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Thread: Manhattan West Project - Brookfield

  1. #16
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    The law of supply and demand says that. Midtown is in high demand, so the price increases accordingly. If the city allows enough apartments to be built to offset the high demand, then prices will finaly stabilize, or even drop a little. The only way to do that is to develop the underdeveloped regions, or to increase the density of the developed areas.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos
    The law of supply and demand says that. Midtown is in high demand, so the price increases accordingly. If the city allows enough apartments to be built to offset the high demand, then prices will finaly stabilize, or even drop a little. The only way to do that is to develop the underdeveloped regions, or to increase the density of the developed areas.
    Exactly. The supply in NYC is too low. Costs are too high. There are too many rent stabilized and controlled units. It artificially inflates rents. Unions their hands in too many pots in NYC. There was a story the other day, it costs about $150 per sq. ft. to build in NYC v. about $110 everywhere else. This needs to be dealt with, too.

    Build more, allow more comp, and prices will go down.

    As far as why shouldn't everyone be able to live in Midtown Manhattan...this isn't China. It's America. I can't live on Park Ave...oh well. Maybe one day I will be able to. I can't even get into this one. Too crazy to address, really. Sorry, I'm not being nasty, I just think it's a crazy thought.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ILUVNYC
    Anyone should be able to live in Midtown, no matter there financial situation. Midtown isnt only for upper class. Why should poorer people be designated to the outter boroughs?
    That's a noble thought, but you're going to have to explain a few things.

    First of all, are you just limiting yourself to Midtown, or do you mean anywhere in the city. If you can't afford Midtown, there are many places in the outer boroughs you can't afford either. Try living in Malba.

    Why do you say people are being designated to the outer boroughs? Do you regard it as a banishment? I'll make an educated guess that the majority of people in the outer boroughs don't want to live in Manhattan.

    Finally, how do you propose we accomplish this plan for equal access to Midtown?

  4. #19

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    1. No, I mean anywhere that is stated to be a "Rich" area. If you would like to live in a certain area I believe you should.

    2. The term designated comes by people thinking (No one in paticular) that Manhattan is only for the rich, and the outter boroughs are "poorer areas". I understand Zippy that this is not true. (D'town BK, Malba etc) That is a good guess as well, people choose where they what to live. If a person lives in East NY and wants to live in BK heights, he should. I dont regard it as banishment either, I love some areas in the outter boroughs.

    3.I think more affordable housing needs to be built.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILUVNYC
    1. No, I mean anywhere that is stated to be a "Rich" area. If you would like to live in a certain area I believe you should.

    2. The term designated comes by people thinking (No one in paticular) that Manhattan is only for the rich, and the outter boroughs are "poorer areas". I understand Zippy that this is not true. (D'town BK, Malba etc) That is a good guess as well, people choose where they what to live. If a person lives in East NY and wants to live in BK heights, he should. I dont regard it as banishment either, I love some areas in the outter boroughs.

    3.I think more affordable housing needs to be built.
    Now, what do you mean by "he should." No one says you can't live here or there, and areas aren't designated as "rich" but when people come to an area with money and prices are high, that eliminates people. That's life, really. Why would someone that can't afford a brownstone in BK be ENTITLED to live in one? I'm not sure if I follow.

    As far as outer borough banishment, keep in mind, for one reason or another, there are over 6.5 million people in NYC that do not live in
    Manhattan. I for one, love Manhattan, could afford to live there, but get so much more for my money 20 min away in Queens. It's not a banishment (and I'm not saying that you said it was either).

    More affordable housing should be built, and more for MIDDLE INCOME and for ARTISTS as well. Build in cheaper areas...build them up and make housing for people, too. While nice, I don't begrudge a developer paying $50 million for a plot of land trying to get the most money for his dollar. We all can't live on Park Ave.

  6. #21

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    No one is entitled to anything in life. I just think that if someone has a dream of living somewhere he or she may not be able to afford should. Its just me really, I like the affordable housing plan. Its just my opinion.

    I agree Billy, you DO get more in the other boroughs, some places are NICER even.

  7. #22
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    One thing confuses me... what exactly is "affordable" housing? Is there a particular style of apartment, or density of people? I know in simcity 4, when the "value" of a building goes down, the maximum number of occupants in that building goes up. Is this a factor in reality too? Or is affordable housing simply housing that someone who doesn't earn 6+ figures can afford to live in?

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by ILUVNYC
    Anyone should be able to live in Midtown, no matter there financial situation. Midtown isnt only for upper class. Why should poorer people be designated to the outter boroughs?
    That is the view that drives me up the wall. I happen to fall square in the upper middle class. With my income, I would be able to afford a really nice apartment in the hippest neighborhood in just about any american city. In New York, however, I cannot even afford to buy a smallish studio in one of the newer luxury developments.

    The question begs itself: what has a poor person done to deserve living in an apartment that I can't afford?

    If I can't afford an apartment in a certain area of the city, I look for an apartment elsewhere. I do NOT lobby to have a class of affordable apartments created especially for me, and granted to me by administrative fiat.

    I say, the hell with 80/20! Let's encourage developers to build so many luxury apartments that they create a glut in the market, and I can finally afford one!

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deimos
    One thing confuses me... what exactly is "affordable" housing? Is there a particular style of apartment, or density of people? I know in simcity 4, when the "value" of a building goes down, the maximum number of occupants in that building goes up. Is this a factor in reality too? Or is affordable housing simply housing that someone who doesn't earn 6+ figures can afford to live in?
    The term "affordable housing" as it has frequently been applied in the case of the 80/20 program is that the developer is obligated to rent out 20% of the newly constructed apartments at artificially low rates. By law, the apartments cannot be different in any way from the market-rate ones, and have to be dispersed throughout the building.

    In exchange for dedicating 20% of their apartments as "affordable housing," the developer receives construction financing from the city at extremely favorable rates (imagine a 30-year mortgage with a 2% interest rate).

    In effect, the taxpayers of the city of New York (those same people paying the market rates) are subsidizing the cheap loans, and by extension, the affordable housing.

  10. #25

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    I just think anyone who likes a certain neighborhood should be able to live there. Someone from Astoria who likes Midtown should be able to move there. Someone from Inwood should be able to move to College Point. JMO though.

  11. #26

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    There is a reason that, unlike the other two, it is worded the pursuit of happiness.

  12. #27
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    Ok going back to this project.... I cant quite picture the site. Is this going to be on top of the rail yards? between 9th and 10th? :?

    If it is, then that will be super cool!!! Something has to be built on top of those yards and is about time!!!

  13. #28

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    It's not over the railyards.

    North side of W 31st St, between 9th Ave and the Lincoln Tunnel access ramp. Close to 9th Ave - map shows 400 block starts on 9th. The Farley PO building is to the east across 9th Ave.

  14. #29

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    Most of the site is over railyards.
    Old statement from Brookfield...

    http://www.brookfieldus.com

    With the magnificent Farley Post Office building near Madison Square Garden soon to be redeveloped as the Amtrak portion of Pennsylvania Station, the surrounding neighborhood is poised to become one of Manhattans hottest commercial redevelopment spots.

    Brookfield is planning a 2.5 million square foot commercial building to be located at the southwest corner of Ninth Avenue and West 31st Street. The 130,000 square foot site, one of midtown Manhattans largest vacant parcels, is situated immediately across the street from the Farley Post Office building, one block away from Madison Square Garden and the existing Pennsylvania Station.

    Brookfield is currently preparing the architectural and engineering materials to apply for a decking permit over the existing 100,000 square foot below-grade railroad yard. It is expected that the permits and upzoning will be obtained by December 31, 2002, and that a building will be ready for occupancy by June 30, 2005.

  15. #30
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    I must apoligize, someone else posted under my name and said i would be not writing anymore. I am still in favor of more commercial space over residential on the West Side based on the fact NYC is loosing jobs left and right but have no control over what permits are given out.

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