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Thread: Gowanus Village

  1. #31

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    This morning the Department of Housing Preservation and Development announced in a press release (full copy on jump) that a consortium comprised of the Hudson Companies, Inc., the Bluestone Organization, the Fifth Avenue Committee and Jonathan Rose Companies was selected to redevelop the Public Place site in Gowanus. The bid, as rendered above, beat out a competing plan put together by a development team helmed by the Related Companies. Hudson's project, as currently envisioned, will involve 774 units of mixed-income housing; 615 of the apartments will be affordable to low- and middle-income families, including 120 units of low-income senior housing. Per the press release, "The mixed-use development will feature over 25,000 square feet of cultural space, 38,000 square feet of ground-floor retail and nearly 100,000 square feet of public open space located along the canal. The canal-side park, in addition to landscaped waterfront space for passive and active recreation, will feature arts and educational programming and significant recreational opportunities for the surrounding community." The site, between Smith Street and the canal, used to contain a gas manufacturing plant.

    CITY ANNOUNCES SELECTION OF DEVELOPER FOR NEW MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT AT PUBLIC PLACE, ON GOWANUS CANAL

    Residential and Commercial Development to Include Over 600 Units of Affordable Housing and Public Space Along the Canal

    New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development Commissioner Shaun Donovan announced the selection today of the team chosen to design and construct a mixed-use development consisting of community, commercial, and residential spaces located along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn. The development team, the Gowanus Green Partnership, is a consortium comprised of the Hudson Companies, Inc., the Bluestone Organization, the Fifth Avenue Committee and Jonathan Rose Companies.

    Marked by pioneering sustainable design in keeping with PlaNYC, Mayor Bloomberg’s plan for a greener, greater New York, the development will result in 774 units of mixed-income housing. 615 apartments will be affordable to low- and middle-income families, including 120 units of low-income senior housing. The mixed-use development will feature over 25,000 square feet of cultural space, 38,000 square feet of ground-floor retail and nearly 100,000 square feet of public open space located along the canal. The canal-side park, in addition to landscaped waterfront space for passive and active recreation, will feature arts and educational programming and significant recreational opportunities for the surrounding community. The overall development is part of the Mayor’s historic New Housing Marketplace Plan, a $7.5 billion commitment to create and preserve 165,000 units of affordable housing, over 70,000 of which have already been financed.

    “I am very pleased to be able to announce the designation of a development team as strong as the Gowanus Green Partnership. Public Place has lain vacant for far too long and its cleanup and redevelopment will be a great benefit to this neighborhood,” said HPD Commissioner Shaun Donovan. “Now, thanks to the Mayor’s New Housing Marketplace Plan—a ten-year plan to create affordable housing for 500,000 New Yorkers—not only will this development provide new affordable housing, commercial space and dynamic new community resources such as the much anticipated boat house and daycare center, it will do so in a way that sets a precedent for future developments by integrating sustainable design features with an impressive level of affordability.”

    Located at the southeast corner of 5th and Smith Streets and bounded to the east by the Gowanus Canal, the development is part of Mayor Bloomberg’s efforts to integrate the Gowanus Canal corridor with the vibrant surrounding communities of Carroll Gardens and Park Slope. The development will serve not only to redevelop long underutilized land into spaces for residents, local business and community groups alike to call home but will also serve to clean up a brown field that has long been a blight on the surrounding neighborhood. The reclamation of brownfields is a major component of PlaNYC, acting to both “create” new land for needed development and improve the environmental quality of the surrounding neighborhoods and the City as a whole.

    The selection of Gowanus Green as the development group for the Public Place site is the culmination of a lengthy community process in which community residents, community-based organization leaders, elected officials and staff from HPD and other city agencies worked together to determine what kind of development would best serve the surrounding communities as well as the City as a whole.

    “After years of discussions and many failed attempts, we as a community can applaud the results of everyone involved in the effort to create a mixed-use development with an emphasis on both senior and affordable housing, housing the Carroll Gardens community desperately needs,” said Assemblywoman Joan Millman.

    “This is the first step in creating an immense amount of affordable housing for the community, especially for our seniors,” said Councilmember Bill de Blasio. “I applaud HPD for working with the task force and the community to pick the best possible proposal. Now that the developer has been selected, we need to continue our dialogue with them and with the community. Throughout the ULURP process I will be following several principles of development when evaluating this project. I will look at the amount of affordable housing, the developer's level of engagement with the community, their ability to be transparent throughout the process, and their commitment to using responsible contractors. Elected officials and government agencies must also work together to evaluate what impact the project will have on the sewer system, public transportation, our public school system and other vital services.”

    Totaling approximately 675,000 square feet, the residential component of the development will consist of 120 units of low-income senior housing and 654 units of mixed-income housing. Of the 654 units of mixed-income housing, 495 will be affordable to families making between 30% and 130% of HUD’s Income Limits—between $23,000 and $99,840 for a family of four or $16,100 and $87,295 for a single person. 380 of the units will be rental, while the remaining 394 will be homeownership.

    The project is expected to be financed in part through The New York City Housing Development Corporation’s Low-Income Affordable Marketplace Program in addition to subsidies from the New York City Housing Trust Fund, part of the Mayor’s $7.5 billion, 165,000-unit New Housing Marketplace Plan, the largest municipal affordable housing initiative in the nation’s history. Construction on the project is anticipated to begin in spring 2010 and be completed in spring 2014.

    Marc Jahr, President of the New York City Housing Development Corporation, said, “HDC is enormously pleased to participate in this ‘green’ public-private partnership. By reclaiming a brownfield for residential use, the Public Place development will serve as a catalyst for the dramatic transformation of the section of the Gowanus Canal and the creation of a new mixed income community.”

    The development team was selected as a result of a Request for Proposals (RFP) issued by the City in July 2007. Of the six proposals submitted, Gowanus Green’s provided the greatest level of affordability, as well as the greatest balance between space dedicated to housing versus that dedicated to open and cultural uses. In addition, architectural partner Rogers Marvel’s focus on sustainable design is sure to qualify many of the development’s buildings for LEED Gold designation while the work of landscape architects West 8 and Starr Whitehouse will help the overall development to qualify for the pioneering LEED Neighborhood Development program.

    Alan Bell, senior partner of the Hudson Companies, said on behalf of the Gowanus Green Partnership, “Our team is excited to bring its diverse talents to bear on Public Place. We look forward to working with the Gowanus and Carroll Gardens communities to realize a shared vision for affordable housing, open space, community facilities, and retail on this site. We believe Gowanus Green will be a transformative development—helping to heal the Gowanus Canal through environmental remediation while providing outstanding design and an array of public amenities to its residents and the neighborhood.”

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...companie_1.php

  2. #32

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    September 2, 2008

    Exclusive New Venue Alert: Littlefield





    This fall Gowanus gets another venue! Located at 622 Degraw Street, this one is called Littlefield and will be housed in an old, 6200-square-foot warehouse renovated with an eco-friendly touch. They tell us "Green elements include a landscaped interior courtyard, sound walls formed from recycled rubber tires, and a bar constructed of salvaged bowling alley lanes."

    Expect live music, film screenings, and art installations from the owners, Julie Kim and Scott Koshnoodi, as well as talent buyers (who include FrictionNYC's Justin Carl and Nghia Nguyen). A moveable partition is designed to separate the main performance space from the bar/courtyard, to give each area an intimate feel. "When the partition is fully closed, the performance space can accommodate up to 200 people while the bar/courtyard can hold up to 100. For larger performances, the partition can be moved to one side and the warehouse can accommodate up to 300 people."

    These are the first images to come out (enlarged floor plan here), and the group has also made some cryptic Blair Witch/Cloverfield-esque videos (watch one here).

    http://gothamist.com/2008/09/02/new_...ittlefield.php

    2003-2008 Gothamist LLC.

  3. #33

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    Gowanus Lounge

    Gowanus Hotel Row is Growing: New Project Underway

    September 3rd, 2008



    Workers have started reducing a President Street warehouse to rubble, clearing the way for another entry in Gowanus’ burgeoning hot-sheet scene hotel boom. A developer named SAI Hospitality plans to build a 100-plus-room hotel in place of the warehouse ; SAI also has designs on another vacant warehouse on the street, between 3rd and 4th avenues, where it says it’s going to put up a second hotel. A few weeks ago, the DOB rejected SAI’s initial application for a new building permit in the spot where demo’s under way, but the application shows a five-story, 117-room property is on the drawing board. We call this stretch of President the Gowanus Hotel Row –not to be confused with the larger Gowanus Hotel District –because, all told, there are three hotels planned for it. In the background is the third hotel on the street, which is now almost complete. We can almost envision a time when tourists unfamiliar with Gowanus will not burst into tears upon alighting from a cab and taking in their surroundings.

  4. #34

    Default Gowanus Whole Foods Toast?

    Gowanus Whole Foods Toast?

    by Tom Acitelli
    September 29, 2008

    Brownstoner.com.
    The proposed Gowanus Whole Foods site.

    That's what Brownstoner's reporting. Evidently, according to a source within the state Department of Environmental Conservation, which must sign off on development on the Gowanus site at Third Street and Third Avenue, the store's a no-go. Besides:
    [E]vidently the trend in the supermarket biz has swung away from superstores, our source notes; in addition, in the wake of poor earnings this summer, Whole Foods announced that it would be cutting back on the number of new stores next year. The likely upshot? Even if Whole Foods decided to open a smaller store in Brooklyn, says our source, it's unlikely it would want to use this site.


    http://www.observer.com/2008/real-es...le-foods-toast

    © 2008 Observer Media Group,

  5. #35

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    October 24, 2008

    CB6 Okays Toll Brothers' Spot Rezoning



    At last night's CB6 Landmark/Land Use committee meeting, members gave the thumbs up to Toll Brothers' request for a spot rezoning of the site along the Gowanus Canal, between Carroll and 2nd Streets. The change would happen in advance of the neighborhood-wide rezoning being undertaken by City Planning, allowing Toll Brothers to erect a mixed-use development with housing between four and 12 stories, a couple of hundred parking spaces and a public park along the canal. According to Pardon Me For Asking, even some members who voted yes did so reluctantly; they want the canal cleaned and feel the best way to make that happen is to have constituents living near it. PFMA points out the Councilman Bill de Blasio lobbied the committee to say yes, and Toll Bros. spent $365,000 on lobbying efforts. Far as we know they don't have to pay for cleaning up the canal.


    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...okays_toll.php

    Brownstoner

  6. #36

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    E]vidently the trend in the supermarket biz has swung away from superstores,
    .
    Gosh did that trend ever even get off the ground in NYC? About the only thing I actually miss about the midwest is how far, far superior their grocery stores are. You can get ANYTHING at them and in all sorts of varieties. There isn't enough space in NYC to accommodate such selection. Understandable, but lamentable when you're used to having more, more, more.

  7. #37

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    Seriously. That's a plus (the only one?) about suburbs all over. Much better groceries than in the city.

    A bit unfair to us that we have to put up with the crappy Targets of the suburbs but, other than WholeFoods or Fairway (neither of which can hold a candle to the "normal" grocery stores you get in the burbs) we don't get any of the suburban food lovin'...

  8. #38

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    At we get the most awesome restaurants in the world as a trade-off.

  9. #39
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The Coignet Stone Company Building On Whole Foods Site Finally Getting Some Love



    It would appear that the small land-marked building on the Whole Foods site at 360 Third Avenue at the corner of Third Street is finally getting some much needed love. A permit for roof repair has been issued by the NYC Buildings Department and late last week, workers were observed at the site. That is encouraging news. Lets hope that it is just the beginning towards restoring and saving this neighborhood gem.

    For quite a few years now, the historic structure has been deteriorating, its beautiful ornate façade slowly crumbling away. Its owner, Richard Kowalski, of Beach Haven, N.J, had signed a Memorandum of Lease with Whole Foods back in 2005, when the company purchased the land surrounding the building in order to construct one of their food markets. Under the lease agreement, Whole Foods was to restore and repair the old house. The work, however, has been postponed till now.


    The 1873 building was designed by William Fields & Son and housed the New York and Long Island Coignet Stone Company, which occupied five acres along the Gowanus Canal. In more recent history, it was home to the Pippin Radiator Company.

    The Coignet Stone Company building was landmarked in 2006 by the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission. You can read more about its history here.



    http://pardonmeforasking.blogspot.com/2011/02/coignet-stone-company-building-on-whole.html


  10. #40
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    ^glad it's saved and headed for better times.

    The Gowanus should be developed in an urban way. What's with all the sloping lawns and imitation suburbia in the renderings? Don't we have enough of that in New York now? and not enough waterfronts where you can do something like eat and drink and shop instead of just watching supermoms circle their prams on endless manicured lawns...or pale desperados engaging in sweaty no-swim sunbathing? How about some waterfront promenades with something going on. More like River Walk and less like an upstate SUNY college quad.

  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    Seriously. That's a plus (the only one?) about suburbs all over. Much better groceries than in the city.

    A bit unfair to us that we have to put up with the crappy Targets of the suburbs but, other than WholeFoods or Fairway (neither of which can hold a candle to the "normal" grocery stores you get in the burbs) we don't get any of the suburban food lovin'...
    At least whole foods put attention towards healthier eating rather than the junk you get in conventional stores. I live in suburbs and use Whole Foods.

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