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Thread: 150 Amsterdam Avenue - 42-story residential tower - by Handel Architects

  1. #16

    Default Re: Red Cross Building

    Quote Originally Posted by elfgam
    ...am I the only person who thinks that the Red-Cross office building is actually a really nice piece of architecture? There must be other sites...
    This piece of real estate is underutilized, the market said so.
    For what it's worth, I think the Red cross building is nice, but not THAT nice.

  2. #17

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    In a city as liberal as New York, no one would ever dream of pushing people out of housing projects to make way for upper class people. Personally, I disagree with the notion that poor people have a right to live in Manhattan. I'd like to have a winter house in Palm Beach, but as I don't have a spare $10m, I accept that I won't have that luxury. Living in Manhattan is a luxury -- not a right.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer
    In a city as liberal as New York, no one would ever dream of pushing people out of housing projects to make way for upper class people. Personally, I disagree with the notion that poor people have a right to live in Manhattan. I'd like to have a winter house in Palm Beach, but as I don't have a spare $10m, I accept that I won't have that luxury. Living in Manhattan is a luxury -- not a right.
    Agreed 100%. As soon as you force "affordable housing" on developers, in circumvention of the laws of supply and demand, you automatically introduce an incentive for corruption. Who is to determine whether a particular applicant, rather than an alternative choice, has a right to a particularly juicy bit of mispriced affordable housing?

    As for opera, I particularly enjoyed La Traviatta, the Queen of Spades, Il Barbieri di Seviglia, and, most recently, Carmen

  4. #19

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    I agree.

    P.S.: It's nice to see that we have several opera afficionados on this site!

    P.P.S.: Carmen is great!!

  5. #20

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    Who can hear the Overture from The Barber of Seville and not think of Bugs Bunny?
    "Welcome to my shop,let me chop your mop"!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jiw40
    Who can hear the Overture from The Barber of Seville and not think of Bugs Bunny?
    "Welcome to my shop,let me chop your mop"!
    Hee hee.

  7. #22

  8. #23

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    NY Post
    RED CROSS SNAPS UP NEW HQ
    By LOIS WEISS


    http://www.nypost.com/business/24333.htm

    May 26, 2005 -- The American Red Cross in Greater New York has bought 514 W. 49th St. to be its future headquarters for $33 million.

    Gensler Architects will oversee $30 million in renovations to make the 100,000-foot building a high-tech emergency control center, headquarters and volunteer center.

    The four-story building includes an additional full basement with street access and a parking lot.

    "The architect is excited about what he can do," said Richard Kane, a Red Cross spokesperson. "The 49th Street wall is all windows and has incredible light and will be a wonderful place to work."

    Its current headquarters at 180 Amsterdam Ave. was sold for $72 million to a developer and is being rented back until the new space is ready in the fall of 2006.

    "It was everything we wanted," said Ira Schuman of Studley who represented the relief group.

    The former Central Laundry building was sold for New York Industrial Buildings by Kamel Bahary of GVA Williams.




    I really like their current building for some reason. =(

  9. #24
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    August 19, 2005

    City OK’s aid for American Red Cross’ new home


    by Catherine Tymkiw

    The city’s Industrial Development Agency will give financing assistance to the American Red Cross to help the nonprofit buy and renovate a building on Manhattan’s West Side that will become its new New York headquarters.

    The IDA approved $30 million in tax-exempt bonds to help the Red Cross acquire and renovate a 104,000-square-foot warehouse building that sits on 25,000 square feet of land at 514 W. 49th Street, according to spokeswoman for the agency. The Red Cross bought the land and the building for $33 million. It plans to keep the building’s outer shell and gut the rest for an additional $31.4 million, bringing the total cost of the project to $64.4 million.

    The Red Cross plans to create a state-of-the-art space to provide disaster services and health and safety education. “It took a bit of looking to find the right place to go,” said Larry Geiger, a Red Cross spokesman. The nonprofit has been in its soon-to-be-former headquarters since 1962, before Lincoln Center was even built. It plans to move into the new space in Sept. 2006.

    The Red Cross sold its 150,000-square-foot headquarters at 150 Amsterdam Avenue, in May 2004 to developers A & R Kalimian Realty for $72 million. The City Opera has been in talks about possibly building a new home on the site, which would include a residential tower. The New York Blood Center, which is not moving with the Red Cross, currently occupies about 25% to 30% of the building.



    Blood Center plans Queens move in 2006


    by Catherine Tymkiw

    The New York Blood Center, the area's largest nonprofit, plans to relocate its offices to Long Island City, Queens, from Manhattan’s Upper West Side during the second half of 2006.

    The nonprofit recently signed a 20-year lease for 75,000 square feet of a building located at 4501 Vernon Blvd. The center plans to renovate the space to turn it into a state-of-the-art facility and invest back into the community, said Linda Levi, a spokeswoman for the center.

    The new office will house about 300 employees, including some new hires, she said.

    The move would remove a potential hurdle facing the City Opera, which wants to build a new home on the site of the Blood Center’s current offices near Lincoln Center, which is also the headquarters of the American Red Cross. The Blood Center has been occupying 25% to 30% of the 150,000-square-foot building. The Red Cross also plans to move.

    The blood center, founded in 1964, employs 1,500 people at locations throughout the city. Ranked as the largest New York nonprofit by 2004 operating expenses, the center provides more than 1 million pints of blood annually to about 200 hospitals in New York City, northern and central New Jersey and the Hudson Valley.



    ©2005 Crain Communications Inc.
    Last edited by krulltime; August 22nd, 2005 at 12:05 AM.

  10. #25
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Good news! The Blood Center and The Red Cross are both moving! Now the next step is the destruction of this building.

  11. #26

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    Poor little Luxembourg, to have such a graceless lump laid on it! Looks like it belongs in Los Angeles.

    Seems they learned nothing from Citizen Krier.

  12. #27
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    The New York Times
    April 27, 2006
    City Opera Plans New Hall With Ties to Lincoln Center
    By ROBIN POGREBIN

    The New York City Opera is close to a deal to build a concert hall in the base of a new apartment building planned for the former American Red Cross site near Lincoln Center, people involved in the plan say.

    "They're very close to making a deal; it all looks very good," said Martin J. Oppenheimer, a vice chairman of City Opera. "The city is very supportive. Lincoln Center is very supportive."

    In the new building, the opera company is to have a theater of about 1,800 seats with the expected cost about $350 million. The design for the interior was done by Hugh Hardy, that of the building itself by Christian de Portzamparc.

    The financial details are not fully worked out, and people involved in the project emphasize that the deal is not done. Still uncertain, for example, is how much the city might contribute. "They're trying to work it out," said Gale A. Brewer, a city councilwoman who represents the West Side. "Financing is very complicated."

    Paul Kellogg, City Opera's general and artistic director, did not return calls seeking comment.

    City Opera has long sought its own home, since it shares the New York State Theater at Lincoln Center with the New York City Ballet. That stage was designed for dance, with acoustics that muffle footfalls. The opera company tried unsuccessfully to win a place at ground zero, proposing a 2,200-seat theater that was expected to cost about $300 million.

    The developer A. & R. Kalimian Realty bought the Red Cross site, on Amsterdam Avenue between 66th and 67th Streets, in 2004 for about $72 million and is expected to build a rental tower that would include moderately priced housing.

    Because the Red Cross site is not zoned for a high-rise, Lincoln Center was expected to sell or transfer some of its air rights to the opera. But several of Lincoln Center's other constituent groups resisted that plan because it clashed with their own interests. "It comes out of everybody's pocket because you're essentially subsidizing more capacity," said one executive from a Lincoln Center constituent, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation.

    As a result, the city may transfer the air rights over Lincoln Center's Josie Robertson fountain plaza, which is city-owned land.

    Indeed, City Opera's new theater could create a glut of theater space. Jazz at Lincoln Center has two halls at Columbus Circle, Alice Tully Hall is to be renovated and the performance space planned for ground zero could include several stages.

    In City Opera's absence, New York City Ballet will be expected to fill the State Theater. "Obviously it's a challenge, but it's a challenge that can be met," said Mr. Oppenheimer, who is also chairman of the New York State Theater. "It's going to be a great ballet house. We will reach out to other ballet companies."

    City Opera's quest for independence has been a long-running story. The company considered renovating the State Theater, which City Ballet resisted. It considered building a home in Damrosch Park at Lincoln Center, which the Metropolitan Opera successfully opposed. After losing out on ground zero, the opera considered a move to a nearby space downtown, but that ultimately went to Goldman Sachs.

    Then the opera toyed with the idea of reconfiguring City Center and asked Mr. Hardy to study the possibility. He designed the Glimmerglass Opera theater in Cooperstown, N.Y., where Mr. Kellogg is also artistic director. Mr. Hardy found the City Center idea unworkable because the fly space was inadequate for the opera's scenery.

    Lincoln Center is pleased that City Opera will retain its affiliation with the campus. "Lincoln Center is eager to have it happen," said Martin Segal, a chairman emeritus of Lincoln Center. "That's where the opera belongs."

  13. #28
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
    The picture makes that building look nice. I don't know if I'm for or against this. I have to see it myself.
    Help! I couldn't find the photo/illustration.

  14. #29
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    This is a nice building. I also don't know how I feel about tearing it down until we see what the new tower will look like in a rendering. If it's another boring heap like so many recent others, then I'll be disappointed. We deserve something magnificent in that location.

  15. #30
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    If Portzamparc is designing the new building then we could get something great.

    His design for Park Ave. South:




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