hoods and developed very interesting arts scene.

    The near spots like Williamsburg & Heights and others can offer very good subway service. I live in the Heights and can beat many of my UES & UWS friends to downtown venues by both rail & cab. I also can find cabs very quickly in my hood, but cabs are less available further out (but car services are plentiful and respond quickly).

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Brooklyn Questions

    [quote="Clarknt67"]
    Quote Originally Posted by fall guy
    It's a huge borough (I believe, the borough itself is the fifth largest city in the country).
    In 1990, the U.S. decennial census counted Brooklyn's population at 2,300,660, the most populous New York City borough. If considered an independent city, the borough would rank as the fourth largest in the United States after the rest of New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. It has been estimated that one out of every seven people in the nation was either born in Brooklyn, lived there at some time in their lives, or had relatives who had lived there.

    After losing population for most of the 1990s, Brooklyn grew by more than 2,000 people between mid-1997 and mid-1998 to total almost 2.3 million people. About 30 percent of all New Yorkers now live in Brooklyn, making it the most populous of the five boroughs. In 1998, the large domestic out-migration of over 52,000 people was tempered by a significant international in-migration of almost 34,000. Taken together with the number of births, 40,000, double the number of deaths, Brooklyn's population rose.


    ---Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fall guy
    With the Nets, the renovation of downtown, williamsburg, the Atlantic yards,etc, etc. Will Brooklyn still feel like Brookyln or a Manhattan knockoff?

  5. #5
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    Brooklyn will always be Brooklyn. To present an urban-forest metaphor, Brooklyn's Downtown plan will stand to give it a small grove of skyscrapers compared to Manhattan's dense thicket. Every great city should have its own bohemian enclave, as well as its own sports team. Gentrification happens, albeit often at the expense of the neighborhood's original denizens. BAM caters to a different audience and has a different vibe than Lincoln Center, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art is not as highbrow as the Met. And Brooklynites will always be Brooklynites. This question is similar to asking if Jersey City is becoming more like Manhattan: we're copied often but never bettered.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TLOZ Link5
    we're copied often but never bettered.
    Amen to that!

  7. #7

    Default

    Brooklyn has been better than Manhattan for quite a while now. Everybody is moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Regular people got priced out of Manhattan. Average apartment is more than $1 million. Manhattan's loss is Brooklyn's gain. Manhattan will be exclusively for rich people very soon if it isn't already. Brooklyn is getting richer and growing, but with the Downtown redevelopment the Coney Island development corporation and more people than any other borough its definitely the future of this city.

  8. #8

    Default

    Coney Island Development Corporation

    Public Meeting Announcement


    The Coney Island Development Corporation will hold a Public Meeting to solicit input and ideas for the Strategic Development Plan now underway for Coney Island. Please join us to offer your ideas for the future and to provide feedback on work completed to date assessing existing conditions within and around Coney Island.



    July 28, 2004

    6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

    Coney Island Hospital

    2601 Ocean Parkway, 2nd Floor



    For more information about the Coney Island Development Corporation, please visit our website at www.thecidc.org or call (212) 312 4233.



    ---------------------------------------------
    The Coney Island Development Corporation was formed in September 2003 by the Mayor, the City Council and Brooklyn Borough President. The 13-member Board of the CIDC includes City officials, local and Brooklyn-wide business and community leaders. It is charged with spearheading and implementing a comprehensive planning process for Coney Island and creating a coordinated economic development strategy for the area.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Brooklyn Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by ManhattanKnight

    In 1990, the U.S. decennial census counted Brooklyn's population at 2,300,660, the most populous New York City borough. If considered an independent city, the borough would rank as the fourth largest in the United States after the rest of New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. It has been estimated that one out of every seven people in the nation was either born in Brooklyn, lived there at some time in their lives, or had relatives who had lived there.

    After losing population for most of the 1990s, Brooklyn grew by more than 2,000 people between mid-1997 and mid-1998 to total almost 2.3 million people. About 30 percent of all New Yorkers now live in Brooklyn, making it the most populous of the five boroughs. In 1998, the large domestic out-migration of over 52,000 people was tempered by a significant international in-migration of almost 34,000. Taken together with the number of births, 40,000, double the number of deaths, Brooklyn's population rose.


    ---Brooklyn Economic Development Corporation
    Wow! 1 in 7 Americans was born or lived in Brooklyn. That is so interesting. Speaking of that, I have met people from Brooklyn. Brooklyn is different from other New York boroughs.

Similar Threads

  1. Billions for Brooklyn—No Questions Asked
    By sniperwolf in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: February 14th, 2007, 01:03 AM
  2. Rent Control Questions
    By tone99loc in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: December 7th, 2005, 10:39 PM
  3. Woodmere Questions
    By microserf in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: April 4th, 2005, 03:11 AM
  4. Affordable Housing Questions
    By Ocman in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 16th, 2004, 12:59 PM
  5. How do you evaluate a co-op? - Questions about Co-op purchas
    By ddoriann in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 3rd, 2003, 10:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software