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Thread: New Yankee Stadium - by HOK Sport

  1. #46
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by H-man
    they need to come out with a model or renderings im growing impatient, Yankees 2005 world champions
    Well maybe you should look up on the same page you are asking from. I see a model and a rendering there.

  2. #47

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    no the first one is just showing where it will be and what will happen to the current stadium and the model is the old plan from 2001 which they have scrapped

  3. #48

  4. #49

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    It's back to the future for Yanks
    Bombers' new digs will look like scene from Ruth's heyday



    By T.J. QUINN

    From the outside, it'll be 1923 again.

    Limestone walls rising like a fortress, standing sentinel in refurbished parkland. It's the view Babe Ruth had when he went to work in the house they built for him.

    On the inside, a mix of modernity and antiquity has officials from City Hall, Albany and the Bronx gushing: the old frieze hanging from the roof like copper lace, bullpens back in the outfield where they used to be, but with open concourses (with six times the space for concession sales) and sight lines to the field from almost anywhere in the park.

    This is the new Yankee Stadium, almost ready for prime time, all but signed, sealed and to be delivered by Opening Day 2009.


    Lawyers for the city, state and the team are completing a "memorandum of understanding," sources told the Daily News, and an announcement is expected around May 1.

    As of now, the new stadium is designed to seat 50,800, less than the current capacity of 57,478, but with 50 to 60 luxury suites.

    It will be located just north of the existing stadium, between 161st and 164th Sts. and between Jerome and River Aves.

    The stadium itself, funded entirely by the team, will run about $800 million, while the total project will cost about $1.1 billion with the city and the state providing the extra $300 million for a new Metro-North station, parkland along the now decrepit waterfront and better parking facilities around the stadium.

    Yankee President Randy Levine and city and state officials would not comment directly about the plans or the pending agreement, but confirmed they are in the final stages.

    "We're working very closely with the city and the state and trying to finalize our current plan," Levine said. "We expect to announce it in the near future, and we hope to break ground in 2006 and be ready to play in 2009."

    Officials familiar with the plans gave The News an exclusive preview of the designs for the new park, which includes all the amenities of a state of the art shopping mall:

    The stadium will be comprised of two separate structures: one, the exterior wall, constructed to replicate the original Yankee Stadium, built in 1923, and the other the interior stadium itself, rising over the top of the exterior. From the outside the structures will look like one building, almost identical in materials and design to the original stadium. There will be a "great hall" between the exterior wall and the interior structure, featuring five to six times more retail square footage than the current stadium.

    The signature frieze, the lattice work that once rimmed the original stadium roof and was recreated in the outfield of the current stadium, will be added to the new stadium's roof. The frieze (commonly but incorrectly known as "the facade") was painted white during the 1960s, as it now appears above the outfield. But the new stadium will return to the original copper.

    The city will provide $50 million worth of infrastructure for the new stadium. But the city and state, depending on the agreement, will build and control all 11,000 parking spaces in the area, a cash cow for taxpayers that one consultant told the Yankees was "too generous," a source said.
    Perhaps best of all for the parties involved, there is no significant opposition to the project.

    "We expect this project to be one that is supported by all," Levine said.

  5. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYguy






    It's back to the future for Yanks
    Bombers' new digs will look like scene from Ruth's heyday

    DAILY NEWS

    Retro-Stadium gets standing O

    BY RICK HARRISON and DON SINGLETON


    The Yankees' proposal for a brand-new old-fashioned stadium in the Bronx, revealed exclusively in yesterday's Daily News, appeared to hit a grand slam with New York fans.

    While a few Yankee rooters interviewed by News reporters voiced minor concerns about the plan - the likelihood of higher ticket prices, for one - most said they look forward to watching the Bombers from new seats.

    "They need a new stadium to keep up with everyone else," said Chris Quayle, 33, of Dover, N.J., who was wearing a Yankees cap as he stood with his girlfriend, Tonya Giessler, 34, outside Yankee Clubhouse on Fifth Ave. near 37th St.

    "Even Boston redid their stadium to have a playground over the Green Monster," Quayle said. And it's not just a matter of keeping up with the Joneses, he added. The current Stadium "is starting to fall apart a little bit."

    Quayle, who works for Viacom, peppered his conversation with references to Giessler's baseball leanings - while attending Northeastern University in Boston, she caught the Red Sox virus.

    The proposed new Stadium "looks good, has that old-time look," said Ralph Taveras, 36, of Brooklyn, a Metro-North police officer passing through Grand Central Terminal.

    "Other stadiums look so cold because they're so modern. The Yankees are bringing back the old-time stadium. I think it's time for something new, [but] if they lower the capacity they will probably have to raise the ticket prices."

    "I think it's great," said construction contractor Michael Sheridan, 52, of Manhattan, who was standing nearby. "I like all the old-style ballparks that are being built, like Camden Yards [in Baltimore] and Jacobs Field [in Cleveland]."

    Sheridan says he attends about 35 Yankees home games every baseball season, and he looks forward to the prospect of a new Stadium in the Bronx.

    "I'd like to go just to see it," he said. "The old Stadium is sort of falling apart."

    Centra Breen, 25, a Queens housekeeper, said she didn't like the idea that the new stadium will seat fewer people than the current one - the capacity will be 50,800, down from the current 57,478, but with the addition of 50 to 60 luxury suites.

    "I don't like the fact that they're going to change it to less people," Breen said. "It's nice it's so modern, [but] it looks like the hard-core fans will miss the old one."

    And then there is that other group of New York baseball fans, the ones whose attention is focused on Flushing Meadows in Queens.

    "Unfortunately, the Mets are second fiddle once again," said Shane Powers, 28, of the upper East Side, who was sitting with four other Mets fans in Annie Moore's Bar at Vanderbilt Ave. and E. 44th St.

    "It's time for the Mets ownership to step it up."



    Chris Quayle is happy with Yanks plans.

  6. #51

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    NY POST

    YANKS SHOW GREEN THUMB




    By BILL SANDERSON and STEFAN C. FRIEDMAN


    April 17, 2005 -- The Yankees are proposing to replace Bronx parkland that would be taken up by a new stadium with public playing fields and tennis courts, according to architectural drawings described to The Post.

    The $800 million, 50,000-seat stadium would go up across East 162nd Street from the House that Ruth Built, taking over a decrepit soccer field and some tennis courts in Macombs Dam and Mullaly parks. Its playing field would bear the same dimensions and its foul lines face in the same direction as the current field.

    The Yankees are suggesting that a public track and soccer field be built west of the current stadium, on what's now a parking lot, and that tennis courts be constructed just to the north. There would also be new public baseball fields.

    A walkway would lead north from a new ferry terminal and Metro-North station on the Harlem River, past the old stadium and across East 162nd Street, to the new stadium's grand entrance, near home plate.


    The old stadium's facade would stay up, but most of its stands would be torn down, as would be those parts of the facade furthest from home.

    The Yankees expect the improvements to cost $60 million to $80 million and to be funded by the city.

    As for the inside of the new stadium, sight lines would be set so the playing field would be visible from concession stands.

    The proposal, however, differs widely from one pitched by Borough President Adolfo Carrion last October in that it doesn't include a host of projects pushed by the beep.

    Carrion wants to transform the old stadium into an open-air Yankee hall-of-fame museum and to build a high school for sports medicine south of the ballpark.

    "We're the host community to the Bronx Bombers, but we've not benefited from the presence here in a way that we ought to," he said. "We're going to be very careful to try to create a master plan that benefits the community."

    But he stated confidently that his office and the Yankees would reach a compromise agreement within months.

    Meanwhile, Rep. Charles Rangel came out in favor of a new stadium, saying, "I'm a lifelong Yankees fan, so I really look forward to it."

  7. #52

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    GO YANKS! This new stadium is going to be awesome.

  8. #53
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    Just a technical question out of curiosity: I assume this new Yankee Stadium will be finished before the new Jets stadium, if indeed that gets built. I think it's been mentioned earlier that the most expensive stadium built to date in the US is Soldier Field in Chicago, at some 643 million dollars. That would make this new Yankee stadium the most expensive stadium ever built?

  9. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686
    Just a technical question out of curiosity: I assume this new Yankee Stadium will be finished before the new Jets stadium, if indeed that gets built. I think it's been mentioned earlier that the most expensive stadium built to date in the US is Soldier Field in Chicago, at some 643 million dollars. That would make this new Yankee stadium the most expensive stadium ever built?
    Both the Yankees and Jets have a 2009 target date, so I assume the Yankees would open first.

    The $800 million the Yankees are putting up for their stadium is the same amount the JETS were originally putting up for their stadium, before their cost went up to $1 Billion or more, and that doesn't include the city/state contribution. The JETS will also have to spend millions more for parks and access around the stadium.

    The public contribution to the JETS stadium is about $300 million for the deck, and $300 million for the roof.

    The public contribution to the new Yankee stadium is about $300 million for parks and a Metro-North station, $50 million worth of infrastructure for the new stadium, and about $80 million to handle the current stadium.

  10. #55

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    June 10, 2005
    A New Stadium (and No Debate)

    BY RICHARD SANDOMIR
    In the coming weeks, the Yankees will call a news conference to unveil plans to build a ballpark in the Bronx that they will finance without public money for construction or discourtesy to egos and agendas in the State Legislature.

    The $800 million stadium plan has been nurtured for years without the any public fulminations from the team's principal owner, George Steinbrenner, who spent time in decades past threatening to move to Manhattan or New Jersey.

    The stadium will rise on parkland that is far from the vitriolic political debate between developing the Far West Side of Manhattan and redeveloping post-Sept. 11 Lower Manhattan - a trap that has ensnared advocates of the proposed $2.2 billion Jets/Olympic stadium over the West Side rail yards.

    In many ways, the process of creating the new Yankees ballpark will be the antithesis of the Jets' project- suddenly moribund after being spurned Monday by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver in a vote of a potent state panel - which was the centerpiece of New York City's now close-to-impossible quest to be host to the 2012 Summer Games.

    The Yankees' project has no urgent deadline (like July 6, when the International Olympic Committee is to make its host city decision); no land dispute over Macomb's Dam Park and no need to build atop a concrete platform (which the Jets' plan called for); no lengthy history of endemic opposition (like Westway); no semantic tap dancing over whether it is a stadium or a convention center (which the Jets perpetuated); and no reason for Cablevision to vehemently campaign against it (as it did to the Jets' stadium).

    It's clear that the Yankees read and reacted to the trends in stadium financing against huge public subsidies that offer little in return to municipalities with better things to spend their money on. There will be about $300 million in government aid, much of it from the state to build garages, but the state will get the parking revenue.

    The Yankees' project is being led by the team president, Randy Levine, a former deputy mayor under Rudolph W. Giuliani, who briefed Albany lawmakers, including Silver, about the project on Wednesday.

    Charles Carrier, Silver's spokesman, said: "There were no indications of any problems. They're paying for the stadium, and the discussion was good."

    Levine said: "We're working very hard to pull all the final pieces together. We expect to announce in a few weeks."

    It was not long ago that the Yankees were looking to build exactly where the Jets want to be. Mario M. Cuomo, governor at the time and a former minor league ballplayer, proposed the site, and in 1993, the state unveiled a plan to build a $319 million West Side stadium. That plan went nowhere. Five years later, Giuliani waged a successful political and legal fight to block a referendum that would have let voters decide whether to use public money for a Yankees ballpark in Manhattan.

    During a City Council debate on the referendum in 1998, Andrew S. Eristoff, then a Republican representing Manhattan, sounded prescient about that project or any other sports palace. He told The New York Post, "There is not going to be a new stadium in Manhattan," then added, "The outcome here is known to all of us."

    But others sounded as if they could envision the Jets' stadium plight. Cuomo, in 1998, said that to build a stadium on the West Side, "You must convince the people of New York that it's a good idea."

    Woody Johnson, the Jets' owner, said in late 2000: "It's going to take everybody thinking it's a good idea. Republicans, Democrats, people living on the West Side and the East Side, upstate, New Jersey."

    Although some might have been persuaded, the Jets never found a consistent argument that the stadium would be a win-win proposition, then found themselves needing to react repeatedly to Cablevision's relentless news media blitz.

    For some commercials, the Jets hired their Super Bowl champion quarterback Joe Namath, and their superfan, Fireman Ed, but neither had the stature to make a broad swath of the public - let alone Silver - believe firmly in the cause of the Jets, the Olympics or an expanded Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.

    Marc Ganis, a sports business expert who consulted for the St. Louis Rams when their stadium was being built, said that the Jets' plan needed a respected, independent public face not aligned with the team to build support for the project.

    "Tom Eagleton played that role in St. Louis," Ganis said, referring to the former Missouri senator who headed a civic-business group called F.A.N.S. "He coalesced the opponents and supporters in the business and political communities. The Jets could have used someone like Daniel Patrick Moynihan, had he lived."

    Moynihan, the former senator from New York, would have faced a serpentine road to an uncertain fate. But the Yankees have chosen a path without hot coals burning their feet. Their strategy - undertaken on safer turf and developed in relative quiet, shielded by the clamor over the Jets - appears to be everything that the Jets' plan wasn't.



  11. #56

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    The public contribution to the new Yankee stadium is about $300 million for parks and a Metro-North station, $50 million worth of infrastructure for the new stadium, and about $80 million to handle the current stadium.
    So there is still $430 million in public money being spent because of the Yankee's new stadium. The Yankees are a rich organization, with the highest paid team in baseball. No shouts of corporate welfare huh.

    I think what aids this project as also the Nets stadium is the Jets Stadium is taking all the heat right now. So other projects are able to fly under the radar a bit better. I guarantee in other circumstances someone would find something to complain about.

    The other part is the Jets looking to build in Manhattan while the Yankees are in the Bronx. For those against these types of ventures, the Bronx looks a lot better in comparison to sacred Manhattan soil, or even platforms above the soil as in this case.

  12. #57

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    Also is the price of the parkland the new stadium will be built on included in the $800 million cost?

    I haven't read anything that said specifically the cost of the land.

  13. #58

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    There is no comparison between these 2 projects.

  14. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    There is no comparison between these 2 projects.
    You're right. The spinoff effects in the Bronx will be close to nill; the multiplier effects of a Manhattan stadium/convention complex would be huge. If the projects were being decided on merit, not politics, the West Side would be the unanimous priority.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teno
    So there is still $430 million in public money being spent because of the Yankee's new stadium. The Yankees are a rich organization, with the highest paid team in baseball. No shouts of corporate welfare huh.

    I think what aids this project as also the Nets stadium is the Jets Stadium is taking all the heat right now. So other projects are able to fly under the radar a bit better. I guarantee in other circumstances someone would find something to complain about.

    The other part is the Jets looking to build in Manhattan while the Yankees are in the Bronx. For those against these types of ventures, the Bronx looks a lot better in comparison to sacred Manhattan soil, or even platforms above the soil as in this case.
    Um, no corp. welfare at all. Let's see...new parks, parking garages to benefit the fans while the city gets the revenue, a new mass transit stop, etc. The old stadium will be converted for new uses that will benefit the area and the city. Where's the welfare?

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