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Thread: ThreeTen East 53 - 310 East 53rd Street - UES - Condo - by SLCE

  1. #31
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    I agree completely MidtownGuy. I too enjoy how well tended tenement buildings with nice restaurants or stores on the bottom really liven a neighborhood. It generates a great street ambiance which really isn't seen as much with a lot of the gigantic new residential buildings that are springing up. Some of it has to do with the extremely high rents that new buildings are asking for for their streetlevel retail space. An example is a new building on 51st and 1st Avenue which replaced a few one story restaurants and retails stores on 1st avenue. The new building is a 30 story relatively nice looking building but it really destroyed the street ambiance with it having its retail space sit empty for the past few years. With new buildings springing up are we going to see the end of nice small mom and pop stores that can't afford the insane rents that new condos are asking? Also in 50 years time are we going to see no more 3-5 story tenements along 1st and second avenue? I think that this would be a great loss to the City and I think the City should provide incentives to developers who gut the existing tenements where they plan on building and use the tenement facade as the new building's base to at least keep some of the quaint ambiance which has been associated with second avenue.

    I know that this would probably never happen but one can dream eh?

  2. #32

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    What makes those neigborhoods desirable , what makes them quintessentialy "New York" is that they are composed of small walk-ups. Small walk-ups and apartment buildings faced in stone and brick. A few glitzy towers can be tolerable... but when it becomes a sea of them, the neighborhood loses the charachter that made it desirable in the first place.

    These neighborhoods need strict protection... laws that govern the size, shape, and materials of what is built there.

  3. #33
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Directly across the street, there is another row of those small buildings that look like they are going to be torn down. Does anyone know what is planned to go up there?

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    What makes those neigborhoods desirable , what makes them quintessentialy "New York" is that they are composed of small walk-ups. Small walk-ups and apartment buildings faced in stone and brick. A few glitzy towers can be tolerable... but when it becomes a sea of them, the neighborhood loses the charachter that made it desirable in the first place.

    These neighborhoods need strict protection... laws that govern the size, shape, and materials of what is built there.
    Midtown isn't desirable because of walk-up tenements; it's desirable because of huge office and reisidential towers.

    Also, tenements don't necessarily give a neighborhood character. I can think of plenty of boring, characterless tenement neighborhoods throughout the City, and I can think of plenty of interesting high rise neighborhoods.

    There is no danger of losing tenement neighborhoods; the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens are overwhelmingly composed of walk-ups and small apartment buildings. Anywhere in Manhattan, developers should be allowed to replace tenements with elevator buildings.

  5. #35

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    Notice that I didn´t use the word "tenement" in my post, because it can mean " poorly maintained , run down buildings" I did say "small walk ups".

    And they certainly DO contribute to making make mid-town a desirable place to live: Turtle bay, Sutton Place, Beekman Place, Murry Hill...

    Just look at the promotional material for so many of these high-rise block-busting buildings: why do they almost always show photos of the nearby "charming" low-rise blocks as a plus?

    [QUOTE] " Anywhere in Manhattan, developers should be allowed to replace tenements with elevator buildings".

    Well there goes Greenwhich Village... The Upper West Side, The Upper east Side...

    Lovely.

  6. #36

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    I don't get it. None of those neighborhood have many tenements. The Upper East Side is mostly postwar elevator buildings. The Upper West Side is mostly prewar elevator buildings and some brownstones. Greenwich Village is a nice mix of elevator buildings, converted lofts, brownstones, etc. There are very few tenements in any of these neighborhoods.

    In Manhattan, tenements are concentrated in the Lower East Side, Clinton, East Harlem and parts of Washington Heights and Inwood

  7. #37

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    *sigh* You are mis-quoting me.

    I will repeat: No where in my post do I refer to "tenements". See above. Reread.

    I said "small walk ups". And so that would include brownstones.

    You say mid town is desirable "...because of huge office and residential towers"

    I say that small walk-ups, "contribute to making make mid-town a desirable place to live". As in "Turtle bay, Sutton Place, Beekman Place, Murry Hill..."

    Now however: as far tenements go, they do contribute to the ambience of certain neighborhoods like the East and West Village and Clinton.

    Fortunately, few New Yorkers today feel that, "Anywhere in Manhattan, developers should be allowed to replace tenements with elevator buildings".

  8. #38

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    Um, no. Brownstones aren't walkups. Tenements are walkups. There are no brownstones on Second Avenue. All the older buildings on Second Avenue are tenements. Brownstones are only on Manhattan side streets.

    I have no idea how you claim to make sweeping generalizations about New Yorkers' views towards tenements. I would assume there is a pretty broad spectrum of opinions. If you think a purely tenement neighborhood is ideal, there are plenty of options in the Outer Boroughs.

    It is silly to live in Manhattan and then complain about developers demolishing tenements in favor of elevator apartment buildings. If you detest tall buildings, it obviously makes no sense to live in Manhattan. I'm not going to move to Alaska and then complain about the cold.

  9. #39

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    Going back to my original post in response to Midtown Guy and Macreator about this part (Tutle Bay) of Manhattan:

    "A few glitzy towers can be tolerable... but when it becomes a sea of them, the neighborhood loses the charachter that made it desirable in the first place."

    These neighborhoods need strict protection... laws that govern the size, shape, and materials of what is built there."

    That´s the way I feel Shwartz.

    Perhaps you´ll like the new building at 310 East 53rd. Fine. Who knows. But to my eyes, looking at the rendering, I see the base of this building looking like a correctional facility or hospital. Not a positive edition to this streetscape.

  10. #40
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    It's distressing seeing how none of the hi-rises in turtle bay have a bar in them. I realize that some may view this as a good thing, however a lot of the charm in this neighborhood does come from the fact that there is no shortage on places to go.

    I do feel that protecting the tenements is overreacting to the problem however. Progress states that hi-rises will be built, and to block that will only serve to reduce the potential earnings of the city in terms of taxes. I think a better solution would be some sort of tax structure for the buildings requiring them to have pedestrian access from the avenues to storefronts, and a requirement that at least 1 of those storefronts house an establishment that serves food. This isn't fully thought out, so i'm sure there's more holes to my argument than swiss cheese, but I just wanted to think out loud here.

  11. #41
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos
    It's distressing seeing how none of the hi-rises in turtle bay have a bar in them. I realize that some may view this as a good thing, however a lot of the charm in this neighborhood does come from the fact that there is no shortage on places to go.
    I very much agree with what you have to say Deimos.

    Today I was walking by the 310 E. 53rd site on Second Avenue and found that at only around 1 in the afternoon the area was jumping with activity notably from a bar right next to the 310 site where a second story balcony provides bargoers the chance to enjoy a beer and enjoy the sunshine.

    Across the street and diagnonal from this bar there are countless others, many with outdoor tables that truly enlivens the area. At night I love to find Second avenue in the 50's alive with the sounds of entertainment and people. I think you're right, bars and restaurants really help to keep an area active and interesting and unfortunately as you noted with many new buildings the only tenants that can pay the insanely high rents being asked by new buildings are chains like Duane Reade or CVS, not the corner bars or restaurants that make a neighborhood attractive.

  12. #42
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Passed by the site today. The site is now above streetlevel with one floor already peaking its head. I can't wait to see this baby rise, the site was alive with activity today and over the weekend.

    Here's a shot I took with my cellphone (sorry for the poor image quality):


  13. #43

    Default ThreeTen East 53

    ThreeTen East 53
    300-310 East 53rd Street/992 Second Avenue
    30 stories 328 feet (DOB)
    SLCE Architects
    Dev-Macklowe Properties
    Residential Condominium
    88 units 210,702 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2006




    Gilsanz Murray Steficek
    http://www.gmsllp.com/

    300 East 53rd Street
    New York, NY
    New Construction – Façade Consulting

    GMS was retained by the Owner of this new condominium apartment project on Manhattan’s Upper East Side to perform comprehensive façade consulting services. These services include Energy Code Compliance studies as well as wind pressure analysis.

    SLCE Architects, Architect
    The Macklowe Organization, Owner


    Check out construction progress at the building's website.
    http://www.threetencondo.com/

    Last edited by Derek2k3; May 28th, 2005 at 04:44 PM.

  14. #44

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    It is no longer a nice glass building.

  15. #45

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    How blunt and dull.

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