Page 18 of 20 FirstFirst ... 814151617181920 LastLast
Results 256 to 270 of 291

Thread: Bars and Clubs - NYC Nightlife

  1. #256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SilverLiner View Post
    Hey guys :-) I'm off to New York in just over 3 weeks and wanted to ask about bars.

    A while ago I stumbled on a website about a bar very similar to the one in Coyote Ugly? Anyone know what it might have been? I know there is a bar called Coyote Ugly but it wasn't called that.

    I'm a big country fan and would love to find a country bar if there are any decent ones in Manhatten?

    Thanks :-)
    It's called Hogs & Heoffers
    Gotto the one in the Meat packing district, it's much cooler. If you have any questions let me know, I know the owner Michelle

  2. #257

    Default

    Urban Studies | Rooting

    Where Irish Eyes Hope to Smile Again

    Joe Fornabaio for The New York Times
    The tap is primed for a Knicks rebound at Tir Na Nog, an Irish pub near Madison Square Garden.

    By SAKI KNAFO
    Published: April 13, 2008

    FEW people have suffered more as a result of the monumental failures of the New York Knicks than the Irish. For years, the blocks surrounding Madison Square Garden have been strewn with Irish pubs — West Side joints, the old-timers might say — and when the Knicks are doing well, these Blarney Stones and Blarney Rocks do a brisk business.

    Lately, though, the Knicks have not been doing well.

    Tony Colbert, the Irish-born part owner of Tir Na Nog on Eighth Avenue near West 33rd Street, estimated that the bar’s Knicks crowd had declined by 60 percent as a result of the team’s struggles in the past five or six years.
    “It’s a shame like, you know,” he said in a heavy brogue at the wood-paneled pub.

    But it seems there is hope. Last week, amid talk of extensive renovations to the Garden itself, the Knicks announced that Donnie Walsh, a New York native and longtime executive for the Indiana Pacers, would be assuming control of the arena’s basketball operations. Thus ends an era in which the Knicks have been led — or, as many would say, led astray — by Isiah Thomas.

    Mr. Colbert was particularly warmed by the thought of a Knicks president with an Irish name. “Maybe he’ll get a little bit of luck of the Irish,” he said of Mr. Walsh.

    Mr. Colbert personally prefers rugby, soccer and Gaelic football to basketball. In the past year, he and his partners, Bill Harnett and Maurice Collins, have crossed the Atlantic four times to watch rugby matches featuring the team from Munster, the region where they grew up, or the Irish national team.
    Over the same period, Mr. Colbert has crossed West 33rd Street and Eighth Avenue for a Knicks game exactly twice.

    Before this year, he said, he made a point of seeing about six Knicks games a season. His first was in 1985. Predictably, he and his partners rooted for the Boston Celtics. “Because of the green,” he said.

    On Wednesday night, while the Knicks played across the street, two of the bar’s seven televisions were set to a basketball game between the New Jersey Nets and the Cleveland Cavaliers. The other televisions showed a hockey playoff opener: the New York Rangers versus the New Jersey Devils.

    The Knicks game, however, did supply the pub with some business that night.

    Perched at the bar were Ed Cunning, a 27-year-old publicist, and Tom Duggan, 28, a bond evaluator. Former roommates at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, the men had left the Garden at halftime.

    “The hockey game was a better game,” Mr. Duggan said.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times.

  3. #258

    Default

    4 A.M. Last Calls Could Be Headed The Way of Smoky Bars

    By CHRISTOPHER FAHERTY, Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 17, 2008

    City nightlife industry insiders fear that the days of 4 a.m. last calls are numbered.

    In most parts of Manhattan, bar and club owners say, it has become nearly impossible to open new nightlife establishments that are permitted to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. — the Prohibition-era curfew that is seen as a bedrock of New York City's party town identity.

    Community boards that now hold substantial clout with the New York State Liquor Authority are increasingly requesting that liquor licenses be tied to earlier closing times, often at or before 2 a.m., a number of advocates for the nightlife industry said.

    "It is a trend that has certainly increased in the last six months, and if it keeps increasing there are going to be serious problems for the nightlife industry and the city's economy," a lawyer for the New York Nightlife Association, Robert Bookman, said. An independent study conducted at the request of his association found that city nightlife establishments garner 58% of their revenues between the hours of 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., he said. Under state law, which says the closing time for bars in the city is 4 a.m., the liquor authority lacks the power to place stipulations on the operating hours of bars and clubs. However, if a bar owner agrees to limit its hours of operation with the local community board, the liquor authority will write it into the license.

    Community boards for years have provided the liquor authority with recommendations for liquor licenses, but only recently has their influence become a determining factor in designating them. "The new leadership that took over during the last few years of the Pataki administration has been dramatically more responsive to the community than any I've ever seen with many years of experience with the SLA, and I think that's a good thing," a state assemblyman who represents the Chelsea area of Manhattan, Richard Gottfried, said.

    A spokesman for the liquor authority, William Crowley, said the agency determines liquor licenses on a case-by-case basis and follows the letter of the law.

    Some say community boards are wielding their newfound power with the liquor authority to force bars to close earlier than ever before.

    "More and more of the community boards are insisting that bars close at 2 a.m. or earlier," Ben Leventhal, the editor in chief of Eater.com, a Web log that chronicles many of the liquor license issues arising in the city, said. "It's become the community boards' de facto bargaining chip."

    Matthew Piacentini, an entrepreneur poised to open a European-style parlor, said he decided to back out of plans to open the lounge in a commercial building on Hudson Street in TriBeCa after the community board stipulated he would have to close at midnight on weekdays and 1 a.m. on weekends. Mr. Piacentini pitched his establishment as an upscale anecdote to nightclubs for a clientele interested in having conversation. "If I could only be open for six hours there was no chance I could bring in the necessary revenue," he said.

    Brad Hoylman, the chairman of Community Board 2, which covers Greenwich Village and SoHo, said the board approves 90% of all liquor license applications, and 80% of those are tied to certain stipulations such as time constraints.

    "In our neighborhoods, most people don't want to live next to a nightlife establishment, he said. "What we try to do is be reasonable and have a fair negotiation with the applicant."

    Community Board 3, which covers the bar-saturated neighborhoods of the East Village and the Lower East Side, is widely described as the stingiest board in the city when it comes to obtaining a new liquor license. The board's district manager, Susan Stetzer, said her board doesn't stipulate closing times, but that the applicants themselves come to the board with their own closing times.

    According to minutes from the board's monthly meetings in November, December, and January, the most recent records available, not a single liquor license recommendation was granted to a bar that would close after 3 a.m. on weekends and 2 a.m. on weekdays.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Sun.

  4. #259

    Default Kenn's Broome Street Bar

    Kenn's Broome Street Bar, at 363 West Broadway.

    Does anyone know anything about this bar?

    It appeared to have an extensive menu, but I wasn't tempted in.

    I understand the building dates from 1825 but it did not look in a good condition.


  5. #260
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    I used to go there for its good 'locals' atmosphere but it morphed into something pricier and less fun.

  6. #261

    Default

    Urban Studies | Competing

    Where Everybody Knows Yao Ming

    Annie Tritt for The New York Times
    At Tropical 128, a bar in Little Italy, the Olympics are stirring more than the usual interest.

    By JOSEPH HUFF-HANNON
    Published: August 15, 2008

    IN the evenings, many of the mostly Chinese-American patrons of Tropical 128, a cavernous bar in Little Italy, walk past the fake Chinese fortune tree and gurgling fish tanks filled with baby sharks and dragon fish near the entrance. They head straight to the dimly lighted back room, there to hone their formidable skills at the nine pool tables and the snooker table in the corner.

    Interactive Schedule

    Follow the schedules of your favorite sports, day by day and event by event.

    Annie Tritt for The New York Times
    Tropical 128 is located on Elizabeth Street near Broome Street.

    Lately, though, Olympic fever has set in at Tropical 128, which is on Elizabeth Street near Broome Street and has been a magnet for young Asians from Chinatown and points beyond.

    For the past 10 days, all eyes have been transfixed by the images on the two flat-screen television sets atop the bar, where the Summer Games in Beijing have been broadcast nonstop. On Aug. 8, the night of the lavish opening ceremonies, the crowds were so large, they spilled out onto the sidewalk.

    The bar’s owner, Bill Guo, a boyish 35-year-old who grew up in a small town in southwestern China, decorated the space outside the bar with seven crisp white flags, emblazoned with the Olympic rings and the words “Beijing 2008.” Olympic flags flutter outside the squat, red-brick storefront.

    “I’m always crazy about the Olympics,” Mr. Guo said a few nights ago, perched on a bar stool. “But having them in Beijing, it makes me even happier. That’s why we put the flags up.”

    On Monday night, the banter between the bar’s patrons, most of them Asian, and the staff, which is largely Russian, seemed to keep pace with the action on the screen. Ksenia Nikitina, a Russian-born 21-year-old who has learned some Chinese in her nearly seven months as a bartender, expressed her firm belief that Russia would walk away from the Games with a handful of gold medals.

    Mr. Guo has his eye on China’s basketball team, particularly its towering superstar from the Houston Rockets, Yao Ming. “Of course you know who Yao Ming is,” he said to a visitor. “That’s China’s secret weapon.”

    Kevin Pan, a Hong Kong native who lives near Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, stopped in during happy hour to watch televised replays of the games, even though he’d been listening to updates and scores all day on the radio.

    During commercial breaks, Mr. Pan and his friend Kinfy Lee, a 31-year-old Chinese-born accountant, faced off against the Russian bartenders over rounds of Chinese dice.

    Five dice were rattled inside a leather cup, then slammed onto the bar.

    For Ms. Nikitina, the competition was unexpectedly soothing.

    “After working here, I can’t drink beer without playing dice, or without doing something competitive,” she said. “It just doesn’t seem natural.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/17/sp...ml?ref=thecity

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  7. #262

    Default

    September 10, 2008, 12:31 pm

    Bellying Up to the (New) Bar at ‘21’

    By Corey Kilgannon


    The old bar, before it was removed in August, at the “21″ Club. (Photo courtesy of the Demolition Depot)

    There are few entries in the annals of New York alcoholism to rival the bar at the “21” Club in Midtown Manhattan. The broad, mahogany bar stood since the 1940s in the center of the first floor. Drinks were had there by the likes of Humphrey Bogart and Ernest Hemingway.

    With its celebrity patrons and speakeasy heritage, it was the subject of paintings by artists like Leroy Neiman and immortalized in films, notably “The Sweet Smell of Success.

    But now in the celebrated dining room of “21,” which reopened this month at “21” West 52nd Street after renovation, there is only the sweet smell of shellac, given off by — egads — a sleek new bar, freshly varnished.
    It resembles the old bar, down to the brass foot rail, but there are differences. It is much narrower (about half as wide as the four-foot-wide old one), and shorter (by about 12 feet), leaving more space in the dining room for tables. And there are no spittoons.

    “No one really uses spittoons anymore,” said Bryan McGuire, the general manager of “21,” looking over the new bar last Friday. Also approaching extinction are the consistently large crowds of drinkers at the bar at “21,” whose owners say they plan to celebrate the establishment’s 80th birthday next year.

    “They used to make bars wider because there was more emphasis on beverages 30 years ago,” he said. “We don’t really get the shoulder-to-shoulder crowd at the bar anymore. You don’t get the three-martini lunch crowd like you did years ago.”

    It was between lunch and dinner at “21,” and the dining room was empty except for a man dressed in a tuxedo, sitting at a table filling out reservation forms.

    The man was Oreste Carnevali, who came to “21” in 1994 from the Four Seasons. In the lounge, all leather and oak, a party of four women drank Champagne and talked about their exercise regimens. Not exactly the stand-up, straight-up drinkers of yesteryear.

    Replacing the historic bar may seem unusual for a place like “21,” which clings tightly to its history. The brass plaques designating certain tables as belonging to certain patrons — for Bogart, Robert Benchley and Richard M. Nixon — still remain, as do all the mementos hanging from the ceiling donated by famous patrons.

    But as Mirko Blaskovic, a bartender at “21” for 16 years, pointed out, what is lost in historical authenticity is gained by increased efficiency and comfort. The new bar, he said, as he mixed drinks, was much more efficient, and more organized in the storage of ice, glasses, liquor and condiments. With a narrower bar, he no longer has to lean way over to slide a patron a drink.

    “The drinks taste the same,” he said.

    With all the modern touches of the new bar, it has a curious throwback to its predecessors: a hidden chute for the quick disposal of liquor bottles. It is hidden behind a wooden panel, and through it, the bartender can quickly dump bottles of booze to drop down a chute into the basement.

    This goes back to the establishment’s days operating as a speakeasy during Prohibition.

    The original bar, along the west wall, would sweep the liquor bottles down a chute toward the sewer system, at the touch of a button that could be operated by a lookout at the front door.

    The modern chute is not there to elude lawmen, but rather to facilitate recycling.

    “The bottles go into a recycle bin,” Mr. McGuire said. “This way, we’re keeping with our heritage and also being green-conscious.”

    The old bar was acquired by the Demolition Depot, whose owner, Evan Blum, said he would likely set a price of around $50,000. Mr. Blum said the bar was in storage at his warehouse in Middletown, Conn.

    He said he has handled the sales of many historic bars from New York City saloons and private homes, including the bar from the Artists and Writers Club and the bar from the original Lutèce restaurant. There was the one he recovered from a tavern on 32nd Street and sold to the Odeon and Sugar Ray Robinson’s personal bar, which now serves as the reception desk at the Middletown warehouse.

    In a way, Mr. Blum covers both ends of the saloon experience: he also specializes in bar urinals. He acquired several huge ones from P. J. Clarke’s and used them as models to create numerous replicas for that tavern’s franchises, he said. At his showroom on East 125th Street in Manhattan last week, he showed them off, pointing out “P. J. Clarke’s” stamped near the urinal handle into the thick, shiny glazed terra cotta.

    “I call them cathedral pissoirs,” he said, noting that their heft makes them seem almost ceremonial. Mr. Blum browsed the huge selection of urinals, including some prodigious ones that he said came from the horse stables of Jock Whitney. There were tall ones, he said, that came from New York City Department of Education offices.

    Mr. Blum continued a tour of the place, which was essentially a romp through artifacts of old New York. Along a staircase were railings from the Kenmore Theater in Brooklyn.

    He stepped outside, where a homeless man slept on marble columns laying on the sidewalk. Inside, there was a baby stroller next to an $8,000 antique tub. In it — the stroller, not the tub — a baby slept while his mother shopped, both seeming equally at bliss. Mr. Blum said he has sold artifacts to many celebrity clients. He said he sold a claw-foot tub to John Lennon for his apartment in the Dakota, and sold several items to George Harrison.

    Mr. Blum walked out the back door and descended an iron staircase taken from a city subway station. He pointed out some aluminum decorative panels that came from Kings County Hospital, and some streetlights from Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

    There was an old New York City park bench, and an old-fashioned street clock that once stood at 2 West 37th Street. There were railings from the Williamsburg Bridge sold by a scrap man, and pieces of the marble hallways from the Plaza Hotel. There were ornaments form the Commodore Theater in Brooklyn and marble archways from Mrs. Whitney’s apartment in Gracie Terrace.

    Inside, he pointed out some old wallpaper from the Gramercy Hotel, and a huge hanging lamp that once illuminated the office of Oscar Hammerstein, Mr. Blum said, before passing a door in the hallway with a window of frosted glass bearing the words: “Office of the Chancellor Joel I. Klein.”

    Of course, the “21” proprietors also gave a tour of their establishment, which included numerous historic aspects and artifacts, including the 5,000-pound cellar door disguised as a brick wall. It leads to the wine cellar, which was once used to hide alcohol and is still opened by inserting a meat skewer through a crack to pop the latch inside. Inside are wines that were stored there by Nixon, John Jay Astor, Burgess Meredith and other “21″ regulars.

    Phil Pratt, the wine director, used the skewer to pop open the vault and he showed me a bottle of Romanée Conti from 1985. It sells for $9,000, which he called a bargain price.

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...new-bar-at-21/

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  8. #263
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    East London England
    Posts
    2

    Default Bars & Clubs In New York

    Hey People,
    I just joint today, my name is James I'm 25 & i am from London UK, I'm going out to New York in January 5th - 11th, & just wanted to ask really what the scene is like on the Bars & Club front, a club / bar that plays your average commercial type of music, somewhere that people can recommend maybe from experience of going their or what they may have heard.

    Thanks, look froward to hearing some people's reply's

    JimmyC00

  9. #264

    Default bars and clubs

    James,
    manhattan is the place. lots of awesom bars out here... try 235th... it is the name of a rooftop bar... google it... also, i just got home from the Coffe Shop bar which is on 16th street....google it again.... and times square has innumerable bars... Touch is an alright club, Pacha is good again... 3 floors... different kind of music on each floor, Kemia is an Indian-English club if you're interested in dancing till you drop...

  10. #265

    Default

    There is already a thread covering this, look HERE

    MOD. EDIT - Thanks brianac, I just merged them together.
    Last edited by NYatKNIGHT; September 18th, 2008 at 04:57 PM. Reason: Merged threads

  11. #266
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    East London England
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thanks Shaarmin for the info i'll have a look into it, see what atracts my attention

  12. #267
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Downtown, Manhattan
    Posts
    38

    Default

    dont waste your time at Touch, you will be disappointed coming from London clubs, also go to Pacha in london its alot better IMO

  13. #268
    European Import KenNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Manhattan - BPC
    Posts
    774

    Default

    Not that I'm a huge fan of Touch really, but I like NY nightlife more than London, by far. It's a different type of nightlife for sure, more 'lounge oriented' (no unauthorized dancing, thank you!). Personally I got a thing for Cain, but each to their own.

  14. #269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    4 A.M. Last Calls Could Be Headed The Way of Smoky Bars

    By CHRISTOPHER FAHERTY, Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 17, 2008

    City nightlife industry insiders fear that the days of 4 a.m. last calls are numbered.

    In most parts of Manhattan, bar and club owners say, it has become nearly impossible to open new nightlife establishments that are permitted to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. — the Prohibition-era curfew that is seen as a bedrock of New York City's party town identity.

    Community boards that now hold substantial clout with the New York State Liquor Authority are increasingly requesting that liquor licenses be tied to earlier closing times, often at or before 2 a.m., a number of advocates for the nightlife industry said.

    "It is a trend that has certainly increased in the last six months, and if it keeps increasing there are going to be serious problems for the nightlife industry and the city's economy," a lawyer for the New York Nightlife Association, Robert Bookman, said. An independent study conducted at the request of his association found that city nightlife establishments garner 58% of their revenues between the hours of 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., he said. Under state law, which says the closing time for bars in the city is 4 a.m., the liquor authority lacks the power to place stipulations on the operating hours of bars and clubs. However, if a bar owner agrees to limit its hours of operation with the local community board, the liquor authority will write it into the license.

    Community boards for years have provided the liquor authority with recommendations for liquor licenses, but only recently has their influence become a determining factor in designating them. "The new leadership that took over during the last few years of the Pataki administration has been dramatically more responsive to the community than any I've ever seen with many years of experience with the SLA, and I think that's a good thing," a state assemblyman who represents the Chelsea area of Manhattan, Richard Gottfried, said.

    A spokesman for the liquor authority, William Crowley, said the agency determines liquor licenses on a case-by-case basis and follows the letter of the law.

    Some say community boards are wielding their newfound power with the liquor authority to force bars to close earlier than ever before.

    "More and more of the community boards are insisting that bars close at 2 a.m. or earlier," Ben Leventhal, the editor in chief of Eater.com, a Web log that chronicles many of the liquor license issues arising in the city, said. "It's become the community boards' de facto bargaining chip."

    Matthew Piacentini, an entrepreneur poised to open a European-style parlor, said he decided to back out of plans to open the lounge in a commercial building on Hudson Street in TriBeCa after the community board stipulated he would have to close at midnight on weekdays and 1 a.m. on weekends. Mr. Piacentini pitched his establishment as an upscale anecdote to nightclubs for a clientele interested in having conversation. "If I could only be open for six hours there was no chance I could bring in the necessary revenue," he said.

    Brad Hoylman, the chairman of Community Board 2, which covers Greenwich Village and SoHo, said the board approves 90% of all liquor license applications, and 80% of those are tied to certain stipulations such as time constraints.

    "In our neighborhoods, most people don't want to live next to a nightlife establishment, he said. "What we try to do is be reasonable and have a fair negotiation with the applicant."

    Community Board 3, which covers the bar-saturated neighborhoods of the East Village and the Lower East Side, is widely described as the stingiest board in the city when it comes to obtaining a new liquor license. The board's district manager, Susan Stetzer, said her board doesn't stipulate closing times, but that the applicants themselves come to the board with their own closing times.

    According to minutes from the board's monthly meetings in November, December, and January, the most recent records available, not a single liquor license recommendation was granted to a bar that would close after 3 a.m. on weekends and 2 a.m. on weekdays.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Sun.
    What is the actual situation about the closing time of the new bars / clubs in NYC ? I hope that it is better and that also the most of new bars and the new clubs have the LAST CALL at 4 AM.
    NEW YORK CITY : THE CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS !!!!!

  15. #270

    Default

    Well, I read on Sleep New York today (where I contribute) that we have nothing on the nightlife in London Towne.

    Watch the video posted here

Similar Threads

  1. Nightlife for Teens
    By stunt 101 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: August 2nd, 2005, 11:40 AM
  2. Theatres & Comedy Clubs & Questions
    By autorock in forum Questions and Answers about New York City
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: August 1st, 2005, 02:38 PM
  3. Clubs in NYC
    By drlikuid1444 in forum Questions and Answers about New York City
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: July 4th, 2005, 05:16 PM
  4. Comedy Clubs
    By rpcruzin in forum Questions and Answers about New York City
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 30th, 2004, 11:31 AM
  5. Clubs dancing into Chelsea - 6 establishments on same W. 27th
    By billyblancoNYC in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 11th, 2003, 11:17 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software