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Thread: Clinton Hill Development

  1. #91
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    Very unusual and a treasure.


    Building of the Day: 20-30 Gates Avenue


    Royal Castle Apartments. Corner of Gates and Clinton. Clinton Hill. Wortmann and Braun, architects. 1912.









    Address: 20-30 Gates Avenue, at Clinton Ave.
    Name: The Royal Castle Apartments
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill (Clinton Hill Historic District, individual landmark 1981)
    Year Built: 1911-1912
    Architectural Style: Beaux Arts
    Architects: Wortmann and Braun

    Why chosen: Built when “the Hill” was synonymous with fine living, this over the top, ornate building is a rare example of both Beaux Arts style and Austrian Sezessionist-style ornament. The stylized figures of stone masons holding up the ledges, the grotesques adorning the top floors, and the shape of the roofline would be at home in Vienna, and in many ways are real-life inspirations for moody set designs like those in movies Batman and The Dark Knight. A wonderful, unique, and eclectic Brooklyn building. GMAP

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...g_of_the_1.php

  2. #92
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    Lots of variety in CH .


    Building of the Day: 284 Clinton Avenue



    Address: 284 Clinton Avenue, between DeKalb and Willoughby
    Name: Former William W. Crane House
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill (Clinton Hill Historic District)
    Year Built: 1854
    Architectural Style: Gothic Revival, with façade re-shingled around 1884.
    Architect: Unknown
    Landmarked: Yes

    Why chosen: Built when Clinton Hill was a suburban retreat, this classic Gothic Revival villa is a rare gem, both for its style, and for its remarkable good condition. Note the Gothic details on the fence, porch, and in the bargeboard over the entryway. The house was built for fancy goods dealer William W. Crane, and was probably modernized by new owner, oilman Richard J. Chard, in 1884. By this time, Clinton Hill was a very posh neighborhood, and the new shingles echo the upscale Shingle Style houses being built at this time. Originally, the grounds for the house extended to DeKalb Avenue. GMAP

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...g_of_the_9.php

  3. #93
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    Walkabout: William B. Tubby, architect

    by Montrose Morris


    Charles Millard Pratt Mansion, 241 Clinton Avenue, Clinton Hill, 1893


    179 - 183 St. James Place, Clinton Hill, 1892


    Charles Adolf Scheiren Mansion, 405 Clinton Ave, Clinton Hill, 1889


    (click to enlarge)

    Article at Brownstoner

  4. #94
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    Building of the Day: 67 Putnam Avenue


    Lincoln Club, now Independent Mechanics Headquarters. Putnam St, between Irving Place and Classon. Rudolph Daus, architect. 1889.




    Lincoln Club insignia once again, this time as a band of terra-cotta trim running across the third story, under the dormers.


    Heavy French Renaissance inspired terra-cotta trim on turret.



    Address: 67 Putnam Avenue, between Irving Place and Classon Avenue
    Name: Originally the Lincoln Club, now Independent Order of Mechanics of the Western Hemisphere
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill
    Year Built: 1889
    Architectural Style: Queen Anne
    Architect: Rudolph Daus
    Landmarked: Yes (Individual landmark, 1981)

    Why chosen: The Lincoln Club was founded in 1878 by prominant Clinton Hill residents for the purposing of having a social club, and to promote Republican causes. By the time this building was built, they had ceased to be a political club, and were, like other clubs such as the Montauk, a social outlet for upscale men in the neighborhood. It originally had bowling alleys in the basement, and other club rooms for meetings, meals and activities. Daus was a well respected architect, having designed, among other builldings, the 13th Regiment Armory on Sumner Avenue in nearby Bedford Stuyvesant. This is regarded as one of his finest buildings, and is an exemplary example of urban Queen Anne architecture, with multiple materials used; brownstone, terra cotta, brick, and stained glass, along with the multitude of features; turrets and tower, gables, oriels, columns, parapets, fanciful windows and a multitude of wonderful terra-cotta ornament, including dragons, floral bands, and the organization's crest and date of the building. The Club disbanded in 1931, and the building passed to the Independent Order of Mechanics, a Masonic organization, in the 1940's. A paint job has obscured the colors in the original materials, and there have been some other minor alterations, but the building remains pretty much intact, and is a visual treat on Putnam Avenue.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston..._of_the_65.php

  5. #95
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    Looks like a very unconvincing cardboard movie set (not unlike this, too) IMO.


    Waverly Associated Build-Out Revealed



    A few years ago we wrote about the development planned above the Waverly Ave. Associated Supermarket, and this is the rendering that was submitted to the Landmarks Preservation Committee for apartment additions. Looks like the Associated will stay completely in tact, and that the development above blends pretty nicely into the neighboring brownstone. Early May was the fourth hearing the development group had with the Landmarks Committee since 2008, but it looks like the design still hasn't been approved. What do you think?

    Development Planned Above Waverly Associated [Brownstoner] GMAP

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...opment_ren.php

  6. #96
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    That won't pass muster at LPC. The windows will have to be re-done, particularly in the two segments at the far left. And they'll no doubt try to get a contrasting cornice.

  7. #97
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    Building of the Day: 278 Clinton Avenue


    278 Clinton Ave, between DeKalb and Willoughby Ave. Clinton Hill. 1884.
    Architect unknown.



    Address: 278 Clinton Avenue, between DeKalb and Willoughby
    Name: Private House
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill (Clinton Hill Historic District)
    Year Built: 1884, approximately
    Architectural Style: Queen Anne, with Neo-Grec elements
    Architects: Unknown
    Landmarked: Yes

    Why chosen:
    The 1981 LPC designation report for Clinton Hill calls this house “surely the most eccentric house in the historic district and is, unfortunately, one of the major houses for which historical information is unavailable.” It really is some house. It's next door to the grounds of the wood frame Queen Anne at 284, which affords even more curb appeal, and the expansive foliage softens the edges of this large mansion, surrounded by an ornate wrought iron fence. Then there's that unusual corner bay, which juts out like a castle turret, with a sturdy balcony held up with carved stone brackets. The whole house, which is quite large, projects a massive sturdiness, from the use of the contrasting red brick and white limestone, to the large porch and upper balcony on the front of the building. A photo of the beveled glass side window, shot in winter without foliage, shows the delicacy of form amidst the massive columns, brackets and cornice, as does the intricate brickwork.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston..._of_the_69.php

  8. #98
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    Building of the Day: 184-194 Lefferts Place



    Address: 194-194 Lefferts Place
    Name: Row Houses
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill
    Year Built: 1886
    Architectural Style: Queen Anne
    Architect: Mercein Thomas
    Landmarked: No, but part of the proposed CH South extension, and on the National Register for Historic Places.

    Why chosen:
    Like the identical rows of Italianates on streets like South Oxford or Vanderbilt, this row of Queen Anne’s with identical second floor oriel bays, has a pleasing symmetry that draws the eye down the block. Subtly ironic, as Queen Anne architecture is the quintessential individualistic style. The adjoining group, 174-182, much less ornate, was designed by Thomas as well, and was built a year later, in 1887. Despite the loss of some of the detail, and benign neglect, these are still extremely attractive houses.

    This part of Clinton Hill has long been the neglected stepchild, but is slowly getting the recognition and gradual tender loving care it deserves. There is some fantastic architecture here. Mercein Thomas was a hard working architect whose name pops up in much of brownstone Brooklyn. A lot of his work is in Clinton Hill, with houses on Cambridge Place, Clinton Avenue, Washington Avenue, and St. James Place. Most of it dates between 1884 and 1893. He designed the Carlton Club on 6th Avenue and St. Marks, in Park Slope. He was a more than able practitioner of the Romanesque Revival/Queen Anne style, although two of his best, 463-465 Clinton, on the corner of gates, are Beaux-Arts style limestones.

    Thomas and his wife lived on Cumberland Street, in Fort Greene, and were very active in charity work. He designed orphanages and hospitals, and sat on their boards. In 1889, he was asked to design a large building to house aging senior men of the Methodist Church. The result was the large complex called the Methodist Home, on New York Avenue, between Prospect and Park Places. He designed the central tower part of the building first, and over the years, more wings and a chapel were added. This complex is one of the only remaining charitable institutions that still remain in the neighborhood. Mercein Thomas donated his design and plans, and took no financial remuneration. Sounds like a good guy.

    Speaking of good guys, thanks to a reader,” New Guy”, who commented on my Lefferts Place piece last week, and sent me a copy of the National Register of Historic Places report for this neighborhood, called Clinton Hill South. It was a fascinating report, complete with many familiar architects’ names and dates. I now have a wealth of information on a part of town I’ve always loved. Thank you, so much, New Guy!





    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...of_the_232.php

  9. #99
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    Past and Present: Clinton Ave. at Lafayette



    The latter quarter of the 19th century saw Clinton Hill grow to be one of the most exclusive and expensive communities in Brooklyn. Clinton Avenue was the premiere street to be on, and large free-standing and rowhouse mansions lined both sides of the street.

    In the photograph on the left, there is a large house on the corner with a generous side yard. To the left of it, the house next door, #321, the James Lounsbery House(1874), still stands, as does # 315 Clinton, the 1888 Arbuckle House, the one with the fourth floor dormer.

    In 1940, when this photograph was taken, the city was getting ready to tear down the corner house to make way for one of the five apartment towers that make up this portion of the housing built for the Navy personnel working at the nearby Navy Yard during World War II. These houses, on the south side of the complex, were for officers and their families. The enlisted men lived in the buildings further north on Willoughby. The complex was built in 1942, and was turned into affordable co-ops after the war. Today, these are the Clinton Hill Co-ops, still known for their comfortable sized apartments, and well-maintained buildings.





    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...d_presen_4.php

  10. #100
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    Building of the Day: 463 Clinton Avenue



    Name: former Morgan Bogart house
    Address: 463 Clinton Avenue
    Cross Streets: Greene and Gates Avenue
    Neighborhood: Clinton Hill
    Year Built: 1902
    Architectural Style: Beaux-Arts
    Architect: Mercein Thomas
    Other Buildings by Architect: in Clinton Hill: 407-409 Washington Avenue, 400-404 Washington Avenue, Methodist Home for the Aged, Park Place, Crown Heights North.
    Landmarked: Yes, part of Clinton Hill HD (1981)

    The story: This beautiful limestone house puts the Beaux in Beaux-Arts. It’s considered to be the finest example of Beaux –Arts residential architecture in Brooklyn. Yep, beats out any contenders in Park Slope or the Heights. The house and its very different next door neighbor were designed by Brooklyn architect Mercein Thomas, who designed quite a few houses of very varying styles here in Clinton Hill and elsewhere in Brooklyn. The house is highly reminiscent of the mansions on the Upper East Side, near 5th Avenue. It’s a classic, with wide sweeping stairs, leading to an elegant entryway. The door is a replacement, but doesn’t mar the general grandeur of the house. This leads the eye upward to the second floor oriel, almost the width of the house, supported by an elaborate bracket system of Corinthian columns, and decorative carved cartouches.

    The bowed oriel has three curved windows, all surrounded by pilasters, columns, dentil and egg and dart moulding, and topped by stained glass transoms. The oriel has a decorative balcony, and above that, twin windows with the same trim and stained glass. Elegant two story pilasters flank the windows, leading the eye up to the final piece of elegance: the handsome dentil detail of the cornice.

    The house was built for Morgan L. Bogart, a Civil War veteran and Adjutant General of the Union Veteran League of the United States. He was also a proofreader at the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

    Oddly enough, he never lived here. When the house was completed, his son, a doctor named J. Bion Bogart moved in, and lived here until 1926. Dr. Bogart was a surgeon at Methodist Hospital and at Kings County Hospital. The Bogart’s were active in the social and charitable scene in Brooklyn, and Dr. Bogart was noted in the papers as an eminent surgeon.

    But even eminent surgeons can have accidents. The New York Times reported in 1912 that Dr. Bogart was suffering from a critical case of septic poisoning, contracted through a small cut on his finger the week before while performing surgery. The infection spread to his shoulder, neck and then chest muscles. Doctors, including his brother, Arthur H. Bogart, were uncertain of his recovery, but upon further investigation, he seems he pulled through. He is listed in medical entries in 1918, and in the census of 1930, a 70 year old man living now in Brooklyn Heights.

    Mercein Thomas, the architect of this, and the adjoining corner house, is well known in this part of Brooklyn. His buildings include 407-409 Washington Avenue, as well as 400-404 Washington Avenue, a former BOTD. These, and his iconic Methodist Home for the Aged, on Park Place in Crown Heights North, are all brick and brownstone Queen Anne buildings. These two Beaux-Arts limestones show his mastery of this new and quite different style, proving the man really knew his stuff.



    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2011...e/?stream=true

  11. #101
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    10/15/11

    Myrtle Hall, Pratt Institute

    Myrtle Avenue





    South side









    Atrium





    Campus model




    This is across Myrtle Avenue


  12. #102

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    I hope he wins the fight. This building has got to be saved.

    Condos planned for Broken Angel building as old owner continues fight


    Artist Arthur Wood has moved to the Hudson Valley city of Beacon but still dreams of reclaiming the Clinton Hill house. The new owner, Barrett Design and Development, paid $4.1 million for the property.


    By Doyle Murphy / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Thursday, February 13, 2014, 2:00 AM



    Fevelo Nicholas/Freelance NYDN

    The Broken Angel building, shown in 2006, became a Brooklyn landmark through years of tinkering by its eccentric former owner, artist Arthur Wood.



    LOOK upstate, Angel.
    Cast out of Broken Angel, his Brooklyn Paradise, artist Arthur Wood is now fighting from his adopted Hudson Valley home to stop a developer from moving forward with plans to convert his Downing Street art project into luxury condos.
    “I haven’t lost,” Woods said Wednesday from his home in Beacon, where he now runs a small studio and gallery. “I’m preparing to go to Washington as soon as I’m notified.”

    For more than three decades, Wood, 82, lived in the four-story Downing St. structure, all the while creating a landmark of metal, glass and mirrors that was featured in a 2005 documentary featuring the comedian Dave Chappelle.
    But after a fire that led to numerous building violations, Wood was forced to default on a mortgage. He lost the asset in a hotly contested foreclosure and was evicted last May.

    RELATED: BROKEN ANGEL ARTIST OWNER COULD BE EVICTED


    Artist Arthur Wood in 2013 before he was evicted from home, Broken Angel, in Clinton Hill.


    “They took all of my property,” said Wood of city marshalls who evicted him. “They didn’t allow me to pick it up.”
    Wood has since opened a small studio and gallery, named Art Works, in Beacon, about 65 miles north of Manhattan. He’s lent decades of his work to another Beacon arts space, Bau Gallery, for a retrospective running through March 2.

    But even as life moves forward in Beacon, Wood said he dreams of taking back his old home, which he moved into in 1979 when it was the former Brooklyn Trolley headquarters.
    Last month, Wood wrote to the new owner, Alex Barrett of Barrett Design and Development, advising him not to gamble his money on renovations to the building.
    “He runs a very high risk of losing the building to me,” said Wood, who claimed he would soon be taking his long-running real estate battle to the U.S. Supreme Court.

    RELATED: MOVIEMAKER SUES TO REEL IN FOOTAGE OF ANGEL BUILDING
    Artist Arthur Wood relocated to the Hudson Valley city of Beacon after he was evicted from Broken Angel in the Clinton Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn.


    Barrett, an architect and developer, declined to comment on Wood but said they’re drawing up plans for condos now.
    The firm closed a $4.1 million deal two weeks ago for the house and an adjacent lot. The house will be converted into eight condos, all built upon the framing and elevator work Wood began during his failed bid to create his own condos.
    Meanwhile, a new, four-story, two-unit condo building will rise on the same lot, Barrett said.

    He hopes to restore the 140-year-old building’s understated charm, which he says was obscured during Wood’s tenure.
    “We’re interested in the history of the building,” said Barrett, who expects to finish renovations this year and complete it in 2015. “We’re not trying to whitewash that, but we are cognizant that we are writing a new chapter.”



    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...#ixzz2tCydzScl

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