Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 83

Thread: New York Public Library Restoration

  1. #31

    Default

    As per the article posted above, the a-holes at the library still plan to sell the nice building on 40th and 5th to some pig who will raze it. That sucks.

  2. #32

    Default

    West side of the library cleaned.


  3. #33
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    This is a bit old now, but I think it's really cool .


    READ Sculpture Made of 25,000 Dr. Seuss Books at New York Public Library

    by Lori Zimmer, 03/25/11



    The Target Corporation has been a longtime supporter of the arts, and now they’ve banded with the New York Public Library to help advocate children’s literacy. As part of the New York City Read Across America event, a giant red display of “READ” — made entirely from Dr. Seuss books between the library’s iconic lion statues !



    Many celebrities were on hand to kick off the event, such as Uma Thurman, Mark Ruffalo and Keri Russell, each picking from their favorite Dr. Seuss stories. The epic READ sculpture, designed by David Stark, was made of 25,000 Dr. Seuss books, which were then generously donated to public schools across New York. Target also sponsored a Seuss-inspired reading room in the library, where kids and parents could read hard covered Dr. Seuss books, enjoy Seuss-themed snacks (green eggs and ham sandwiches!), and don red and white Cat in the Hat headgear.

    A collaboration between the National Education Association and Target, the 26-foot tall book installation commemorated Dr. Seuss’ birthday on March 2nd. In conjunction with the New York event, which was part of Read Across America Program, Target stores across the nation joined the festivities, holding special in-store Dr. Seuss themed reading events.

    The 25,000 books in the READ sculpture is just part of the Target corporation’s plan to donate $1 billion to education related programs by 2015.

    Photos © David Stark

    http://www.inhabitots.com/read-sculp...ublic-library/

  4. #34
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    East Midtown
    Posts
    6,832

    Default

    The library looks fantastic in the daylight. Now I've been trying to find information on when the exterior night lighting will be finished, but could only find a vague statement about them hoping to finish by April. Now it's April 23, and I haven't seen any lights yet. I can't wait!

  5. #35
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Banishing the books

    NY Public Library’s huge mistake

    By IVAN KENNEALLY

    Is moving 3 million books out of the main branch of the New York Public Library really the way to a better future?

    The NYPL’s main branch, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, is poised to undergo its most radical renovation in decades. The cornerstone of the Central Library Plan is the relocation of more than 3 million books housed under the iconic Rose Reading Room — many of which will be exiled to Princeton, NJ.

    NYPL President Anthony Marx says the chief idea behind the Central Library Plan is the desire to “replace books with people,” since “that’s the future of where libraries are going.”

    Lyin’ in wait . . . for computer users: The NYPL believes pulling 3 million books from its flagship branch will somehow help attract more patrons.

    Actually, he’s not replacing books with people but with computers — which are, the logic goes, irresistible magnets for eager new readers, who are apparently disenfranchised from the library by the space devoured by those darn books.

    The NYPL will spend at least $250 million on this project — at a time when it has slashed its workforce by 27 percent since 2008 and its acquisition budget by nearly as much. The resources lavished on the renovation of the Schwarzman building come at the expense of the 91 other branches, many starving for funds. But these are minor issues compared to the rewriting of the NYPL’s core mission.

    The twin pillars of the project, we’re told, are 1) modernization, meaning the digitization of books, and 2) democratization, understood as the increasing accessibility of the library as a physical space. Both require a seismic reconsideration of the central function of the library within society.

    Yes, the movement from physical to electronic books promises many conveniences for readers. But it’s probably wrong to expect a change in the delivery of books to inspire a rekindled reverence for them — as if lovers of language would read more if books just weren’t so heavy. Turning the library into a vast Internet cafe is unlikely to expand or improve its chief purpose.

    Yes, exiling the books will more than double the amount of space available to library patrons. Yet this overlooks the fact that readers are attracted to the NYPL’s crown jewel precisely because of its impressive storehouse of books. If you just want to connect to the Internet, Midtown Manhattan has plenty of other options.

    And just how does adding space actually make the library more accessible or more democratic? The public library is already an inherently democratic institution — equalizing access to the tools of learning, wrenching them away from the hallowed but expensive corridors of our universities.

    The real issue is the cardinal importance of literature to the health of our democracy.

    The great French student of America, Alexis de Tocqueville, once observed that literature and the enjoyment of the arts are often underappreciated in a democracy, overtaken by the obsession with productivity and work. He noticed that Americans “do not make these pleasures the principle charms of their existence” but only turn to them “furtively” as a “necessary relaxation in the midst of the serious work of life.”

    The Central Library Plan promises to make the library a more efficient system for delivering text to a busy consumer. The problem here is that the deepest purpose of the library in a democracy is to help slow us down and provide sanctuary from work, a place that encourages leisurely contemplation.

    Great literature, the best of what any library has to offer, helps cultivate sensitivity to beauty and greatness — goods sometimes lost in our frenzied pursuit of practical interests. The custodians of the NYPL ought to realize that reading amidst cascading walls of books, inspiring celebrations of intellectual achievement, might also help do the same.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion...#ixzz1l7kuoUYz

  6. #36

    Default

    Yes, exiling the books will more than double the amount of space available to library patrons. Yet this overlooks the fact that readers are attracted to the NYPL’s crown jewel precisely because of its impressive storehouse of books. If you just want to connect to the Internet, Midtown Manhattan has plenty of other options.
    THank You. That's it in a nutshell. As convenient as the internet is, people want to pick up a book that they can flip through & get all the info in one shot on a particular subject, instead of the scattered meanderings of the internet.


    He noticed that Americans “do not make these pleasures the principle charms of their existence” but only turn to them “furtively” as a “necessary relaxation in the midst of the serious work of life.”
    I mostly disagree with this, although I won't say he's completely wrong. People who go to the library for books simply don't want to bury their face in another electronic device, as they have to at work, and as they usually do in their personal life, e-readers notwithstanding.

    No doubt NYPL needs more internet access for their patrons, but removing those books is a giant mistake. It will turn into an internet cafe. In my town, they renovated & expanded the library a few years ago, added more computers, & also expanded their book collections, as well as study/reading space for patrons. I was just there Sunday & it was very busy, computers as well as the book aisles. There's plenty of room at NYPL for that also.

  7. #37
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Re: Removal of 3,000,000 volumes

    What percentage of the total number of books currently stored in the vast racks of the NYPL Fifth Avenue branch would this 3,000,000 make up?

    If many of those are multiple copies of little, if ever, viewed books then it could be an OK decision.

    This INFO seems to be from 2006, but doesn't specify numbers of books or where they are held:

    According to the latest Mayor's Management Report, New York City's three public library systems had a total library circulation of 35 million broken down as follows: the NYPL and BPL (with 143 branches combined) had a circulation of 15 million, and the QBPL system had a circulation of 20 million through its 62 branch libraries.

  8. #38

    Default

    It's exactly the obscure books that only the NYPL has which make it so special.

  9. #39
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Check It Out: NYPL Books Foster to Renovate Main Branch

    by Dave Hogarty

    After a slight delay caused by a downturn in the economy, The New York Public Library is pushing ahead to transform the Stephen A. Schwarzman main branch on Fifth Avenue into the nation's largest circulation library, while unloading other very large branches nearby. British starchitect Norman Foster will design the new circulating library destined for the main branch, below the Rose Reading Room. Circulating stacks will remain in levels beneath Bryant Park, which Foster's branch-within-a-branch will overlook. Library president Anthony Marx is sanguine in the Times about replacing two million non-circulating volumes (being re-located to New Jersey) with a circulation library. "We need to provide the opportunity to browse for books at a time when bookstores are closing. Scholars and researchers should be able to enjoy the serendipity of what they find on the shelf."

    Plans for the main branch are projected to cost $300 million. In order to fund the transformation of the Stephen A. Schwarzman branch, the City will chip in $150 million, and the balance will be raised through donations and via the sale of three nearby branches. The NYPL will close its Mid-Manhattan Branch, just across Fifth Avenue from the main branch on 40th Street. The Science, Industry, and Business Library space on 34th Street and Madison Avenue will also being checked out of the NYPL property catalog. The NYPL already sold the Donnell library branch (closed in 2008) to Tribeca Associates and Starwood Capital in July.

    Ambitions Rekindled at Public Library [NYT]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...ranch.php#more

  10. #40

    Default

    A bad idea all around. The main branch is perfect as is, and removing half the books will make it far less valuable. If the NYPL has $300M burning a hole in its pocket, it should use that money to restore the branch libraries, many of which are in disgraceful condition.

  11. #41
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    But the new funders want their name on the big trophies, not in some neighborhood where those they want to impress will never see the inscription.

  12. #42

    Default

    Sorry for my ignorance, but WHAT do they wanna renovate in this branch? I was in the library during my last visit in 2010 and it looked neat. I dont see anything that NEEDS renovation in this library.

  13. #43
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    It's about re-allocation of interior space, and re-purposing what's hidden away from public view.

  14. #44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by germantower View Post
    Sorry for my ignorance, but WHAT do they wanna renovate in this branch? I was in the library during my last visit in 2010 and it looked neat. I dont see anything that NEEDS renovation in this library.
    They aren't renovating the existing public spaces, which are beautiful.

    They're basically expanding the library, by taking the private space under Bryant Park (a vast multilevel area of storage stacks, built during the 1990's, I think), and converting them to public space.

    Norman Foster will basically convert private storage space to public reading space.

  15. #45

    Default

    Really, Norman Foster just to convert a basement without access to natural light? Is that necessary for an underground space?

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Greenwich Street 'Restoration'
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: December 21st, 2013, 05:05 PM
  2. The Bronx River's Restoration
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: December 8th, 2012, 11:29 PM
  3. Public Observation Decks
    By JCDJ in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: August 5th, 2003, 03:36 PM
  4. Big Planning Projects: Avoiding the Public?
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: April 10th, 2003, 12:33 AM
  5. Former Tiffany Building Gets a Solid Restoration
    By Edward in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: February 13th, 2002, 11:54 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software