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Thread: Grant's Tomb

  1. #16

    Post Historic Preservation: And WiredNY

    Any commentary will be appreciated but, this issue needs to be focused on the preservation of an Architectural Relic. But, as I said, I will post on this thread as often as I can and see what (if any) help wiredny can provide in the way of being a catalyst for change and ultimately bring about the 'much needed' restoration of this little Architectural Gem: The Pavillion At Grants Tomb. Any commentary, links, and photo contributions from other members would be greatly appreciated.



    [img=http://img90.imageshack.us/img90/4416/img0022gt5.jpg]



    [img=http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/6079/img0042kg0.jpg]

    [img=http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/2830/img0030jy5.jpg]
    Last edited by infoshare; February 25th, 2008 at 08:34 PM. Reason: Add addl, comments

  2. #17

    Default

    Urban Studies | Refurbishing

    Echoes of Gaudí in a Place That Honors Grant

    By JOSEPH HUFF-HANNON
    Published: July 20, 2008

    ON a bluff overlooking the Hudson River, a constant staccato tap echoes at Grant’s Tomb, the granite and marble mausoleum at Riverside Drive and West 122nd Street set off by classical white columns. Hard at work are half a dozen people fitted out in work goggles and armed with chisels and orange buckets of spackle. But it’s not the tomb that they are tapping away at.

    Joseph Huff-Hannon
    “It wouldn’t make sense anywhere else,” Pedro Silva says of the benches in Riverside Park.

    Their focus is an elaborate series of colorful and curvy mosaic benches that surround the monument. The 17 connected benches, erected by artists and volunteers in the 1970s in what was described as the largest public art project in the country, have fallen into disrepair.

    The exquisitely detailed works look as if they would be more at home in a fanciful public park in Barcelona, where Antoni Gaudí is the architect most associated with the city, than surrounding a presidential mausoleum. But the oddity of their appearance drew tourists to the monument at a moment when it was among the city’s least visited sites.

    Now, though, nearly half the benches are chipped, faded or worn bare. In response, more than 40 artists and volunteers have begun restoring the benches during the last two weeks, replacing damaged tiles with newly donated ones. The restoration project is being coordinated by CityArts, the nonprofit group that originally commissioned the work.

    “It’s a piece of the neighborhood,” said Pedro Silva, a 73-year-old Chilean-born artist and sculptor who oversaw the creation of the benches and whose artist son, Tony, now leads the restoration project. “It’s a very site-specific piece of art; it wouldn’t make sense anywhere else.”

    Sauntering from bench to bench the other day, Mr. Silva pointed out the finer details of the seemingly endless array of whimsical images. “There are a lot of stories here,” he said. “We don’t want to lose them.”

    One bench features an intricate sketch of a police officer giving a ticket to a cabdriver. Other images include an upside-down circus elephant, penguins and Eskimos on ice, and images from Medieval mythology, like dragons, a princess and a castle.

    Mr. Silva recalled the communal spirit that imbued the project when 2,500 New Yorkers were involved in the construction and design of the benches from 1972 to 1974. “We had graffiti artists elbow to elbow with professors from Columbia,” he said.

    One of the most popular works is what Mr. Silva calls the lovers’ bench, faded but still adorned with hearts and flowers and the voluptuous curves of a nude couple in repose. Facing the river, the bench is a favorite sunset-viewing spot for young couples.

    “The guard tells me many people make use of this bench at night,” Mr. Silva said with a smile. “It serves a purpose.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/20/ny...ml?ref=thecity

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  3. #18

    Default

    Grant's Tomb

    Wednesday, March 4th 2009, 4:00 AM

    Daily News
    Military ceremonies on the 100th anniversary of Grant’s birth, April 1922

    Daily News
    Grant in temporary vault, awaiting relocation

    Ulysses Grant settled in New York in 1879, an enormously revered man despite an unfortunate presidency that had left him broken and penniless, and at his death six years
    later he remained so beloved that Americans took up a public collection to build him the nation's largest mausoleum. The illustrious general himself had desired burial at West Point, but his strong-willed widow, Julia, insisted upon Central Park instead; as it turned out, there were ordinances prohibiting that, and in the end she had to settle for Riverside Park.

    Meanwhile, as the late Grant reposed in a temporary vault, it took fully 12 years to design and build his tomb, and what a tomb it was, a great Neoclassical thing much resembling Napoleon's, and in April 1897 a million New Yorkers and 60,000 soldiers turned out for its formal dedication on a holiday of pomp and pageantry unequaled in city history. And five years later there was yet another solemn municipal fete when Julia died and was planted alongside him, the two of them joined in everlasting rest. Mr. and Mrs. Grant's Tomb is today administered by the National Park Service, still one of America's grand monuments even if these years later relatively few visitors know much about its occupants.

    Order prints from more than 2,500,000 photos at

    www.dailynewspix.com

    http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...ants_tomb.html

    © 2009 Daily News

  4. #19

    Default Grant's Tomb

    I will stop by the tomb on my very very distant cousin Ulysess Simpson Grant while I will be in New York City. When will I have time to stop by his tomb?

  5. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by infoshare View Post
    Any commentary will be appreciated but, this issue needs to be focused on the preservation of an Architectural Relic. But, as I said, I will post on this thread as often as I can and see what (if any) help wiredny can provide in the way of being a catalyst for change and ultimately bring about the 'much needed' restoration of this little Architectural Gem: The Pavillion At Grants Tomb. Any commentary, links, and photo contributions from other members would be greatly appreciated.



    Grant Pavillion (HDR) 30 January 2011

    The Pavillion across from Grant's Tomb is nearly finished. I shot this in HDR to capture the details inside.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ennuipoet/5400972871/

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

    Lots more info on the original Overlook Pavillion HERE
    Last edited by brianac; February 24th, 2011 at 04:46 PM.

  6. #21

    Default

    Thursday, February 24, 2011

    ☞ WALK: Overlook Pavilion Awaits Its Debut











    It appears that the derelict Overlook Pavilion at Riverside Drive and 125th Street has finally been restored but still awaits a spring opening. By the end of 2010, most of the plywood out front had been removed and now only a low-level barricade sections off the romantic rendezvous spot facing the Hudson. We also noticed that there are stairwells on either side of the structure that leads to another path below (middle photos).

    Everything is roped off now but following the course on the upper level for about a block north, one will discover the other notable monument of the Amiable Child which is also the other hidden artifact of the area: LINK. It's a little out of way but this little section on the far west side is sort of a cool secret spot to traverse when one has bit of time on their hands. Check out what the pavilion looked like before in our past post: LINK


    Posted by Ulysses at 12:31 PM

    http://harlembespoke.blogspot.com/20...its-debut.html

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