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Thread: One Carnegie Hill - 215 East 96th Street - Rental - Condo - by HLW International

  1. #31

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    The Last Gasp of the Upper East Side
    Architecture


    By JAMES GARDNER
    December 19, 2005

  2. #32
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Could you post the article text?

  3. #33
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    I completely disagree with this article's criticism. I think the One Carnegie Hill looks pretty nice.

  4. #34

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    The Last Gasp of the Upper East Side
    Architecture

    By JAMES GARDNER
    December 19, 2005

    http://www.nysun.com/article/24641

    There are many bad buildings in Manhattan, but most are cynically unexceptional. What partially redeems the latter, in the eyes of those who write about them, is that they are manifestations of an urban process that is invariably more interesting than they are. That, unfortunately, is the best that can be said for 96th Street as it stretches from Central Park to the East River. How, one wonders, has it turned out so much worse than 72nd, 79th, and 86th, the Upper East Side's other major cross-streets?

    Whereas East 72nd and 79th streets are models of residential gentility, especially west of Lexington Avenue, East 86th and 96th Streets are far less inviting places. But even 86th Street is redeemed by the mesmerizing vitality of its incessant movement. From the park halfway to Lexington, it is almost as elegant as its two cousins to the south. Things start to unravel as you approach Lexington, and once you hit the avenue itself, all hell breaks loose as the street-line fractures into a thousand mid-market clothing stores and electronics outlets, and one purveyor of papaya juice.

    On 96th Street, that vitality is missing, as is the refined building stock that lends a somnolent charm to 72nd Street. There is only one truly interesting structure on this primarily residential street: the huge and rather beautiful mosque and minaret of the Islamic Cultural Center, completed in 1996 according to designs by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Facing Mecca, it is sited at an angle to the north ern side of 96th Street, and provides a welcome disruption of its monotony.

    As has often been remarked, the change that occurs between 96th and 97th streets is perhaps the most abrupt in the entire city. One represents the northernmost edge of the fabled Upper East Side, while the other is the southern boundary of Spanish Harlem. The latter, with its bodegas, row houses, and street life, has a certain run-down enchantment. By contrast, most of the building stock on 96th consists of crude highrises from the 1970s, '80s, and '90s that don't aspire to anything more than the most basic adequacy.

    Part of the reason for this is due to 96th Street's proximity to Spanish Harlem. And let us not forget that 96th Street is the point where the submerged tracks leading out of Grand Central station suddenly hit daylight. When most of the buildings you now see were being erected in the 1970s and '80s, developers hoped that by building up they could soar far above the grime and gracelessness of an essentially undesirable neighborhood. As so often happens, bad buildings engendered more bad buildings so that each subsequent generation begat high-rises as tasteless as its own.

    For years, the eastern half of 96th Street between Second and Third Avenues lay fallow.Thus it is a relief to see that a new building has been topped out on the site and is now approaching completion. One Carnegie Hill, as it is pleased to call itself, is a 42-story hulk of a building, whose red-brick cladding is very inadequately inflected with an asymmetrical outcropping of curtainwalls to the south and west. This is the work of HLW International, a large and somewhat anonymous firm that collaborated with Cesar Pelli on Brooklyn's new Federal Courthouse. The firm has also worked with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on the Random House Tower in Midtown and is responsible for the moderately accomplished Harborside Plaza 10 in Jersey City, not to mention the headquarters for the Chamber of Commerce in Kuwait City.

    As long as 96th Street remains within sight of Central Park, it can never forget that it is part of the Upper East Side; indeed, it is the district's last gasp. That explains the slightly more ambitious and interesting 21 E. 96th Street, which has just begun to command the northwest corner of Madison Avenue. This is the work of H. Thomas O'Hara, a fairly prolific local architect who works primarily in the idiom of Postmodern Contextualism. He has collaborated with Michael Graves on the rather awful Impala on First Avenue and 76th Street, as well as on 425 Fifth Avenue. Somewhat better are two contiguous buildings in SoHo, 19-35 and 55 W. Houston Street, which imitate, respectively, the cast-iron and factory aesthetics of that part of the city.

    Here on 96th Street, Mr. O'Hara has designed a 13-story brick-class building whose Anglophile limestone trim and base invoke the aristocratic vocabulary of Christopher Wren's Hampton Court. (This aesthetic, several years back, also inspired Robert Stern's much larger building, the Chatham on Third Avenue and 65th Street.) The detailing and the windows are rectilinear throughout, except for the penthouse, which is adorned with three arches. Along the avenue itself, the facade is a little too busy, almost chaotic, especially with its pointlessly recessed middle bay. But the facade on 96th Street is calmer and more dignified, such that it forms an adornment to one of the crucial corners of Manhattan.

    It is not nearly enough to redeem the rest of East 96th Street, though. In fact, I doubt that can ever be accomplished. The high-rises have gone up and they are not coming down any time soon.And there is not much room left to build anything better than what we see today. The best we can hope for is that, through partial rezoning, more commercial space will be allowed on the ground floors of these buildings. The result, surely, will never be beautiful, but it may one day achieve the allure that accrues to anything that is not quite dead.

    jgardner@nysun.com

  5. #35

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    Will someone please give Mr. Gardner a copy of 'The Elements of Style'?

    "there is only one truly interesting building...the rather beautiful mosque"
    "very inadequately inflected"
    "a large and somewhat anonymous firm"
    "the rather awful Impala on First Avenue"
    "a fairly prolific architect"

    Allow me to re-do his opening paragraph:

    >>

    There are many bad writers who purport to write architectural criticism in Manhattan, but most are cynically unexceptional. What partially redeems the former, in the eyes of those who read them, is that they are manifestations of an urban process that is invariably more interesting than they are. That, unfortunately, is the best that can be said for writers who wish that they could be like Ada Louise Huxtable or Paul Goldberger. How, one wonders, has an article for the Sun turned out so much worse than anything you could read in the Wall Street Journal or the New Yorker, New York's major publications?

  6. #36
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    Does anyone know when people will be moving into the building? I live in the neighborhood and I am curious to see the impact this building will have on the number of people using the subway at 96th Street...

    Even now, many on next station - 86th street - cannot even get into the train.

    This building will have 1000+ people, I assume. I see that it's pretty much complete.

  7. #37
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    What do you think of the way the building looks, MrSpice?

  8. #38

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    I live right by this building. Residents have started moving in and there's a full service doorman on staff. This building is in a terrific area, theres plenty of parks , one at 96th and Lex, other private parks, others at East End, and Central Park. There's some great restaurants and bars in the vicinity. And the 6 and cross town bus right there and it isnt as crowded as 86th. Its always bothered me how there's a line of luxury buildings on 96th and not even a block over are projects and run down tenements. How you can feel safe at the park at 96th and Lex and not as safe at the Park at 96th and Second, right in front of Metopolitian Hospial, world's apart from Mount Sinai. Walk two blocks south and you have unparraled wealth, two blocks north and you have destitute poverty. NYC's richest neighborhood is right next to NYC's poorest and this really bothers me.

    Oddly enough this building doesn't turn its back on the projects. In fact it rather looks like one. It even lies right up against the grass lawn of the Mosque, looking just like a tower in the park. This isn't a good thing, projects were a failed concept and are an unfortunate context. Throw in a couple rows of green glass, which are of an exceptional quality, an Asian inspired base, and you have nice elements that clash. There is no design logic to there placement and they are overwhelmed by exposed floorplates and a brick mass. They do not add to the design, they only show how bad the design is and how better it could've been.

    This building looks fine only from the sides, with sufficent glass and setbacks, and a fine height to width ratio. From the front its a hulking and ungainly mass. I would live here for the neighborhood and the relative quiet of a major transportation area. All that said I wouldn't consider living here for the horrible architecture and the fact that I would feel guilty A.) Paying double for what I could a block north and B.) Actually paying double than those that live a block north.

  9. #39

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    Why did Related - who aspires for quality architecture - not often successfully - not even try at this site ?

    You are right, it looks like a project - so I guess then, it is contextual.
    (sigh)

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby
    What do you think of the way the building looks, MrSpice?
    I am not an architect nor am I a graphic designer. I really like tall, new, luxury-looking buildings. I think this buildings looks great compare to the other buildings in the area. If it was build somewhere on the corner of 51st and 3rd, it would probably be considered ugly among all the great commercial buildings of midtown Manhattan. But here on 96th among projects, ugly hospital buildings and other mediocre-looking buildings, it looks awesome. I walk along 96th street from the subway station every day and this building certainly stands out from the rest. I wish it was taller and had balconies. Other than that, it looksd pretty damn good to me.

  11. #41
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    One Carnegie Hill on East 96th Street nearing completion





    18-MAY-06

    One Carnegie Hill, the 42-story apartment tower at 215 East 96th Street is nearing completion.

    The building has a total of 475 apartments of which 200 are cooperative units with condominium rules and the rest are rentals.

    About 85 percent of the project’s cooperative units, which start on the 23rd floor, have been sold.

    Related acquired a 99-year ground lease from the Islamic Cultural Center of New York, which is just to the west, and incorporates a 63,000-square foot community facility for the center in the new building. The community facility has its own entrance on 97th Street.

    The Related Companies have been one of the city’s most active developers in recent years, and the projects have included the twin-towered Time-Warner Center on Columbus Circle.

    While many of the projects have been rather conservative in design, they ventured to create an important gateway to East Harlem at The Monterey, a rental apartment building at 175 East 96th Street that is noted for its huge, curved corner façade at Third Avenue and its very large and handsome mid-block garden on 96th Street.

    The Monterey is directly across Third Avenue from the Islamic Cultural Center at 201 East 96th Street that was designed in 1991 by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and whose minaret was designed by Swanke Hayden Connell. The handsome mosque is oriented toward Mecca.

    One Carnegie Hill is the tallest building on East 96th Street and both the rental and condominium units share a common lobby, which is unusual.

    HLW International is the architect for the new tower and Ismael Leyva is the designer of the interiors and David Rockwell is the designer of the lobby and amenity floors.

    The building has a health club, a swimming pool, a yoga studio, a landscape terrace area for residents with barbecues, a business center, a pet space and a children’s playroom as well as a rooftop entertainment langue and sun terrace, a garage, storage space and a bicycle room. Each apartment has a Miele washer/dryer kitchens have Luca de Luna granite countertops and bathrooms have marble walls and floors.

    A one-bedroom, south-facing apartment on the 41st floor with 701 square feet is priced at $750,000 and a one-bedroom, south-facing apartment on the 31st floor with 679 square feet and a terrace of 475 square feet is priced at $900,000. A two-bedroom apartment facing south and east with 1,033 square feet on the 28th floor is priced at $1,280,000 and a two-bedroom apartment facing north and east on the 37th floor with 1,513 square feet is priced at $1,900,000. A three-bedroom apartment facing north and east with three baths and 1,704 square feet on the 41st floor is priced at $2,235,000.


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