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Thread: Manhattan West Project - Brookfield

  1. #271

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    The only risk that Brookfield is taking is if the site never becomes viable for development, in which case the platform would be a waste. If that happens, we might as well pack it in.

    But even the Related development of Hudson Yards will enhance the Manhattan West site, and if the Farley Annex is developed.

  2. #272

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoldanTTLB View Post
    Also, while the new plans show 3 towers, it's unclear how that would work about the rail yards. I feel like there's some confusion, that it will still be 2 with one of them going residential.
    There will be three towers, though four buildings, at least in Phase 1.

    The two office towers will face 9th Ave., and the other two buildings (the residential tower, which will have 850 units, and a retail pavillion), will be in the back, facing 450 W. 33 (which will be Phase 2).

    But the residential tower is likely the first to go up.

    And I don't think any of these buildings are structurally supported by the platform. The platform is just to create land and space at street level.

  3. #273

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Brookfield is building the platform first. It should keep them busy for a while. Besides allowing them to wait out the office market slump, a completed platform will make the site more attractive to prospective tenants.

    Platform construction video
    This is true, but the completion of the WTC transit hub should also be considered. Once finished--and by that point, 1 & 4 WTC will be done and 3 WTC will be rising--I think 2 WTC will be rented out quite quickly. I do believe that the rents being sought for 2 WTC & the Brookfield Towers are roughly comparable, so even with the platform complete, I would give the edge to 2 WTC. It also depends on whether companies are set on Midtown or Downtown, as I'm sure some are inflexible with their HQ location. Look at Coach--it's only moving two blocks from its current HQ. If Time Warner moves to the Hudson Yards, it'll be a little over a mile from Columbus Circle, which is not a big jump.

    I feel like the location of Brookfield's towers is actually worse than Related's. Related will basically have a private subway station for its new development. Sure, it'll be an extra stop from Penn, but that's not a big deal and it will undoubtedly be well-maintained. Their site is also carte-blanche; there's literally nothing there.

    Brookfield's, on the other hand, is sandwiched by the Farley Post Office and the imposing, formidable, and horribly heinous 450 W 33rd Street. Neither of its neighbors are particularly pedestrian-friendly, especially the Post Office; the side facing Ninth Avenue is all loading bays, and you have to dodge trucks as you walk along the sidewalk. I know they had new renderings of Moynihan released last year and it looked totally value-engineered. There must have been an airport built in the 90s for sale somewhere because it looked like that's where they got everything from. The new Moynihan Station is only intended as an expansion to the dreadful Penn anyways (on another note, the neighborhood surrounding Penn Station will only be nice when Penn Station & MSG are totally redeveloped. such a shame we missed out on that opportunity).

    Admittedly Related's towers will face 450 West 33rd, but they will be oriented towards the subway station so it's somewhat irrelevant. The street wall along 10th Avenue is actually going to be frightening come to think of it, the podium of the Related office towers + 450 W 33rd will create quite the canyon.

  4. #274

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    I don't see how Brookfield will attract tenants for a 2m square foot tower. Anyway, these buildings suck, so I hope they're not built any time soon.

  5. #275
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post

    I feel like the location of Brookfield's towers is actually worse than Related's. Related will basically have a private subway station for its new development. Sure, it'll be an extra stop from Penn, but that's not a big deal and it will undoubtedly be well-maintained. Their site is also carte-blanche; there's literally nothing there.
    That new station at Eleventh / 34th doesn't connect to Penn Station, unless you take the Eighth Avenue train up to 42nd and then switch to the 7 Line extension and take a ride. Probably talking 20-30 minutes to do that route.

    Hudson Yards will be a 10 minute walk from Penn. Manhattan West a mere 5 minute walk, and when Moynihan is built [if??] most of the walk can be done by interior passageways.

  6. #276
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Manhattan West’s Railyard-Spanning Platform Breaks Ground

    by Branden Klayko

    (click images to enlarge)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

    Manhattan’s far west side is about to become one of the busiest construction sites in the country. Last Tuesday morning, officials gathered at the corner of 9th Avenue and West 33rd Street to celebrate the second major groundbreaking in the Hudson Yards District, Brookfield Properties’ trio of new SOM-designed towers comprising the Manhattan West development to be built over a large rail yard serving Penn Station. The $4.5 billion project’s first phase, construction of the north portion of the railroad-spanning platform that will eventually support development, is now underway, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speculated that the second half of the platform could be underway in coming months. Excavation has been ongoing since the fall of 2012.


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

    “From Battery Park to Riverside Park, it’s just amazing how much development there has been all along the west side; an area everybody thought did not have the potential to become a hot neighborhood.” Bloomberg said. ”Manhattan West will be a prime location in which to live or work, a vital piece of the mixed-use community we’ve envisioned for the Hudson Yards area, which is beginning to take shape.” He noted the project’s proximity to Hudson River Park, the High Line and its cultural connections in Chelsea, and ease of access via Penn Station. Bloomberg was joined on stage by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, Port Authority’s Patrick Foye, Hudson Yards Development Corporation President Ann Weisbrod, Brookfield chairman John Zuccotti, and Brookfield executives Dennis Friedrich and Ric Clark.

    Bloomberg attributed the success of the west side to a 2005 rezoning of the Hudson Yards district and the 7-line subway extension. “Let me remind you,” he noted. “A subway line paid for by city dollars when the state wouldn’t come through.” He said over $6 billion has been invested in the area since 2005. Brookfield has owned the Manhattan West site since 1984, and Friedrich noted that the current economic conditions made it the right time to build.


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

    Twin office towers with retail space will anchor the corners of the site, each with two million square feet of office space, and a third residential building will be built along West 31st Street for a total of 5.4 million square feet of space. The cores of the office towers will be anchored in bedrock adjacent to the new platform and the residential tower will be built to the side of the rail yards, adjacent to the new platform.

    In addition to the three towers, Manhattan West also calls for a 100-foot-wide swatch of new public space between the office towers built on the new platform. High Line designers James Corner Field Operations will design the new 1.5-acre landscape, which is imagined as a recreated 32nd Street forming a pedestrian link with Hudson Yards and park amenities farther west. ”The open space at the center of the development will form a pedestrian-friendly link between those mass-transit hubs and Hudson Yards, the High Line, and the Hudson River Park,” Bloomberg said.
    The existing 16-story tower built in 1970 and already spanning the yards is also being redeveloped, and the Observer reports that Brooklyn-based firm REX will be handling the updates to the building, which, based on new renderings from Brookfield, includes a new facade. The structure was originally designed by Davis, Brody & Associates.

    Initial work includes building the northern platform over the west side rail yards, work that is expected to be complete by late 2014. Friedrich said office construction will start thereafter once financing is secured, remaining optimistic that initial tenants could be on site in the first tower by 2016. Financing for the $680 million deck is already in place with a $340 million construction loan. Brookfield is paying for the remaining $340 million.

    The deck consists of 16 prefabricated concrete bridge structures covering 60 percent of the five-acre Manhattan West site. ”Initially we planned a platform that involved a very elaborate system of structural steel down at the track level,” Friedrich said. “We challenged our engineering teams and they came up with a new plan called a ‘segmental precast bridge system,’” that minimizes the disruption to track levels, reduces costs, and speeds up construction time. A sample segment of the platform was on display, which Mayor Bloomberg and spectators signed after the ceremony. The large “launcher” that will set the platform pieces in place (see video above) is currently being fabricated off site.


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)


    Site of Manhattan West. (Branden Klayko / AN)


    Train tracks pass below 450 West 33rd Street. (Branden Klayko / AN)


    Site of Manhattan West. (Branden Klayko / AN)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)


    Manhattan West. (Courtesy Brookfield)

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/52940

    http://observer.com/2013/01/manhatta...y-twin-towers/

  7. #277

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    Quote Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 View Post
    This is true, but the completion of the WTC transit hub should also be considered. Once finished--and by that point, 1 & 4 WTC will be done and 3 WTC will be rising--I think 2 WTC will be rented out quite quickly. I do believe that the rents being sought for 2 WTC & the Brookfield Towers are roughly comparable, so even with the platform complete, I would give the edge to 2 WTC.
    You assume that 2WTC will be even be started this decade.

    It also depends on whether companies are set on Midtown or Downtown, as I'm sure some are inflexible with their HQ location. Look at Coach--it's only moving two blocks from its current HQ. If Time Warner moves to the Hudson Yards, it'll be a little over a mile from Columbus Circle, which is not a big jump.
    I don't see how any conclusions can be drawn as to whether a company will stay in its CBD. Conde Nast is moving headquarters from Midtown to 1WTC; and before the economic collapse, Merrill Lynch was contemplating moving from the WFC to a new tower at Hotel Pennsylvania.

    And some prospective tenants may not want to deal with the security issues at the WTC.

    I feel like the location of Brookfield's towers is actually worse than Related's. Related will basically have a private subway station for its new development.
    If the #7 line is going to accommodate everyone at Hudson Yards, the plan would collapse. Many will use NJ Transit, LIRR, and other subway lines to commute. They will need to get to Penn Station. I remember some of the Hudson Yards plans considered shuttle buses or light rail.

    Their site is also carte-blanche; there's literally nothing there.
    That's not generally an advantage. Office tenants usually prefer built neighborhoods.

    Neither of its neighbors are particularly pedestrian-friendly, especially the Post Office; the side facing Ninth Avenue is all loading bays, and you have to dodge trucks as you walk along the sidewalk.
    The Annex will be developed. There will probably be a pedestrian crossing at 9th Ave in line with 32nd St. The Annex is to have a central concourse.

    I don't see any clear advantage to either site, but you can't dismiss closeness to a major transportation hub as a big factor.

  8. #278
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Are we really still only proposed on this?


  9. #279
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    I guess people don't walk by here much, but they already have all kinds of footings and such in. presumably for the gantry crane to place the pretentioned concrete platform bits.


  10. #280

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    Brookfield's design sucks.

  11. #281
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    It's a bit boring.

  12. #282

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    I don't think anything we've seen is a serious design. Some older renderings by Archimation are here:

    http://www.gehrcken.de/?p=627


  13. #283

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    I forget, you can't expect much from Brookfield when it comes to extravagant designs.

  14. #284

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    I don't think anything we've seen is a serious design. Some older renderings by Archimation are here:

    http://www.gehrcken.de/?p=627

    Thanks, Derek. I assumed that the twin towers with beer bellies were the design since they''re on Brookfield's website.

  15. #285

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    You assume that 2WTC will be even be started this decade.
    I'm sure it will, it won't take that long to find tenants.

    I sure hope those twin office towers are not the final design for this. It sucks they got rid of the 1200+ footer.

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