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Thread: Jersey keeps its light-rail rolling

  1. #271
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Much needed Connection!!!

    New Pennsauken connection of Atlantic City Rail Line, River Line opens


    Paula Williamson, of Haddon Township, and her granddaughter, Brianna Costroff, 4, of Audubon, board an Atlantic City bound New Jersey Transit train at the Pennsauken Transit Center, Monday Oct. 14, 2013. Monday marked the grand opening of the center, connecting New Jersey Transit's River Line with the Atlantic City line. (Photo by Tom Scott/South Jersey Times)

    By Michelle Caffrey / South Jersey Times
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    on October 14, 2013 at 4:28 PM, updated October 14, 2013 at 5:11 PM

    PENNSAUKEN — The newest station on South Jersey’s public transportation map opened in Pennsauken on Monday, connecting the River Line light rail line to the Atlantic City Rail Line for the first time.

    Elected officials, representatives from NJ Transit and local residents celebrated the ribbon-cutting for the $40 million station on DeRousse Avenue Monday morning, hailing it as a local success with a regional impact.

    “The good, hardworking people in the surrounding community deserve this,” said Pennsauken Deputy Mayor Jack Killion.

    To the residents, the connection — funded with a mix of state and federal monies — means increased access to educational, health care and employment options, said U.S. Rep. Rob Andrews (D-1, Haddon Heights).

    “This will open up jobs and opportunities for Pennsauken and beyond,” said Andrews.

    The new connection links the Atlantic City Rail Line’s reach from 30th Street Station, in Philadelphia, to Atlantic City, and the River Line’s stretch from Camden to Trenton, where riders can connect to NJ Transit’s Northeast Corridor line to New York.

    “This is such a wonderful project to move this region forward,” said Pennsauken native Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D-3, West Deptford).

    He said plans to extend a light rail from Camden to Glassboro and connect more of Gloucester County into the public transportation infrastructure have been in the works for years, and he hopes to see a grand opening for that project in years to come.

    “I might be alive when we get it done,” Sweeney said. The project is currently in the hands of a consulting firm, which was hired to conduct an environmental study before it moves toward a public review stage. The results of the study are expected to be released next spring.

    The opening of the Pennsauken Transit Center itself is a long time coming, with NJ Transit Board Member and Chair of the American Public Transportation Association Flora Castillo recalling the groundbreaking of the center four years ago.


    Senate President Stephen Sweeney speaks at the opening ceremony at New Jersey Transit's Pennsauken Transit Center, as a RIVERLine train passes, Monday Oct. 14. Monday marked the grand opening of the center, connecting New Jersey Transit's River Line with the Atlantic City line. (Photo by Tom Scott/South Jersey Times)

    Phase One of the project started in 2009 and focused on creating the River Line portion, while phase two created the high-level rail platform for the Atlantic City Rail Line.

    “This is creating opportunities for residents to go where they need to go,” Castillo said. She also praised the station’s digitally-printed glass artwork featuring historic photos of 80 women who played a part in Pennsauken’s past.

    Done by J. Kenneth Leap, the art is inspired by the 1884 J. Dunbar Hylton poem “My Jersey Girl,” which reflects on the beauty of a local woman encountered on the water ways of Pennsauken.

    Historic photos of Pennsauken’s past club houses, homes, factories and train stations also adorn the tempered glass leading up to the platform, where the portraits of the women — including the first female postmaster Mary Ellis and the first female mayor Geri Tabako — are featured.


    To Jeffrey Marinoff, 2nd Vice Chair of NJ Transit’s South Jersey Transit Advisory Committee, the opening could not have come soon enough. Marinoff said he pushed for the Pennsauken connection back when the River Line was first built in 2004, but was told there were no funds for it.

    Pushing forward anyway, Marinoff said he convinced NJ Transit to go forward with engineering and environmental studies on the feasiblity of the station. It proved beneficial when federal funds for infrastructure projects that were “shovel ready” — with impact studies already completed — became available under President Obama’s administration, and he pushed the state to apply for them.

    “I fought for this for 10 years,” Marinoff said while standing on the platform Monday morning as a handful of riders waited for their trains. “It’s a wonderful day. It’s a dream come true.”

    Contact staff writer Michelle Caffrey at 856-686-3686 or mcaffrey@southjerseymedia.com

    http://www.nj.com/camden/index.ssf/2...pment_for.html

    NJTransit Pennsauken Transit Center Page:http://www.njtransit.com/var/var_ser...n=PennsaukenTo

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This transit center opening is great for the State of NJ! With the center's opening, ALL NJTransit rail lines, commuter rail and lightrail, are now interconnected along with PATH, PATCO, and AMTRAK lines!!! This is a huge boon for New Jersey and has linked up the entire state!!

  2. #272
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    Yet it was still botched , and took to long...a few years for a simple transfer station which needs to redo to meet ADA.

  3. #273
    Forum Veteran West Hudson's Avatar
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    I'm hoping we can get the shuttered Morris-Essex station here in Harrison reopened. It would go a long way in spurring additional redevelopment in part of the town a half-mile away from the PATH station.

  4. #274

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    About damn time! They should have done that in the first place! Are there any plans to double-track that section? The station is in a good place to encourage dense transit-oriented development around it to the North, if the city and surrounding community will cooperate.

  5. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by towerpower123 View Post
    About damn time! They should have done that in the first place! Are there any plans to double-track that section? The station is in a good place to encourage dense transit-oriented development around it to the North, if the city and surrounding community will cooperate.
    Not at this time , which is strange considering that section of single track is only 2 miles long.... They will have to clean up the soil before any development occurs in that area. But there is development in Bordentown which comes with a new station , theres infill development near Riverside , Beverly-Edgewater , Burlington and Trenton. Theres a station being proposed at Lalor Street in Trenton...that would cause redevelopment boom in a quieter part of the city with reasonable commutes to NYC / New Brunswick and Philly...

  6. #276
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 7 Line Extension to Jersey Clears Hurdle

    Resolution for N.J. extension of 7 Line clears Assembly committee but lacks steam

    By Andrew George
    November 25, 2013 at 2:20 PM

    While a resolution in support of extending New York City's 7 Line Subway to New Jersey was moved forward by an Assembly panel today, don't expect it to go anywhere anytime soon.

    Though the Assembly Transportation, Public Works and Independent Authorities Committee voted to release the resolution for further consideration, legislators said there were still too many concerns surrounding it.

    Assemblyman Thomas Giblin (D-Clifton) is the resolution's primary sponsor.

    According to the resolution, studies indicate that travel demand between Manhattan and New Jersey will increase by roughly 38 percent by 2030. The 7 Line, which is currently undergoing an extension on Manhattan's West Side, would connect New Jersey riders to the major hubs of Grand Central Station, Times Square and eventually the area near Penn Station when construction is completed.

    In New Jersey, the proposed extension would include stops in Hoboken and Secaucus and roughly account for an additional 128,000 riders per day,
    according to an April 2013 study conducted by the New York City Economic Development Corporation, which was included in the resolution.

    Committee chair and Assemblyman John Wisniewski (D-Sayreville) said that the extension is worth further consideration if only to continue looking for an alternative to the $8.7 billion Access to the Region's Core project, a trans-Hudson rail tunnel that Gov. Chris Christie nixed in 2010.

    Wisniewski said that while everything had been in place to move forward with the ARC project, Christie "chose to pull the rug out from underneath that."

    But Daniel O'Connell, a state legislative director for the United Transportation Union, testified before the committee that rather than diverting resources to extending the 7 Line, the state should instead look to support efforts "that get the biggest bang for the buck," such as the Gateway Project and viable alternatives to the ARC project.

    He said a priority should also be given over the project to exploring a one-seat ride route for NJ Transit's Raritan Valley Line, which currently requires passengers to change trains in Newark before continuing on to Manhattan.

    That's something Assemblywoman Linda Stender (D-Scotch Plains) said she could get behind, given that the Raritan Valley Line cuts through her district. Stender said legislators "have to keep the pressure on" about exploring that option.

    http://www.njbiz.com/article/2013112...ut-lacks-steam
    Last edited by JCMAN320; April 30th, 2014 at 05:16 AM.

  7. #277
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    These politicians are a joke , instead of choosing a project that benefits the entire Northeast , they choose a project that benefits a small slice of the NYC....and why not support the various NJ projects...

  8. #278
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up NJ/NY Super Bowl Transit Map

    About time the MTA recognized there is an extensive mass transit system on the other side of the Hudson River! This map is at all PATH Stations, Light Rail Stations, and NJT Commuter stations.

    ==============

    MTA designs regional Super Bowl mass transit map

    By Alex Napoliello/NJ.com
    Email the author | Follow on Twitter
    on December 11, 2013 at 9:56 AM, updated December 11, 2013 at 10:06 AM


    The MTA released a regional transit map to accommodate the influx of people during Super Bowl week. (NJ Transit)

    To accommodate the more than 400,000 people expected to flood the New York City – New Jersey area for the Super Bowl this February, the MTA designed a new, colorful transit map.

    The map brings together lines on the New York City subway, New Jersey Transit, Metro-North, PATH, Long Island Railroad and Amtrack, the MTA said. View the whole map here:http://www.njtransit.com/pdf/regiona...it_diagram.PDF

    The diagram will appear on all transit provider and Super Bowl web sites, guides, publications and mobile apps, the MTA said. It will also be made available as a pocket map distributed by the Super Bowl Host Committee.

    Super Bowl XLVIII, held at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford on Feb. 2, is being billed as the “first mass transit Super Bowl.” Attendees can get direct service to the stadium by using the “Fan Express” pre-ticked coach bus system as well as NJ Transit’s “Super Pass,” an unlimited train ticket through Super Bowl week for the cost of $51.

    The new map was designed by Yoshiki Waterhouse of Vignelli Associates, the MTA said. According to a report from Gothamist, Vignelli created the 1972 subway map that was eventually discarded.

    The MTA will also release a series of four commemorative Super Bowl-branded MetroCards, available for purchase at all MTA stations, they said.

    http://www.nj.com/super-bowl/index.s..._river_default

    =========



    http://gothamist.com/2013/12/10/2014...es_mass_tr.php
    Last edited by JCMAN320; January 31st, 2014 at 12:05 PM.

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  10. #280
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up No More Newark Transfer

    But Daniel O'Connell, a state legislative director for the United Transportation Union, testified before the committee that rather than diverting resources to extending the 7 Line, the state should instead look to support efforts "that get the biggest bang for the buck," such as the Gateway Project and viable alternatives to the ARC project.

    He said a priority should also be given over the project to exploring a one-seat ride route for NJ Transit's Raritan Valley Line, which currently requires passengers to change trains in Newark before continuing on to Manhattan.

    That's something Assemblywoman Linda Stender (D-Scotch Plains) said she could get behind, given that the Raritan Valley Line cuts through her district. Stender said legislators "have to keep the pressure on" about exploring that option.
    Historic first 'one-seat ride' on Raritan Valley Line arrives in NYC

    By Mike Frassinelli/The Star-Ledger
    Email the author | Follow on Twitter
    on March 03, 2014 at 10:33 AM, updated March 03, 2014 at 2:14 PM


    New Jersey Transit's first "one-seat ride" on the Raritan Valley Line leaves Raritan station for New York on Monday, March, 3 at 8:43am. Instead of having to leave their diesel locomotive-powered train and transfer to an electric-powered one at Newark Penn Station, riders will be able to stay on. This historic first "one-seat-ride arrives in New York at 10:09am. Monday March, 03, 2014 (Patti Sapone/The Star-Ledger)

    NEW YORK — It arrived 15 years late, but just in time for train passengers in Hunterdon, Somerset, Middlesex and Union counties.

    The historic first “one-seat ride” to New York, a dream of Raritan Valley Line passengers since at least 1999, left Raritan Station at 8:43 a.m. today.

    It was the first direct ride to the city without requiring the usual transfer at Newark Penn Station for Raritan Valley Line riders.

    Before arriving at New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan at 10:15 a.m., the locomotive carrying seven double-decker cars made stops in Somerville, Bridgewater, Bound Brook, Dunellen, Plainfield, Netherwood, Fanwood, Westfield, Garwood, Cranford, Roselle Park, Union Station, Newark Penn Station and Secaucus Junction.

    Along the way, people on the platforms recorded the moment with their cameras and smartphones.

    Normally, passengers on the line have to get off their diesel-powered train at Newark Penn Station, go down and up steps and transfer to an electric-powered train to Manhattan. It is a particularly daunting task for disabled passengers.

    Not this time.

    For this maiden voyage of one-seat ride service, a train engineer converted the system on a dual-power locomotive that is capable of operating in both diesel and electrified territory, so riders got to stay in their same seat the entire trip.

    "Attention all passengers going to New York," a conductor said as the train entered Newark Penn Station. "Stay on this train."

    "It's the first time you can do this," said Steve Thorpe of Winfield, who was on the last train that made the transfer at Jersey City between Raritan and New York in 1967, a predecessor to the Newark transfers.

    "It's a historic moment," Thorpe said. "It's going to herald a new day, where it is easier to get from places on the Raritan Valley Line to New York."

    Another transfer-free train was scheduled to leave High Bridge at 9:18 a.m.

    For now, the transfer-free rides will only be offered on weekdays during off-peak hours. Five trips will be offered to New York and five from the city during the late morning and early afternoon.

    Eventually, commuters hope to get one-seat rides on weekends and during rush hours.

    "It's a four-step process," said Somerset County Freeholder Peter Palmer, who chairs the Raritan Valley Rail Coalition. "This is step one."

    The other steps, he said, are getting evening one-seat ride trains out of New York, getting weekend service and getting rush-hour service.

    "This is a real posthumous tribute to (late Congressman) Bobby Franks, who started this whole thing 15 years ago," Palmer said before boarding the train in Raritan today. "This would have made him happy."

    Passenger Patricia Trattner of Branchburg was thrilled to learn that she had accidentally been part of a historic moment, on the first Raritan Valley Line train that took the first direct ride to New York.

    "I missed the bus on a good day," she said.

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/201...incart_m-rpt-1
    Last edited by JCMAN320; April 30th, 2014 at 05:16 AM.

  11. #281
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Bergen Wants In On HBLR

    Group wants to put the Bergen in Hudson-Bergen Light Rail

    By Mike Frassinelli/The Star-Ledger
    Email the author | Follow on Twitter
    on March 17, 2014 at 4:30 PM, updated March 17, 2014 at 9:57 PM


    It is called the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, but it still doesn't stop in Bergen County. (Star-Ledger file photo)

    It is called the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail — except the trolleys still do not enter Bergen County, 14 years after the rides began.

    A group of Bergen County elected officials and business owners who want to change that descended on Trenton today, testifying before the Senate Transportation Committee about the benefits of giving a travel alternative to residents.

    “It is time for the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail to live up to its name,” Assemblyman Gordon Johnson (D-Bergen) said.

    The latest proposal calls for extending the line north, from the current terminus at Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen to a new station 12 miles away at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center. Funding for the $900 million project has yet to be identified, but NJ Transit plans to submit an amended draft environmental impact statement in late autumn following a 45-day public comment period.

    The Bergen County officials were not only preaching to the choir, they were preaching to the pastor.

    Sen. Nicholas Sacco (D-Hudson), who chairs the Senate Transportation Committee, is one of just two people left from the original Hudson-Bergen Light Rail meeting in 1987, along with Weehawken Mayor Richard Turner.

    “Had no idea what a light rail would look like,” recalled Sacco, a longtime mayor of North Bergen. “The Disney light rail? Trolley cars? Not a clue. And most believed we would never see it.”

    He said a line was drawn where it was thought the light rail should go in Bergen County — to the Vince Lombardi Service Area off the New Jersey Turnpike in Ridgefield.

    It was agreed by local officials in Hudson County that they would stay unified because they did not want to lose the project to another area of the state that was perceived as being more organized.

    “There was a lot of discord (in Bergen County) as to where it would go,” Sacco said. "The only warning I could give people is that as long as that remains, it will never go anywhere.”

    The light rail goes from Bayonne to Jersey City to Hoboken Terminal to Weekhawken to North Bergen, all in Hudson County.

    But Bergen County now has a willing light rail station host in Englewood Hospital, which sees the benefits of having a way for outpatients and employees to easily reach the facility.

    Hospital CEO Warren Geller said the hospital would gladly share space in a proposed parking garage at the hospital with NJ Transit.

    “Today the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is incomplete, and it’s a vision unfulfilled in our eyes,” he said. “It’s 12 short miles of rail that will go a long way in giving our community the access to quality health care, as well as serving as an economic stimulus for the city of Englewood and an essential link for its future prosperity.”

    There are 24 light rail stations across 21 miles in Hudson County. About 47,500 passengers use the line each day in Hudson County, more than triple the 10,000 to 15,000 daily riders envisioned at the beginning of the project, said former Assemblywoman Rose Heck, a longtime advocate for light rail in Bergen.

    “Hopefully everyone stays focused, and we'll see this in our lifetimes,” Sacco said.

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/201..._river_default
    Last edited by JCMAN320; May 1st, 2014 at 02:47 AM.

  12. #282
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    Thumbs up ^JC Mayor Getting On Board

    Jersey City and Englewood mayors will co-chair light-rail panel to push transit line into Bergen County

    By Political Insider/The Jersey Journal
    on March 19, 2014 at 5:13 PM, updated March 19, 2014 at 7:28 PM


    NJ Transit unveils a prototype of an expanded light rail vehicle on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail that offers 50 percent more seating capacity than a standard one, on Wednesday, July 3, 2013, at the Hoboken Terminal. Reena Rose Sibayan/The Jersey Journal

    Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop is co-chairing a panel of Hudson and Bergen County mayors, along with Englewood Mayor Frank Huttle III, created to push the light-rail train line further north, Huttle announced today.

    The Mayors’ Hudson/Bergen Light Rail Commission is comprised of officials where the line runs and where officials want it extended. Others on the panel will include Mayors James Rotundo of Palisades Park, Anthony Suarez, Ridgefield, Vincent Bellucci, Jr., Fairview, Nicholas Sacco, North Bergen, Felix Roque, West New York, Brian Stack, Union City. Richard F. Turner, Weehawken, Dawn Zimmer, Hoboken, John DeSimone, Leonia, and Mark Smith, Bayonne.

    Huttle's release says: " . . . the commission will coordinate ground-up planning and consultation between the local government entities within each municipality, both counties and amongst stakeholders while providing a direct conduit to NJ Transit, the lead agency in the project. The move comes on the heels of the city’s recent adoption of a comprehensive new master plan that places a high priority on extending the light rail line through Bergen County and ending in Englewood in order to foster economic development and smart growth in one of the most densely- populated areas of the state."

    Fulop said: “We have seen the success the Light Rail has had in stimulating residential and commercial development in Jersey City and Hudson County, and know that a full expansion into Bergen County will only benefit Jersey City and add to commerce in our region. Providing more northern New Jersey residents access into Jersey City and Hudson County is good for development, job growth and small business alike. This Commission will allow mayors along the route to have a more active role in this important transit system and its future growth.”

    Englewood Hospital and Medical Center has proposed that its facility be the last stop on the line be and that there be two other stops in the city at Englewood Town Center and Route 4.


    Rail service could return to the long-dormant Northern Branch corridor. This is the original route. Line's northern terminus now would be in Englewood.
    NJ TRansit


    Northern Branch Website:
    http://www.northernbranchcorridor.com/

    http://www.nj.com/opinion/index.ssf/..._river_default

  13. #283
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up ^Hudson Light Rail Moving To Add Bergen

    Englewood mayor hopes to jump-start Bergen County light rail plan

    April 21, 2014, 3:15 PM Last updated: Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 12:33 PM
    By Karen Rouse
    Staff Writer
    The Record


    AMY NEWMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
    Linda A. Mosch of NJ Transit discussing service at Monday's meeting.


    ENGLEWOOD — Mayor Frank Huttle III hopes to jump-start a long stalled plan to bring light rail service to Bergen County by emphasizing the economic benefits a thriving light rail system can bring to the rest of the state.

    Huttle, joined by Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop, on Monday held the first meeting of the “Mayors’ Hudson/Bergen Light Rail Commission” at bergenPAC where more than a dozen officials began crafting a strategy for moving the project closer to construction.


    AMY NEWMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
    Englewood Mayor Frank Huttle III during Monday's meeting.


    The light rail system is run by NJ Transit and named Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, but it only operates in Hudson County – from Bayonne up to Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen. But Bergen County officials have long been pushing NJ Transit to extend the line further north into Bergen County. Three years ago, there appeared to be some movement on the project when a proposal called for extending the light rail to Tenafly, but strong opposition from that town in 2012 forced NJ Transit to eliminate that option and bring the proposed terminus to Englewood.

    Since then, a new proposal had emerged that would allow the line to continue on from Tonnelle Avenue to stops in Ridgefield, Palisades Park and Leonia, before ending in Englewood. Once constructed, the nine-mile stretch would take 33 minutes, said Linda Mosch, a senior director in NJ Transit’s capital planning office. New to the latest proposal is the addition of a parking garage at Englewood Hospital – the first of three proposed stops in the city — and the possibility of additional parking in downtown Englewood, Huttle said Monday.

    John C. Leon, NJ Transit’s senior director of government and community relations, told the group that NJ Transit staff is currently working on a new supplemental document to send to the Federal Transit Administration that will outline the changes. He said that document should be ready to submit to the FTA this fall, and that public hearings will likely be scheduled for the spring of 2015.

    Funding, however, has been one of the main obstacles to the project. No source of cash has been identified.

    An official from Congressman Bill Pascrell’s office told the group that the project, expected to cost nearly $1 billion, could apply for funding that would require a state match. He said the state has to have a solid plan and a commitment to contributing a 50 percent match to qualify for the federal funding program.

    Huttle said the mayors’ commission – which voted on Monday to support the project and advocate for its completion – is just the beginning of creating a unified voice that he hopes will strengthen the state’s position, and encourage Trenton lawmakers to provide a funding match.

    Fulop said that although Jersey City has light rail, it stands to benefit from an extension in Bergen County. Jersey City, he said, has had massive growth in jobs, but can’t build more roads to bring people into the city. “More access points and the better that light rail system is, the better Hudson will be and the better Bergen will be,” said Fulop.

    “We want to coordinate an effort, multi-county, and create the understanding it’s a statewide issue,” said Fulop. “It creates jobs. It makes Jersey more competitive and it’s important to the entire state.”

    Huttle said he expects a final document to go to the FTA in the summer of 2015.

    Email: rouse@northjersey.com

    - See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/engl....k4pGh0rV.dpuf

  14. #284
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Expansion Module for HBLR Cars

    Found this video that just further cements the HBLR standing as a vital, successful, and heavily used mode of mass transit and as the most successful light rail system in the state. If the previous posts about the need to expand to Bergen County and added more off peak service to meet the need of surging ridership don't convince you otherwise, I suggest you watch this video from this past summer about how they are now making the cars larger by adding an extension module to meet the ever growing ridership.:

    Last edited by JCMAN320; April 30th, 2014 at 04:52 PM.

  15. #285

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    The best thing that could happen to the HBLR is for it to enter Manhattan either in a new tunnel (not very likely) or through the Lincoln Tunnel to the PABT. Ridership would explode.

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