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Thread: GM + Apple = the Louvre?

  1. #16

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    This is one building that should never have been built. After Penn Station, the Park Savoy Hotel was NY´s greatest loss. At least they´re finally covering up that hole...

  2. #17

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    FAO Schwartz was closed, but reopened after renovations.

  3. #18
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    I think the greater FAO Schwartz chain is going out of business, but the store on 5th ave is profitable, so it was purchased and reopened by another holding company? I'm no reliable source on the matter.

  4. #19

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    does anybody have any recent pics of this?...it should be completed by now

  5. #20
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    its behind schedule, i talked to someone invovled, the cement strike effected it

  6. #21

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    They've begun the glass cube, we begin to get a sense of scale. How enormous that 32 foot glass cube is going to be.

  7. #22
    Architectural Padawan
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    http://www.appleinsider.com/article.php?id=1347

    Friday, October 28, 2005
    Glass cube assembly begins at site of 5th Ave flagship store

    By AppleInsider Staff

    Published: 03:00 PM EST
    Construction workers last week began to assemble a giant glass cube, which will be set like a jumbo gemstone atop Apple Computer's upcoming flagship retail store in the underground concourse of the General Motors building in Midtown Manhattan.

    On Thursday workers operating a crane could be seen lowering several glass panels into place in the middle of the plaza of the GM building at 767 Fifth Avenue, between 58th and 59th Street.

    When complete, the 32-foot glass cube will form a stunning gateway to a circular glass staircase and cylindrical elevator leading to an underground 25,000-square-foot Apple retail store.

    Apple will reportedly reserve a few thousand square-feet for storage and office space, reducing the usable retail space to about 21,000-square feet -- almost the equivalent to its SoHo flagship retail store, located in southern Manhattan.

    In a recent conference call, Apple for the first time acknowledged that it was constructing a giant retail store on 5th Ave. and said it hoped to begin operating out of the location in time for the holiday shopping season.

    Sources privy to Apple's plans previously told AppleInsider the 5th Ave. store would rival anything seen from the company's retail division so far.

    Apple reportedly began construction of the store in late-February.


  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I think the Apple cube is a great project, and I know that there were previous underground commercial uses below this plaza, but I'm curious ...

    When the GM building first went up was it granted a "zoning bonus" for the construction of a public amenity -- the the above-ground plaza -- that allowed additional floors / height?

    Or was the GM built to its full height "as of right"?

  9. #24

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    lofter, the idea was to populate the city with Seagram buildings. The plazas were thought to be the neatest thing since sliced bread. The result can be seen on 6th Avenue in the forties and fifties, and on Park Avenue.

    Occasionally the formula produced a work of art, as in the CBS Building or Seagram, but mostly it just proved once again that the magic is not in the numbers.

    That's the problem with zoning in general; it's paint by numbers.

    * * *

    The modernist idea was that a building was sculpture, so to fully appreciate it as sculpture you had to be able to see it from all sides. That meant being able to walk substantially all the way around it; hence the plazas.

    The street? Modernism hated streets, because they were lined with buildings that defined space rather than being objects of sculpture. Corbu reigned supreme; dissolve the streetwall.

    The irony of it is that when all the buildings are set back on plazas, as on Sixth Avenue, they inadvertently form a streetwall of sorts anyway. But it's gigantic, so it's OK. Corbu and the modernists liked things to be big and wanted to give you the opportunity to fully drink in their bigness.

    It's easy to see the Apple cube as a continuation of that tradition.
    Last edited by ablarc; October 29th, 2005 at 11:46 PM.

  10. #25

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    Ducking to get out of the way of the photog?

    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order
    I also want to know what the guy is doing in the lower left of the picture. I was looking at him, then I realized the question mark. I thought he was spitting in the trashcan, but then I just had no idea.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Law & Order
    I also want to know what the guy is doing in the lower left of the picture.
    Based on the picture below, he appears to be looking at a newspaper in a vending machine.


  12. #27
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    Looks like someone kicked him in the nads.

  13. #28

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    It's kind of got a Mecca look going on right now.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaaba

  14. #29

    Default apple of my eye

    I look forward to seeing this place. I think the store in Soho is one of the finest interios I have ever seen. Lets see if they can out do themselves with the interiors; there off to a good start with the exterior "cube" concept.

    cheers

  15. #30

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    Intelligencer

    Steve Jobs Loves his Big iCube

    It’s his; he’s not leaving it here.

    By Deborah Schoeneman

    The long-awaited deal for Apple’s sprawling subterranean store in the GM building was recently finalized—but only after landlord Harry Macklowe promised Steve Jobs he could take his big $9 million glass cube with him at the end of the lease. Techno aesthete Jobs personally designed the 32-foot-by-32-foot box that will mark the store’s entrance on the Fifth Avenue plaza (formerly home to a T.G.I.Friday’s). “Steve Jobs felt that he created the cube so he owned it,” says Apple broker Robert Futterman, noting that Macklowe wanted it to stay put. “At the eleventh hour, that was the biggest issue.” Macklowe had aggressively wooed Jobs, flying out to California twice and offering well below market rent of $1,000 per square foot for the 24,000-square-foot store set to open in the spring. At the end of the twenty-year lease, Jobs must replace the cube with a comparable structure before hauling it off. Apple didn’t return calls, and Macklowe declined to comment.



    Jobs should drop dead on Nov 29th 2025.

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