Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 86

Thread: North Korea - Nuclear Weapons

  1. #1

    Default North Korea - Nuclear Weapons

    February 10, 2005

    North Korea Says It Has Nuclear Weapons and Rejects Talks

    By JAMES BROOKE

    OKYO, Feb. 10 - In a surprising admission, North Korea's hard-line Communist government declared publicly for the first time today that it has nuclear weapons. It also said that it will boycott United States-sponsored regional talks designed to end its nuclear program, according to a North Korean Foreign Ministry statement transmitted today by the reclusive nation's wire service.

    Pyongyang said it has "manufactured nukes for self-defense to cope with the Bush administration's undisguised policy to isolate and stifle" North Korea, and that it will "bolster its nuclear weapons arsenal."

    The statement, considered a definitive policy pronouncement, said that North Korea is pulling out of the talks after concluding that the second Bush administration would pursue the "brazen-faced, double-dealing tactics" of dialogue and "regime change."

    Four hours before the official Korean Central News Agency transmitted the pullout statement, a top Bush administration official told reporters here that North Korea's return to the nuclear talks was expected by all other participants the United States, Japan, South Korea, Russia and China.

    "The onus is really on North Korea," said John R. Bolton, undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, noting that the last time the parties met was in June.

    Referring to North Korea's bomb making capability, he added: "The absence of progress in six-party talks means they are making further progress toward their increased capability."

    It is unclear if North Korea is definitively slamming the door to talks or merely trying to raise its price for returning to the bargaining table.

    "We are compelled to suspend our participation in the talks for an indefinite period," the statement said, adding that North Korea would only return when "there are ample conditions and atmosphere to expect positive results from the talks."

    From Europe, Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice told RTL television of Luxembourg: "The North Koreans should reassess this and try to end their own isolation." A similar appeal came from Japan, America's closest ally in the region.

    "It's better to resume them early," Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told reporters about North Korea's decision to boycott the talks. "It would be in North Korea's interest to make use of the six-party forum."

    Overall, the statement was a bucket of cold water for analysts who predicted a resumption of talks this spring. Two groups of American congressmen returned last month from visits to Pyongyang with reports that North Korean officials were hinting at an imminent return to the negotiating table.

    President Bush, in his State of the Union message last week, avoided the confrontational rhetoric of past speeches in which he branded North Korea as member of "the axis of evil," alongside Iraq and Iran. This time, in his only reference to Pyongyang, he merely said that he was "working with governments in Asia to convince North Korea to abandon its nuclear ambitions."

    But in today's statement, Pyongyang zeroed in on Dr. Rice's testimony last month in her Senate confirmation hearings, where she lumped North Korea with five other dictatorships, calling them "outposts of tyranny."

    "The true intention of the second-term Bush administration is not only to further its policy to isolate and stifle the D.P.R.K. pursued by the first-term office, but to escalate it," the statement said, referring to North Korea by its formal name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    Outside critics and defectors say that North Korea is neither democratic nor popular, since it has been ruled for the last 60 years by the Kim family, an avaricious clan that does not permit multiparty elections or the slightest whisper of dissent. Today Pyongyang told the Bush administration to talk to the kinds of North Koreans it likes.

    "We advise the U.S. to negotiate with dealers in peasant markets it claims that are to its liking or with representatives of the organization of North Korean defectors on its payroll, if it wishes to have talks," the statement said.

    In the same statement, North Korea also attacked Japan for "toeing the U.S. line." Tokyo has been struggling with mounting popular pressure for economic sanctions. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Koizumi personally received a petition calling for sanctions, signed by five million people.

    Japanese anger with North Korea rose sharply last month after Pyong- yang delivered to visiting Japanese dip- lomats two boxes of half-cremated re- mains, said to be of a Japanese woman kidnapped from Japan by North Korean agents in the 1970s. DNA analysis showed that the remains were not of the missing Japanese woman, but of two unidentified people. It is unclear if North Korea, which tightly controls in- formation from the outside world, was aware of DNA technology. Its state- ment today charged that Japan had "fabricated the issue of false re- mains over the abduction issue."

    Conservative Japanese increasingly say Mr. Koizumi should call the bluff of what they say is a bankrupt state that routinely hides behind scary bluster.

    "At first, we should make economic sanctions," Shintaro Ishihara, Tokyo's conservative governor said in an interview this afternoon, just before North Korea's nuclear weapons vow was made public.

    "At the second stage, let them bomb Japan with that nasty missile," Mr. Ishihara taunted with sarcasm in his voice as he spoke in his office, in Tokyo's tallest building. "Their missile cannot load a nuclear warhead." Asked what Japan would do in response to a missile attack, Mr. Ishihara merely smiled.

    The United States has said that North Korea has up to eight nuclear bombs. But, it has never exploded a nuclear device.

    One year ago, Siegfried Hecker, a former director of the nuclear weapons laboratory in Los Alamos, N.M., toured Yongbyon, North Korea's main known nuclear facility. Although North Korea apparently organized the visit to persuade Americans of their nuclear weapons prowess, Dr. Hecker returned home saying that he was not convinced North Korea could build a working nuclear bomb and mount it on a missile.

    Half a century after the Korean War, North Korea has not signed a formal peace treaty with South Korea and its main ally, the United States. In September 1991, in an effort to denuclearize the divided peninsula, President George H..W. Bush announced the withdrawal of all American tactical weapons from South Korea, totaling about 100. In December 1991, both Koreas signed a formal agreement pledging not to produce, test or store nuclear weapons.

    Over the next decade, South Korea conducted what now appear to be several minor, disconnected experiments in technology related to nuclear weapons. North Korea agreed to seal a plutonium-based nuclear program. But in 2002, an American official confronted Pyongyang with evidence that it had been cheating on its nuclear promises, maintaining a covert uranium enrichment program.

    In response, North Korea expelled international inspectors from Yongbyon, announced that it was quitting the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and said it was building up what it ambiguously called its "nuclear deterrent." The six-nation disarmament talks started in Beijing in August 2003, but have not yielded any tangible results.


    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

  2. #2

    Default

    CNN
    September 19, 2005

    N. Korea agrees to give up nuclear program

    Joint statement calls for security, energy assurances

    BEIJING, China (CNN) -- Nearly three years after ordering U.N. nuclear inspectors out of the country, North Korea Monday agreed to give up its entire nuclear program, including weapons, a joint statement from six-party nuclear arms talks in Beijing said.

    "This is the most important result since the six-party talks started more than two years ago," said Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Wu Dawei, Beijing's envoy, in a report from The Associated Press.

    In exchange, the United States, China, Japan, Russia and South Korea have "stated their willingness" to provide energy assistance to North Korea, as well as promote economic cooperation.

    "The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) is committed to abandoning all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs and returning at an early date to the treaty on the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons (NPT) and to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards," the statement said.

    The World Food Program has said that North Korea is headed toward the worst humanitarian food crisis since the mid 1990s, when an estimated 1 million North Koreans died. WFP says 6.5 million North Koreans desperately need food aid.

    Earlier Monday, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said the talks were in their "endgame."

    The breakthrough agreement came on what was the seventh day of the fourth round of six-party talks.

    A new round of talks has been scheduled for November. Chief U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill warned that the North Korean disarmament talks could still be a long process, according to a report from The Associated Press.

    Prior to the deal, North Korea clung to its position of maintaining a civilian nuclear program, while Washington wanted Pyongyang to forego all nuclear programs.

    The negotiations had been deadlocked over North Korea's demand that it keep the right to civilian nuclear programs after it disarms, according to an AP report.

    While the joint statement has Pyongyang giving up nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs, it also acknowledges that North Korea has stated that it has the the right to "peaceful uses of nuclear energy" and that the provision of a nuclear light-water reactor will be discussed at "an appropriate time."

    The joint statement also includes a pledge that Pyongyang and Washington will "respect each other's sovereignty, exist peacefully together and take steps to normalize their relations" -- a considerable change in the tone in relations between the nations.

    In his 2002 State of the Union Address, U.S. President George Bush called North Korea, Iran and Iraq an "axis of evil" that is "arming to threaten the peace of the world." As recently as July, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice called North Korea one of six "outposts of tyranny."

    In Monday's statement, "the United States affirmed that is has no nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula and has no intention to attack or invade the DPRK with nuclear or conventional weapons," fulfilling North Korea's desire for a security pledge from the United States.

    In a rare interview with CNN in the North Korean capital last month, North Korea's Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gye Kwan said Pyongyang wanted to pursue a peaceful nuclear program and was willing to adopt "strict supervision" of its nuclear facilities.

    Pyongyang ordered U.N. nuclear inspectors out of the country in December 2002, and pulled out of the NPT the following month.

    "If someone is concerned with regard to our possible nuclear activities which could lead up to the manufacture of nuclear weapons out of the operations of a light-water nuclear reactor, then we can leave the operations under strict supervision," Kim said, offering to allow the United States a role in monitoring.

    "We would like to pursue peaceful nuclear energy power generation and this is a quite urgent issue that faces our nation," he said.

    "And this is a very appropriate policy in light of the economic situation of our country. That is why we cannot make a concession in this field."

    CNN's Stan Grant contributed to this report.

    © 2005 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.

  3. #3
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    "We give up!"

    "Where is our aid?"

  4. #4
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,298

    Default

    Sing it with me, fellas.

    "How do you solve a problem like Korea...?"

  5. #5
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    North Korea Appears Set to Launch Missile

    By HELENE COOPER
    June 18, 2006
    NY TIMES

    WASHINGTON, June 18 — North Korea appears to have completed fueling of an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the United States, American officials said today, a move that greatly increases the probability that Pyongyang will actually go ahead with a launch.

    After analyzing satellite images, American officials said they believed that booster rockets were loaded onto a launch pad and fuel tanks fitted to a missile at a site in North Korea's remote east coast. Fueling a missile is generally considered close to an irreversible step, since it is very hard to siphon fuel back out.

    The fueling set off a flurry of diplomatic activity over the weekend, as officials from the United States, Japan and China worked furiously to try to forestall a launch. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice spoke to her Japanese and Chinese counterparts, urging the Chinese, in particular, to try to pressure North Korea against firing its Taepodong 2 missile.

    Demonstrating how seriously they consider this matter, officials at the State Department telephoned North Korean diplomats at that country's permanent mission to the United Nations in New York, warning them directly against going ahead with a launch.

    Such direct contact is highly unusual, since American officials limit their direct talks with their North Korean counterparts. But "we needed to make sure there was no misunderstanding," one senior Bush administration official said today.

    In Japan, Foreign Minister Taro Aso warned that a miscalculation could result in the missile landing on Japanese territory. "If it is dropped on Japan, it will complicate the story," he told Japanese television today. "It will be regarded as an attack."

    Mr. Aso later toned down his language, saying, "we will not right away view it as a military act," but he said Japan would seek an immediate meeting of the Security Council if Pyongyang goes ahead with the missile launch.

    A test of the long-range missile by North Korea would be the first since 1998, when it fired a three-stage Taepodong 1 missile over Japan, catching American intelligence officials by surprise. That led Congress to step up its push for deployment of anti-missile defenses.

    A year later, in 1999, North Korea agreed to a moratorium on long-range missile testing and has not fired one since.

    But five weeks ago, American officials received satellite images that showed North Korea preparing to test a multiple-stage Taepodong 2 missile. Some Bush administration officials at first suspected that the moves were a grab for attention while Washington's focus was primarily on Iran and a way to press the United States to agree to direct talks. But since then, diplomats on both sides of the Pacific have become increasingly concerned that North Korea does indeed plan to go ahead with a launch.

    "Why they are doing this? You will have to ask them," one senior Bush administration official said today. "It is not in anyone's interest; certainly not theirs. For our part, we will not be derailed by their temper tantrums nor have any of our own."

    The officials would not be more specific about the information they have received, and most would discuss the matter only after being promised anonymity, saying the sensitive diplomatic and intelligence concerns meant they could not speak for the record.

    American knowledge about the Taepodong 2 is limited. The system has never been flight-tested. American intelligence has steadily increased the estimates of its range. In 2001, a National Intelligence Estimate forecast that a three-stage version of the Taepodong 2 missile could reach all of North America with a sizable payload.

    The Taepodong 2 is believed to have three stages. The first is thought to be a cluster of North Korea's No Dong missiles; the second stage is believed to be a No Dong missile, and the third stage might be a solid-fueled system, according to experts who have studied what a Taepodong might look like.

    A test of the missile would ignite a political chain reaction in Japan, the United States and China. The Bush administration might step up financing for missile defense efforts. Japan might increase its missile defense efforts as well, while hard-liners there might even push to reconsider the nation's nuclear weapons options. Both moves would alienate China.

    In North Korea, Pyongyang reportedly told its citizens to raise the national flag at 2 p.m. local time today (1 a.m. Eastern time) and prepare for an announcement on television, a Japanese newspaper said, igniting rumors that a missile test was imminent. But that time came and passed without incident, and American officials say they believe the report was unrelated to a missile test.

    North Korea is a secretive Stalinist state and figuring out the motives of its leader, Kim Jong Il, has stymied diplomats for years. But experts say there are two main reasons why the North Korean regime might launch a missile right now.

    For one thing, the country's military may well want to verify their missile capability. It has almost eight years since the last missile launch, which occurred in August 1998, and "it may well be that Kim Jong Il is getting a lot of pressure from his generals to verify the design" of the Taepodong 2 missile, said Robert Einhorn, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and former assistant secretary of state for nonproliferation under President Bill Clinton.

    But, he added, "whenever the North Koreans act up, one has to assume in part at least that they are trying to get the world's attention."

    Just two weeks ago — a day after the United States offered to hold direct talks with Iran over its nuclear program — North Korea invited Christopher R. Hill, an assistant secretary of state and chief negotiator on the North's nuclear weapons program, for direct talks in Pyongyang. That offer was immediately rebuffed by the White House, which insisted that the North return to the long-deadlocked six-nation talks instead. The other nations involved in the talks are China, South Korea, Japan and Russia.

    North Korea has boycotted the talks in recent months after the United States cracked down on financial institutions, including a bank in Macau, that dealt with the government in Pyongyang and with North Korean companies suspected of counterfeiting American dollars and laundering money. If North Korea goes ahead with a missile launching, the already floundering talks would likely go into a deep freeze.


  6. #6
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    926

    Default A Most Unhelpful Neighbor

    North Korea -- the world's biggest prison camp -- is certainly not helping matters much. I would consider launch of an ICBM as a direct threat to the United States, and say so publicly. In the words of President Kennedy, this would be the equivalent of an attack, requiring a "full retaliatory response."

  7. #7
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Yeah, but where's the Yellowcake?

  8. #8
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clifton, NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge
    Yeah, but where's the Yellowcake?
    lol, Good one!

  9. #9
    Banned Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    8,113

    Default

    Smoke and mirrors. Smoke and mirrors.

    We appreciate all the concern about Iran and North Korea, but let's stay focused on Iraq. Obviously, it is a big boost to the president to rattle the saber over the "axis of evil" - blah, blah, blah.

    It's fear mongering.

  10. #10
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    But BR, in this case, it is more warranted than a "suspected" program for the development of nuclear weapons.

    I do agree it is fear mongering, but saying that it does not matter..... I don't know about that.

  11. #11
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clifton, NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    I just hope this isn't like the movie "Canadian Bacon" ~_~ There is an election coming this fall.. (Hey everyone hates the North Koreans ^_^)
    Last edited by OmegaNYC; June 20th, 2006 at 09:53 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    926

    Default

    Let's not forget that the North Korean government is a group of real nutjobs. It wouldn't surprise me in the least that they'd pull some stupid stunt, like lobbing a nuke at Los Angeles for sport. Imagine, if you will, what the behind-the-scenes negotiations are like. I suspect we're giving them a clear message: "if you launch, we launch." This is probably scaring the wits out of the Chinese, who will most likely turn the screws on their wonderful fun-loving Communist Party animals to the south.

  13. #13
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clifton, NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    NK isn't stupid. They know the policy of major nuclear powers is MAD (Mutual assured destruction). If they launch, even without the intent to hit the US, the US, will fire an ICBM towards Pyongyang in a jiffy.

  14. #14

    Default

    I wonder how many of these are flying over Japan/Korea right now.

    They have some fantastic range:

    http://www.military.com/soldiertech/...h_ABL,,00.html

    The point with the missile launch is that once performed, the North Koreans will have the data from the launch to see how to improve their missiles (range, accuracy etc). I read that there's an interest for a strike to stop the missile from flying (and therefore stop the NKRP from getting this data).

    Nice laser.

  15. #15

    Default

    Yeah, NK isn't stupid because....

    Where are those 6 missiles streaking accross the sky from?

    Guess we were all wrong.

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Metro-North Tracks
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 9th, 2014, 12:30 AM
  2. Queens North Shore Photo Tour
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: April 21st, 2009, 11:12 PM
  3. Bloomberg Attacks Plan to Buy Metro-North Cars
    By Kris in forum New York Metro
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 12th, 2005, 10:15 PM
  4. North Brooklyn leap year special
    By Gulcrapek in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: March 1st, 2004, 04:23 PM
  5. North by Northwest query - Architecture and Film
    By notnlk in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: June 16th, 2003, 07:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software