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Thread: Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda: Grand Schemes

  1. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by TREPYE View Post
    Note to Moderators: This thread is misnomered. The title should really be:

    "Look at what we missed out on because of the modernist movement"

    In all seriousness this is what this thread should be named.
    Don't hate the Monolith, hate the game. With changing emphasis towards steel in construction, it was only a matter of time that stone and brick were abandoned aside for aesthetic purposes. Steel lends it self to boxes. It was only a matter of time before these kind of buildings fell out of style.

    Time and money. Art for art's sake doesn't exist on that scale, sorry.

  2. #92
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    This counts as a very Grand Scheme: a 1913 Paris Prize-winning proposal to extend Manhattan southward:

    Midtown becomes "uptown", downtown "midtown", etc.

  3. #93

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    Interesting but no thanks.

  4. #94

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    This was a naughty, what the hell were you thinking scheme...




    This was the plan for a new Municipal Building in the early 60's and it almost went through. It would have destroyed the Tweed Courthouse, the Surrogate's Courthouse, The Sun Building, Emigrant Bank Building, etc.

    In fact, the city only purchased the Sun Building and the Emigrant Bank Building to demolish them. Surprised they didn't finish the area off and level City Hall too.



    Emigrant Bank Building




    epicharmus


    Tweed Courthouse




    epicharmus



    Surrogate's Courthouse








    klong35


    klong35



    Sun Building (A.T. Stewart Company Store)




    epicharmus


    epicharmus
    Last edited by Derek2k3; March 17th, 2009 at 07:21 PM.

  5. #95

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    Breathtaking that anyone would even consider doing that. That's like leveling Museum Mile for some projects.

  6. #96
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    ^Gorgeous buildings in those pics. Looks like that was a Moses plan.

    Here is a proposal for a Wall St. skyscraper that would have been considered grand in its day (1920s). It dwarfs Banker's Trust. 60 Wall now occupies the same lot.:

  7. #97
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    We should count our blessings the plans for that new 1960's Municipal Building didn't go through.

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    Around 1942, land was purchased and a plan announced for "the finest airport in the world," eight times the size of LaGuardia. Idlewild, as originally envisioned by Delano & Aldrich, was rooted in the classical, but also decades ahead of its time. It had a huge central building featuring a neoclassical colonnade and flourishes and multi-story pane-less viewing windows. When the Airport Authority dissolved in the late 1940s, the Port Authority, lacking funds, went with the less ambitious plan of different terminal buildings for different carriers, as is found in today's JFK:
    Last edited by RandySavage; March 20th, 2009 at 04:50 PM.

  9. #99
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    Oh my god, that would have been the grandest airport terminal in the world.

    Even Europe wouldn't have had anything that looked like that.

  10. #100
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    A never-built proposal for one of the most prominent (from NY harbor) addresses in Manhattan:

  11. #101

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    That is one handsome tower, and it would have been a stunning capstone to an already grand Manhattan Isle.

    Lastly, Shadly, that is a particularly sorry and convenient excuse for the abandonment of traditional architecture, values and thought.

    Classicism, artisanry, and well thought-out and delicately crafted ornament has never been cheap, and consequently 'expense' remains a silly dismissal of quality architecture.

  12. #102

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    Maybe so, but the beau arts movement wasn't sustainable for it. They had a bubble in the 20's just like we had the last few years. It popped, and you started to get much more austere "modern" structures.

    People don't spend money on art when times are bad unfortunately. I think one of the failures of this era of architecture wasn't that they stopped producing art at the level they did, it was that they never translated it to a more affordable accessible platform. As a result, people with money don't spend it on adornments now.

    I don't think you can label them all philistines for it.

  13. #103
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    There is a second shortcoming.

    When you have times that do not afford such adornments, the people and the companies that produce them also cease to exist.

    So now when you want an ACTUAL brick facade (that looks more than a plain red brick and strait lintel design) You need to get highly paid "specialists".

    As for ornamentation, engravings and things like Gargoyles?

    Fuggetaboutit.

  14. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troyeth View Post
    Classicism, artisanry, and well thought-out and delicately crafted ornament has never been cheap, and consequently 'expense' remains a silly dismissal of quality architecture.
    Relatively speaking, it was cheap. I think the answer is somewhere in the middle.

    I remember an example from iron-fabrication in colonial times. Why were cut-nails being made by hand for such a long time? Because the iron-ore itself was the most expensive item. Labor was dirt cheap.

    Look at some of the modest housing on the LES. The ornamentation was off the shelf items. Today, modern materials and manufacturing techniques can offset some of the labor costs.

  15. #105

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    I've tried to find a rendering of the office building that was to replace Carnegie Hall but to no avail.

    I remember seeing sketches... as I remember it, the building was red (red... not brick-red) with a "moat" around it and a bridge leading to the entrance, somewhat like the Whitney. It was incredibly ugly.

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