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Thread: North Tribeca Development

  1. #1

    Default North Tribeca Development

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/


    Downtown Express photo by Jennifer Bodrow

    Residents fight plan for north Tribeca towers


    By Ronda Kaysen

    Plans for a large-scale development along West St. in Tribeca has some community residents concerned that it may have a dramatic affect on the character of their neighborhood.

    Developer Jack Parker recently submitted an application to the Department of City Planning to develop a four-block site extending from West to Washington Sts. and from Watts to Hubert. His application has requested to build up to 210 feet on West St., in an area of mostly low-rise buildings.

    In a move to influence the process, the Tribeca Community Association and the Canal West Coalition launched an ad campaign dubbed Stop the Wall in reference to the so-called wall that will be the result of the 210-foot development. Earlier this month, the group hosted a Stop the Wall party and has since circulated a petition in the neighborhood. “[City Planning] cannot rezone an entire community for one applicant,” said Carole De Saram, president of the Tribeca Community Association.

    Her group plans to meet with City Planning to “express our displeasure” in the proposal. “We are going to insist that City Planning is tuned into our needs,” she said.

    Friends of Community Board 1 recently hired a consultant, Buckhurst Fish & Jacquemart, to work with the community. Judy Duffy, a Friends member and assistant district manager for C.B. 1 would like to see the north Tribeca neighborhood rezoned in much the same way the rest of Tribeca was zoned in 1995. “What’s really happening [in the neighborhood] is not consistent with the zoning,” she said. Historically home to printing shops, which have mostly moved out of Manhattan, the neighborhood is zoned for manufacturing. Parker’s application requests to change the zoning from manufacturing to commercial, allowing for residential and commercial development.

    According to Duffy, aspects of Parker’s plan, such as the large underground parking lot, may benefit the community, but she suspects that the community board will not support the project in its current form. “We have a lot of concerns,” she said. “It would double the population of the area.”

    The Jack Parker Corporation, however, insists it will work with the community to reach a resolution. “We’re looking forward to speaking with people on the community board who are concerned about this and we will discuss what we’re planning,” said Richard Gordon, general counsel for the developer.

    Some residents, though, see development — and tall development — as not only an inevitable part of the process, but a potentially beneficial part as well. “Once you go over 19 stories, there’s no difference between that and 30 stories,” said Arthur Gregory, a Downtown resident and owner of the A & M Roadhouse, referring to the increase in shadow and loss of views. A taller building gives the community more leverage with the developer to demand amenities, he added.

    “If they stopped everything, there wouldn’t be any businesses in New York,” Gregory said. “There’s not going to be a section of Manhattan that doesn’t have tall building, it just took longer to get to Tribeca.”

    City Planning may certify the application as early as December, according to Duffy of C.B. 1, after that it will appear before the community board for review.


    Downtown Express is published by
    Community Media LLC.
    Email: josh@downtownexpress.com

    “Once you go over 19 stories, there’s no difference between that and 30 stories,” said Arthur Gregory, a Downtown resident and owner of the A & M Roadhouse, referring to the increase in shadow and loss of views.
    The area extends from one block north of the new River Lofts to Watts St (one block south of Canal St). There is an existing low rise building on the lot between Watts and Canal. The rest is a 2 storey truck repair garage (closed I think), parking lots, and assorted junk. Anything over 90 ft is going to block views from Washington St, and no one is going to pay to develop 90 ft buildings on these sites.

    The built-up area of the neighborhood is very interesting, but nothing was going to happen with the remaining crap.

  2. #2

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    It's amazing that people have the chutzpah to complain about derelict buildings and parking lots being replaced with a new (and presumably nice) building. Only in New York... and I wouldn't be surprised if half of those complaining lived in rent controlled apartments that cost them nothing.

  3. #3

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    i agree.. i was just walking thru that exact area this weekend and calling the buildings derilect would be a compliment. Anything that is developed in that area would be a huge improvement.

  4. #4
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    A review of the new residential buildings erected in the last two years, on West Street and Washington Street, from 14th Street to ChambersSt, shows great consideration given to the neighborhoods and a rather admirable restraint in building excessively high.

    It is interesting that CB1 is not injecting itself into this directly. The cryptic "Friends of CB1" looks ready to play their part in this charade.

  5. #5

    Default

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/

    Competing ideas to change height limits in North Tribeca

    By Ronda Kaysen


    The Jack Parker Corporation has applied to change the zoning on four blocks along West St. to allow for 210 foot buildings, but consultants hired by Friends of Community Board 1 are studying a larger area and are considering a 120-foot limit.


    In a move to assure community input on developer Jack Parker’s pending zoning application for four North Tribeca blocks, Community Board 1 sent a letter to the Department of City Planning this week calling for an Environmental Impact Statement, a move that would effectively delay the developer’s zoning application and require additional community input. The board is also considering filing an application of its own to rezone the entire North Tribeca neighborhood in contrast with Parker’s application.

    The Jack Parker Corporation is currently awaiting certification from City Planning for its re-zoning application for a four-block site extending from West to Washington Sts. and from Watts to Hubert, leased to the corporation by the Ponte Family. Parker’s application, which has requested to build up to 210 feet on West St., in an area of mostly low-rise buildings, has been met with heavy criticism from neighborhood and community groups. C.B. 1 members are considering applying for a 120-foot limit. If City Planning heeds the board’s request for an E.I.S.— a request echoed by a similar letter sent from the Tribeca Community Association a few weeks earlier — then the community will have the opportunity to weigh in on the environmental effects of the developer’s plans to build what some critics have referred to as a “wall” along the waterfront.

    “This meets all the criteria for a full E.I.S.,” said Carole De Saram, president of Tribeca Community Association, a community group that helped landmark the Tribeca neighborhood in 1992. De Saram cited the development’s potential impact on traffic, waterfront access, air quality and light as criteria for an impact statement. “If City Planning requests anything but a full E.I.S., then the process is being short-circuited,” she said.

    An impact statement will also insure the community’s opportunity to respond to the development long before City Planning certifies the re-zoning application. “An E.I.S. means there’s a lot of community involvement and community involvement is very important,” said Richard Barrett, a steering committee member of the Canal West Coalition, a neighborhood group created by T.C.A.

    The Tribeca and Canal groups launched a series of advertisements in the fall called “Stop the Wall” intended to raise awareness about the development. “Our waterfront is our most important resource,” Barrett said. “For those people who have waterfront access to also have an inappropriate height limit is ludicrous. It’s like someone going to the opera with a front row seat and wearing a ten-gallon hat.”

    Not all aspects of the development evoke such community ire, however. The proposed 180-car underground garage, for example, is less worrisome to the board, said the board’s assistant district manager, Judy Duffy, in an October interview with Downtown Express.

    The board agrees with the developer that the current manufacturing zoning of the neighborhood is outdated, but disagrees with him as to how the area should ultimately be re-zoned. “There is some merit in changing the usage from manufacturing to commercial [zoning],” said Albert Capsouto, chairperson of the board’s Tribeca committee. “[Parker] is looking at what he feels he can maximize his development with, we’re looking at what is more in context with the whole area comprehensively.”

    A more contextual change, said Capsouto, would be one in conjunction with the recent zoning change in Hudson Sq. and the zoning change 10 years ago of the rest of Tribeca — south of N. Moore St. “We see the whole area as ripe for a zoning change,” he said, referring to the North Tribeca area from West St. to Broadway. The northern boundary is Canal St. and the southern boundaries are Hubert St., Beach St., Ericsson Place, N. Moore St. and Walker St.

    Frank Fish, a principal at Buckhurst Fish & Jacquemart Inc, a consulting firm hired by Friends of Community Board 1 — a non-profit organization that along with Community Board 1 is led by Madelyn Wils — to help develop a zoning plan, presented the firm’s ideas for rezoning the area at a Dec. 2 Tribeca committee meeting. Fish suggested the neighborhood be rezoned from manufacturing to commercial use. He suggested using the same zoning criteria that was used for Tribeca South and Hudson Square, C6-2A. Fish’s proposal would call for a Floor Area Ratio of 5, with a 120-foot height limit, and an 80-foot street wall. Parker’s proposal calls for a F.A.R. of 7.5 and a 210-foot height limit.

    “If the board does this [submits a rezoning proposal], then it does raise a question about the Jack Parker re-zoning,” Fish said.

    Richard Gordon, general counsel for the Jack Parker Corporation, declined to comment.

    Fish encouraged the board to work swiftly to devise a plan so City Planning will be inclined to consider the Parker proposal simultaneously with the board’s plan. “In an ideal world, one would be getting it [the application] to City Planning certainly by the time of certification, if not beforehand,” Fish said.

    A significant zoning proposal requires time and community input, according to board members, and may not happen within one or two months, as Fish recommended. “We obviously have to do public hearings on it and outreach to the public,” Duffy said.

    City Planning received the board’s letter requesting an E.I.S. and alerting the department to its current zoning study. According to City Planning press secretary, Rachaele Raynoff, the department’s Environmental Assessment and Review Division is reviewing the board’s request.

    Rezoning the area may impact not only the Parker development plan, but future plans as well. “Everybody realizes there’s a land risk going on,” Duffy said. “If we don’t get some zoning in place, we’re going to be battling block by block.”

    Ronda@DowntownExpress.com

    Downtown Express and downtownexpress.com
    are registered trademarks of Community Media, LLC

  6. #6

    Default Tribeca Towers

    Tribeca Towers I
    273-279 West Street
    20 stories 210 feet
    Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel, Architects
    Dev-The Jack Parker Corporation
    Residential
    260,000-275,000 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed

    Tribeca Towers II
    273-279 West Street
    20 stories 210 feet
    Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel, Architects
    Dev-The Jack Parker Corporation
    Residential
    260,000-275,000 Sq. Ft.
    Proposed



    http://www.tribecatrib.com/newsoct04/inbrief.html

    Opposition to North Tribeca ‘Wall’
    A developer’s effort to dramatically raise the heights of buildings he is allowed to put up on four waterfront blocks of north Tribeca is being met with resistence by neighbors of the site.

    Two community groups, the Tribeca Organization and the Canal West Coalition are placing ads and beginning a petition campaign to “stop the wall” of tall, view-blocking housing.

    The Jack Parker Group wants to build on a three-block site between Watts and West Streets that extends from Watts to Hubert. If he is successful in his application to the Department of City Planning, he could build up to 210 feet on West Street, in an area of mostly low-rise buildings.

    Residents in the area say they will be hemmed in by the tall buildings. “Part of the beauty of Tribeca is its openness and its closeness to the river,” said Albert Capsouto, whose home and restaurant, Capsouto Frers, is nearby. “I don’t think there should be a wall between the waterfront and the interior.”

    Neighbors also want some say in the kinds of commercial uses that will be allowed—or disallowed—in a zoning change.

    With the help of a consultant, Friends of Community Board 1 is working on a zoning plan for all north Tribeca.


    Rendering from Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel, Architects web site.
    http://www.gkvarchitects.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Tribeca Towers 1  GKVA.JPG 
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  7. #7

    Default

    Hot apt. complex...Tribeca Towers I

  8. #8

    Thumbs up One York Street

    One York Street
    7-11 Laight Street/1-7 York Street
    12 stories (6 story addition)
    Ten Arquitectos
    Dev-One York Property LLC
    Residential
    Under Construction 2005-2006

    Ten Arquitectos

    http://www.ten-arquitectos.com






  9. #9

    Default One York St update

    I don't understand why, but I knew there would be some resistance to this.


    Architect Enrique Norten’s design for a glass addition to One York St., just south of Canal


    Glass tower addition draws some critics

    By Ronda Kaysen

    It's said that people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. That doesn't mean their neighbors can't lob as many as they want. Neighbors of one glass residential conversion recently took a few shots at an Enrique Norten-designed condo building coming their way.

    “It looks like L.A. landed in the area,” 260 West Broadway resident Paul Yeager told Community Board 1 members at a full board meeting this week. The 12-story conversion will occupy an entire block bounded by Laight and York Sts., directly south of Canal St – and cattycorner to Yeager’s building. “We just don’t think it’s in context with the area.”

    “It looks out of place, as far as I’m concerned,” board member Joe Lerner said at the meeting. “I just don’t see it floating.”

    Norten, the celebrity Mexican architect and one of the World Trade Center Memorial Competition jurors, has designed a glass-fronted building, inserted in the center of a pre-Civil War manufacturing building, with several floors of glass floating above the building’s original rooftop. The 150-ft. tall structure will include 6,000-sq. ft. of retail space and a 14,000-sq. ft. community center, most likely for the Chinese American Planning Council, which currently occupies the existing building. Although few resist a residential conversion, many are frustrated with the scale and bulk of the transformed building. The developer is applying for permits to allow for the residential conversion, enlargement of the building, the community facility and a parking garage.

    “The architecture itself had mixed reviews [from committee members],” Tribeca Committee chairperson Albert Capsouto said in a telephone interview. His committee reviewed the project earlier this month and drafted a resolution in support of the four special permits requested by the developer. “If it were a little lower, I could deal with it a bit better.”

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and Norten sees no problem with his modern structure. “The gentleman -- with all due respect -- can have his own opinion, but it is a very uneducated opinion,” he said of Yeager, the West Broadway resident.

    Although C.B. 1 has requested the Department of City Planning rezone North Tribeca for residential use and cap height at 120 feet – 30 feet lower than One York St. -- as it now stands, the developer is free to build as tall as he pleases on the property, which is not a landmark. The project, however, is neither as tall nor as bulky as current standards allow. C.B. 1 recommended City Planning approve the permits.

    The 122,000 sq. ft. project, known as One York St., embodies the challenge of designing a modern structure within an old building, developer Stanley Perelman said after the meeting. To simply mimic a 19th century structure would be inappropriate and outdated. “The real challenge would be to do a project that keeps the architectural vocabulary and speaks to the community,” he said.

    Perelman, a ten-year Tribeca resident, intends to live in the 41-unit dwelling once it opens in early 2007. Work is expected to begin in July and take 18 months to complete. He insists construction will be restricted to weekdays and the 47-car garage planned for the building will be reserved for residents only. “We’ll try and be as a good a neighbor as we can,” he told the board.

    Ronda@DowntownExpress.com

    View south on 6th Ave, north of Canal St. One York St is the tan building on the right.


  10. #10

    Default 137-141 Duane Street

    Globe St.
    Developer Plans Tribeca Condo
    By Barbara Jarvie
    Last updated: May 31, 2005 07:52am


    NEW YORK CITY-A locally based developer has acquired a Tribeca site and will transform it from a 74,000-sf rental building into a condominium complex. The property is currently a six-story building occupied on the lower level by Megu, a Japanese cuisine restaurant. The unnamed borrower intends to immediately convert the building.

    The also locally based Multi Capital Group arranged and closed an 18-month loan facility for $32 million in connection with their client's purchase of 137-141 Duane St., which is also known as 92 Thomas St. MCG’s Eli Verschleiser says the firm was able to get the lender to close the transaction within three weeks of bringing the deal to them. For the most part, everything’s converted, and developers are moving east to old office buildings around City Hall Park and into the North-West corridor, west of Hudson street, where some vacant space still lingers un-marketed,” according to a real estate investment banker at Multi Capital.

    MCG executives identified the client as a “a leading multifamily/office building owner and operator for over 30 years who owns and/or manages more than five million sf of real estate in the tri-state region. The developer has a proven track record of successfully developing and repositioning properties in all of the Tri-State markets. The client has extensive experience with all aspects of multifamily real estate including: land assemblage and planning, construction rehabilitation and residential condominium conversions.” Vincent Nicoletta, Esq. from Greenberg Nicoletta & Stein LLP represented the developer and James Hausman, Esq. from Meister Seelig & Fein LLP represented the lender.

  11. #11
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    From http://cityrealty.com:

    Lispenard Street conversion 19-JUL-05

    The very handsome, 7-story building at 60 Lispenard Street in TriBeCa has been converted to 9 condominium apartments. It is across the street from the rear entrance to Pearl’s Paint, whose main entrance is around the corner on Canal Street.

    The building was erected in 1895 by former New York City mayor and shipping magnate William R. Grace. It has now been named “The Wanamaker,” although the famous New York branch of the famous Philadelphia store, which was several blocks to the north on the northeast corner of Broadway and 9th Streets, burned down in 1956.

    The apartments at 60 Lispenard have wood-burning fireplaces, cast-iron columns, central heating and air-conditioning, high ceilings, recessed lighting, and full-floor loft apartments of about 3,700-square feet and other units of 2,500 square feet.

    The beige-brick building has a one-story rusticated limestone base with large arched windows on the 6th floor and smaller arched windows on the 7th floor. Floors 4 through 6 have lovely stone rosettes on the spandrels. The building, which has an elevator, is just west of a small parking lot, and a block and a half east of a park at Avenue of the Americas.

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    Don't they ever get tired of "handsome?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686
    Where on Cityrealty are these stories located?
    Last edited by Edward; July 20th, 2005 at 03:32 PM. Reason: Quote too long

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    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686
    Thanks...looks like Beekman's ready to rock...where's the plans...????

    Rattner/Gehry Lower Manhattan tower to start construction in January 20-JUL-05
    Construction of the 75-story mixed-use tower on a parking lot just south of Pace University and just west of the NYU Downtown Hospital near City Hall is expected to start in January, according to Mark Donnenfeld, the chairman of the Seaport committee of Community Board 1.

    The committee was given a presentation last night by Andrew Herman of the Department of Transportation of the planned reconstruction of Beekman Street, which is the southern boundary of the tower, which is being developed by Forest City Rattner and designed by Frank Gehry.

    Rattner and Gehry have also teamed up for a massive project in Brooklyn that will create a new arena for the New York Nets as well as a phalanx of angled, tall office and residential towers, a plan that was recently heralded on the front page of The New York Times as creating a new skyline for Brooklyn. Forest City Rattner is the developer of a new headquarters under construction on Eighth Avenue at 40th Street for The New York Times. The Rattner/Gehry plan for Brooklyn was soon followed by a competing and smaller proposal for much of the same site from Extell Management.

    The Rattner/Gehry design for the new tower to the south of the Manhattan entrance and exit to the Brooklyn Bridge has not yet been shown publicly or even shown to Community Board 1.

    Mr. Donnenfeld said that the 75-story tower will be placed on the west end of the site with a 13,000-square-foot plaza at the east end. The tower will contain a new, 600-student6 public school as well as expansion facilities for the hospital. Originally, it was also intended to contain expansion facilities for Pace University, but that institution withdrew from the plan last year. The tower will also contain a mix of several hundred rental and condominium apartments, but not details have been released.

    Apart from the planned Freedom Tower at the former World Trade Center site not far away, this tower is one of the most anticipated designs in the city along with Santiago Calatrava’s planned tower at 80 South Street for Frank Sciame. Gehry’s design for the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, has been widely hailed as one of the most important designs of the last century and it catapulted him to the top of the list of the world’s most influential architects. He designed a somewhat similar design for the same museum for a site south of the South Street Seaport along the East River but the museum abandoned the project recently because of funding concerns. Gehry also had submitted a design for the new tower for The New York Times, but he subsequently withdrew from that project, so this tower will be his first major project to be built in Manhattan.

    In a September 5, 2004 article in The New York Times, architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff wrote that Gehry’s design for this tower “is conceived as a series of undulating glass panels that hang down over the building’s structural frame like flowing drapery,” adding that “The curtain-like surfaces split apart at various points, then peel open at the top to create an almost classical crown.”

    The rebuilding of Beekman Street and its sidewalks is expected to take about 18 months, according to Mr. Herman, but Mr. Donnenfeld said that such a schedule would be “total hell” and “not acceptable,” given the simultaneous start of construction of the Rattner/Gehry tower and the fact that several of the surrounding buildings are residential and landmarks.

    The new school is not expected to open before 2008.

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