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Thread: Prospect Heights Development

  1. #1

    Default Prospect Heights Development

    Hi, not an offering of sale or anything. Just trying to get some discourse going on this interesting project. Please let me know if I have posted inappropriately.

    Here's an article from the Brooklyn Eagle:

    35 Underhill: First New Residential Development in Prospect Heights
    by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 06-04-2004


    39 Units, Outdoor Space, Gym Planned in Glass Tower
    PROSPECT HEIGHTS — Calling it “The Glass Tower,” developer Isaac Fischman said he wanted his new condominium development at 35 Underhill Ave., between Pacific and Dean Streets in Prospect Heights, to have lots of glass and lots of light. “I also wanted to have very large apartments to accommodate families,” he told the Brooklyn Eagle this week. Families, couples and singles will be accommodated in the structure, which is actually two buildings with a shared lobby and cellar but with separate elevators and stairways. Although the bulk of the 39 units are two and three-bedroom apartments, there are also a few studios and one-bedroom units and one-bedrooms with mezzanines. The sizes range from 480 square feet for a studio to more than 1,500 square feet for a three-bedroom. Fischman, a partner with 630 Realty LLC, the owner/developers, also believes the 80,000-square-foot complex is the first brand new construction in Prospect Heights in many years. The partners acquired the formerly vacant land for development because the neighborhood is “so up and coming,” he said, pointing out that there is a brand new cafe on nearby Washington Avenue and the newly renovated Brooklyn Museum is only a seven-block walk. In addition to the large units, the development has several unique features, according to Fischman. These include designing four of the units as duplexes, each with their own private entrance along Underhill Avenue; setting aside one floor in each building where the units have mezzanines and double-height windows and ceilings; and creating a lot of outdoor space — every unit has either a balcony or a rooftop terrace, some have both, and there is a large private courtyard for residents. The project will also have a gym and parking for 20 cars underground. What is still up in the air, according to Fischman, is whether to have additional parking at street level or to create a retail space. Fanny Sahar, the project manager and spokesperson for the design team of Robert Scarano Jr. and Yuliana Pritzker at Scarano & Associates Architects, concurred that the project is “one of the first buildings in this neighborhood since it was rezoned as a moderate density area.” The structure is in an area of many brownstones and otherwise low-rise residential buildings and the designers put a lot of effort into meeting the challenge of having a rather large building that is of moderate density — hence the “huge” units and great amenities, according to Sahar. But she feels the project is also unique for another reason. “We wanted to do something different in this neighborhood,” she said. “We believe it will be the first light-colored building in the area. We’ve used a light yellow brick and metal panels that are a light shade of blue-green. This project will transform the area totally.” Additionally, these materials “age well and preserve the low-key residential nature of the neighboring homes,” she added. Sahar estimates that completion is still about nine months away but said there has been a lot of interest from prospective buyers already. Fischman has selected Aguayo & Huebener Realty to handle condo sales, which could begin as early as late summer or early fall, or as soon as a model apartment is ready, he said. The firm is keeping list of those interested in the project.
    © Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2004

    http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categor...ce.php?id=1735

    PARK SLOPE VIC/PROSPECT HTS
    Sneak Preview
    The Washington
    +Chic SOHO luxury at Bklyn prices
    +The 1st glass tower condo in B/S Bklyn
    +Central Air & Private outdoor space
    +Indoor Parking
    +Floor to ceiling wrap-around windows
    +Loft-style height w/mezzan & 2 full ba
    +Marbl/slate/brushed chrome finishes
    +Modern Chef's Kitchen
    +Soaring glass atrium entrance
    +Private Gym
    +Common Japanese Interior Garden
    2-3 BRs priced from $479K-$799K
    CALL AGUAYO & HUEBENER
    718-622-9300 718-788-8200
    Offering by prospectus only
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  2. #2

    Default

    Hi, not an offering of sale or anything. Just trying to get some discourse going on this interesting project. Please let me know if I have posted inappropriately.
    Not a problem. Although instead of starting a new thread you might want to consider posting in a thread specified here, next time.

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
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    2,805

    Default

    Pretty lame they're marketing it as a 'glass tower.' There are many new developments much glassier.

  4. #4

    Default glass tower

    what other glass towers are there in bklyn? i know there are a lot in
    manhattan.

    designed by scarano architects also.

  5. #5

    Default

    what other glass towers are there in bklyn? i know there are a lot in
    manhattan.

    designed by scarano architects also.
    You do have a point although its equivalent to other buildings in Brooklyn, nothing more. I think at one time there was a Meier residential development floating around, although I think Brooklyn should advance its signature style more, and create some truly innovative brick and glass designs.

  6. #6

    Default 35 Underhill Avenue

    Or maybe we could rename this thread Prospect Heights Developments.

    Project #1 & 2

    35 Underhill Avenue I
    7 stories 70 feet
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Isaac Fischman
    Residential Condominiums
    45 units 76,182 Sq. Ft
    Under Construction 2003-2005

    35 Underhill Avenue II
    7 stories 70 feet
    Scarano & Associate Architects
    Dev-Isaac Fischman
    Residential Condominiums
    45 units 76,182 Sq. Ft
    Under Construction 2003-2005




    35 Underhill Avenue

    http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/contentManaged/

    This new residential development is located in the Prospect Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn. It is one of the first buildings in this neighborhood since it was rezoned as a moderate density area, and is therefore one of the larger buildings on the block.

    This scale presented a challenge in trying to maintain a contextual vernacular, while maximizing the allowed floor area, of approx 80,000 S.F. expected by the client.
    The context prompted the use of materials such as brick on the front facade and split face concrete block on the rear of the building. These materials age well and preserve the low key residential nature of the neighboring homes.

    The exteriors are masking a modern structural system of load bearing concrete block walls steel beams and light gage metal. Framing by using modern detailing in a traditional way allowed the building to fit into to its neighborhood brownstone context.

    This new residential development is located in the Prospect Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn. It is one of the first buildings in this neighborhood since it was rezoned as a moderate density area, and is therefore one of the larger buildings on the block. This scale presented a challenge in trying to maintain a contextual vernacular, while maximizing the allowed floor area, of approx 80,000 S.F. expected by the client.

    The context prompted the use of materials such as brick on the front facade and split face concrete block on the rear of the building. These materials age well and preserve the low key residential nature of the neighboring homes.

    The exteriors are masking a modern structural system of load bearing concrete block walls steel beams and light gage metal. Framing by using modern detailing in a traditional way allowed the building to fit into to its neighborhood brownstone context.



    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...51/ai_n8592607

    Condo project 'benchmark' for new construction design
    Real Estate Weekly, Dec 22, 2004
    new

    Save a personal copy of this article and quickly find it again with Furl.net. Get started now. (It's free.)

    As one of the first new multi-family projects to be built in Prospect Heights in recent years, the four and six-story, glass and brick two-tower condominium designed by Scarano & Associates Architects--i.e., The Washington Building at 35 Underhill Avenue, between Pacific and Dean Streets--is a benchmark for new construction in Prospect Heights, pursuant to the area's recent rezoning as a moderate density area.

    Designed as two buildings with a shared cellar, separate elevators and stairways, the west tower stands four stories high and its eastern counterpart rises to six stories. In terms of height and massing, the 80,000-square-foot development has been designed to maximize floor area while addressing the architectural context of the surrounding neighborhood, which is primarily made up of low-rise buildings and brownstones. To accomplish this challenge, Scarano Associates designer Julia Pritzker and project manager Fanny Sahar utilized irregular building heights, extra-large windows and light-colored brick, thereby conveying a transparency that blends into the contextual vernacular of the area.

    "We believe we had a responsibility both to the developer and the community," says Robert Scarano, principal of the architecture firm. "Since we were among the first to design a new building in this area, we were setting an important architectural standard. But we were also obligated to meet the requirements of the developer, 630 Realty, LLC. I believe our solution will be of great benefit to the area in terms of future design and on behalf of the developer, the units are already selling out although construction is not yet completed."

    The 39 units at The Washington Building are unusually large for the area and range in size from 630-square-foot studios to 1,500-square-foot three-bedroom apartments.

    COPYRIGHT 2004 Hagedorn Publication
    COPYRIGHT 2005 Gale Group
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  7. #7

    Default

    Or maybe we could rename this thread Prospect Heights Developments.
    Done.

  8. #8
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Harlem
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Scarano has a lot of much glassier buildings is what I meant, I guess. There aren't any large scale glass developments yet (except maybe Schaefer Landing).

  9. #9

    Default ?

    hey, derek2k3, where did you get that last picture on your thread- did you take it yourself?

    thanks.

  10. #10

    Default 893-895 Pacific Street

    Quote Originally Posted by ltjbukem73
    hey, derek2k3, where did you get that last picture on your thread- did you take it yourself?

    thanks.
    Yup, no problem.

    Project #3

    893-895 Pacific Street
    4 stories
    Mark Verkhovsky Architect
    Dev-Pacific Street Associates LLC
    Residential Rental
    8 units 5,100 Sq. Ft.
    Completed 2004



    http://www.nychdc.com/pressroom/anno...fic.street.htm

    APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE FOR NEWLY CONSTRUCTED APARTMENTS LOCATED IN THE PROSPECT HEIGHTS AREA OF BROOKLYN
    16 Apartments available at below-market rents

    Brooklyn, NY, October 20, 2003

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The New York City Housing Development Corporation (HDC) announces that applications are available now for 16 newly constructed affordable housing rental apartments at 893-895 Pacific Street, Brooklyn. Apartments vary in size and include 8 one-bedrooms, and 8 two-bedrooms, and are reserved for households with an annual income ranging from $65,000 to $134,400 (incomes vary within these bounds depending on apartment size and family size).

    The development is under construction by the Pacific Street Associates LLC, an entity formed by the principals of the Borj Construction Company. The development has been financed through the sale of bonds from HDC's New HOP program. In accordance with the New HOP program, 16 apartments are available for middle-income residents who make up to 250% of the area median income.

    To request an application for one of the below-market-rate units, please send a letter and a self addressed envelope to:

    Pacific Associates
    895 Pacific Street
    Brooklyn, NY 11238
    (718) 638-3737 between 12am to 1pm.


    Applications will be mailed to requesters though November 18, 2003. Completed applications must be received by management no later than December 1, 2003. Eligibility is based on income, family composition, continuing need and other factors.

    Applicants will be selected through a lottery system.
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    Last edited by Derek2k3; July 2nd, 2005 at 01:05 AM.

  11. #11

    Default 35 Underhill Ave.

    35 Underhill Ave. looks good.

  12. #12

    Thumbs up 35 Underhill Ave.

    35 Underhill Ave.
    02/13/05

    Scarano Architects
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  13. #13

    Default 800-802 Bergen Street

    Project #4

    800-802 Bergen Street
    8 stories 70 feet
    Hugo S. Subotovsky A.I.A., Architect
    Dev-Strategic Development Corporation
    Residential Rental
    32 units 35,112 Sq. Ft.
    Completed 2003



    http://www.nychdc.org/apartments/d_n...ooklyn.htm#p13

    Project: 800-802 Bergen Street
    Address 800-802 Bergen Street
    Brooklyn
    Managing Agent

    New Start, LLC
    50 Greene Avenue
    Brooklyn, NY 11221

    For an application, please send written request with self-addressed, stamped envelope to Managing Agent.
    Total Units
    (Including Superintendent's Unit) 32
    Expected Initial* Rents Studio - 2 BRs
    $620 - $1,050
    Status Contact Managing Agent regarding potential vacancies.

    It looks as if it was clad with wallpaper.
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    Last edited by Derek2k3; July 2nd, 2005 at 01:06 AM.

  14. #14

    Default 880 Bergen Street

    Project #5

    880 Bergen Street
    878-888 Bergen Street/467-475 St. Mark's Avenue
    14 stories 137 feet
    Nick Tsapatsaris & Associates
    Dev-467-475 St. Mark's Avenue LLC
    Residential
    120 units 111,080 Sq. Ft.
    Under Construction 2004-2006



    I'm curious what this is going to look like. Going to be one of the tallest buildings in the area.
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    Last edited by Derek2k3; November 5th, 2005 at 07:31 PM.

  15. #15

    Default

    ^no problem

    Check out this Prospect Heights blog:
    http://prospectheights.typepad.com/

    Dated but informative article on Prospect Heights development from the Brooklyn Rail.

    http://www.thebrooklynrail.org/tbr/l...ectheights.htm

    Here Comes the Neighborhood:
    Prospect Heights
    by Eric Neutuch
    [From the Autumn 2002 print issue]

    Marc J. Freud, the developer of a luxury loft building on Pacific Street in Prospect Heights, hopes to recast a once gritty corner of the Heights as NoFA: North of Flatbush Avenue.


    To B. V. King, a retired daycare worker and a longtime Prospect Heights homeowner, the NoFA branding, for the triangular area bounded by Flatbush, Atlantic, and Carlton Avenues, is a rude imposition. "I doubt that it's going to catch on," she says defiantly. And she is probably right. The local brokers have not been hyping "NoFA," and even the latest newspaper ads for Mr. Freud's Atlantic Art Building have dropped the NoFA label.

    Nonetheless, Mr. Freud's attempt at NoFA urban cosmetics is a signpost for things are happening in and around the northern part of the Heights. The empty industrial lots along Dean and Pacific Streets are being rejuvenated by a residential housing boom. There's new middle-income affordable housing and industrial-to-luxury loft conversions, and, at the district's perimeter, a Target-anchored mall and a 12-story office tower are under construction for the site above the Long Island Railroad Terminal.

    "NoFA is about to arrive," boasts Mr. Freud. But nobody, not even Mr. Freud, thinks that the northern part of the Heights will "happen" Williamsburg, Fort Greene, or Park Slope-style; the neighborhood lacks the hip L-trainers, rich African-American cultural history, or stately brown-stones to be the next big Brooklyn thing. Furthermore, though the redeveloped district will have the mall access and parking availability of a New Jersey suburb, the Heights hardly stands to become a 'burb.

    According to almost everyone's assessments, the Heights' industrial north is redeveloping as a mixed-income neighborhood. With about 1,000 new residents expected by mid-2003, the area now has a distinctly post-industrial lease on life.

    A Luxury Loft Grows in Brooklyn

    Cathy Guerra, a 34-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant and resident of Dean Street, woke up many mornings this past summer to the pounding of jackhammers, as work was being done to convert a gargantuan former Daily News printing plant at 535 Dean to a 137-unit luxury condominium building, known as Newswalk. Her daughter puts her hands over her ears when her mom talks about the construction sounds, but Ms. Guerra says, "The trucks were worse," referring to the early morning rattle of the Daily News pickups that lasted until the plant was decommissioned in 1997.

    There will be quiet for Ms. Guerra and her family soon. Newswalk, which is the neighborhood's largest and, literally, most visible industrial-to-residential conversion--with the hulking building dominating the skyline-- will be completed in the early winter. The 88 units in the first phase of sales and construction sold out at prices ranging from $315,000 for a 690 square-foot studio to $1.3 million for a 2,500 square-foot penthouse with 2,500 square feet of terrace space. The new elevator tower, which is visible from the street, is clad in rectangles of peach and blue-tinted glass and encased within a ragged concrete shell.

    The 1999 zoning change requested by the Newswalk developers set off a conversion spree in the northern part of the Heights. At Sixth Avenue and Pacific, a shuttered Spalding factory reopened in spring as 21 raw space lofts-- that dot-com boom badge of honor. Half a block away, at 636 Pacific, Mr. Freud's development corporation, Troutbrook Properties, is nearing completion on 31 luxury condos in the eight-story Atlantic Art Building, previously a storage warehouse (but not art studios, as the name might imply). At 616-630 Dean, work has begun on the conversion of two low-rise industrial buildings to 21 condominiums, and at 750 Pacific, a commercial property is being converted to residential use by the Newswalk developers.

    But the redevelopment of the Heights is not limited to luxury housing. Along Underhill Avenue and Bergen and Dean Streets, 27 newly completed three-family townhouses, called the Prospect Heights Homes, are beginning occupancy by middle-income and upper middle-income owners. The homes, built with sponsorship from the City's Department of Housing Preservation and Development, were sold for between $363,000 and $400,000 to people earning between $65,000 and $100,000 a year. They are red brick with aluminum-sided backs and have some exterior piping and small yards of grass in the front. Each includes an owner-designated 1,800 square-foot two-bedroom unit and two rental units: a studio and a two-bedroom. For the price of a 1,000 square-foot apartment in a Pacific or Dean Street condo building, the Prospect Heights owners will have nearly twice as much space as their luxury loft neighbors plus rental income of over $2,000 per month.

    Additionally, 32 affordable housing three-family homes are under construction for lots on Atlantic Avenue, South Portland Avenue, and South Oxford Street. Approximately 3,000 applicants competed in a lottery for the right to purchase the homes at approximately $400,000 each. The red brick with green trim townhouses, which lie on the southern edge of Fort Greene adjoining Prospect Heights, are part of the Atlantic Center development project, which produced the blocks of similar units on nearby Cumberland and South Oxford Streets in the late 1990s.

    The Heights is also home to a new homeless shelter at 768-772 Pacific between Carlton and Vanderbilt Avenues, with another homeless shelter proposed for 603 Dean Street but caught in legal and political wrangling. If this second shelter is opened, the two shelters together will house 100 families and make for an especially mixed-income community. There is much opposition to the shelters from both the Prospect Heights Action Coalition and the neighborhood's elected officials. Councilman James E. Davis, who brags that he has "everybody-- gay, straight, rich, poor, Hasidim, liberal Jews, white, black, housing developments, [and] the Hispanic community-- in my neighborhood," said that the housing shelters would be an unwelcome blight on a community district "overburdened" with social service agencies and that they will "make it more difficult for the neighborhood to grow." This, of course, may or may not be true.

    Moving to Brooklyn

    John (who declined to give his last name and age), a creative advertising director who bought a Newswalk loft six months ago after renting in Little Italy, says, "Here there's more space for the money." This is a common sentiment among the new condominium buyers. Drawn by the low prices relative to Manhattan and Park Slope, the "proximity" to the Atlantic Avenue transportation hub, the "industrial feel" of the high-ceiling spaces, the "mix of people," and the "convenience" of the nearby Atlantic Center mall, they include both newcomers from Manhattan and previous Brooklynites. In the Heights' industrial corridor, they have discovered a cheaper alternative to Park Slope that is, unlike many cheaper alternatives to Park Slope (e.g., East New York, Brownsville, etc.), an acceptable place for young professionals to call home.

    The new buyers talk the neighborhood up. Allan Bobadilla, a thirtysomething Spalding building buyer, calls it "funky," while John says it is "like SoHo in the 1970s." (Since their property values are at stake, one can understand their overenthusiasm.) But when pressed, both acknowledge the neighborhood's eyesores: the railroad cut that runs along Atlantic Avenue, the views of the 25-story Atlantic Terminal public housing project, and the empty storefronts on Flatbush and Vanderbilt Avenues.

    Local retail development, aside from the continued mall-ing and chainstore-ification of the Atlantic and Flatbush Avenue intersection, has lagged behind the rapid residential rejuvenation. New retail growth is "a matter of time," said Mick Pearce, a co-owner of Tavern on Dean, an English-style pub on Dean at Underhill which opened in September 2000. Mr. Pearce said this in late August, and as quick proof, Soda Bar, an IKEA-styled spot, opened in early September in the center of the Heights. Deborah Whitney, Soda's manager, said, "Customers are so thankful. They come in and say, ÔOh my god, there's nothing else around here.'" Still, this makes for only two light fare choices in the Heights, leaving open much room for growth.

    Future Prospects

    In talking about redevelopment in the Heights' industrial north, Roslyn B. Huebener of Aguayo & Huebener Realty Group asks rhetorically, in a tone that implies an automatic "yes" response, "Isn't it wonderful?" "The development is not interrupting housing where it already exists," she says. "It brings historic neighborhoods together."

    Nobody disputes these things, but less debatable than "wonderful" is that the redevelopment has been "inevitable," say the Heights' residents. "This was the last spot between Park Slope and Fort Greene that was not fully developed. It had to happen," says one owner from Prospect Heights Homes. The empty industrial buildings were too ripe for conversion and too close to gentrified areas to sit idle any longer.

    Dennis Drucker, the chairman of the housing and land use committee of Community Board #8, also sees the onset of high-income luxury housing as inevitable. He explains the board's support of the zoning change that made Newswalk and the other industrial conversions possible. In his office, which is plastered with liberal political posters including a "I have a right to be LEFT" sign, he says, "The Brooklyn real estate market is madder than anywhere else. For people who have grown up in the neighborhood who are selling, this is great. But for those who are renting, it is very difficult to stay. The neighborhood will continue to lose its industrial base and become whiter and richer. There doesn't seem to be anything stopping this trend, not the market downturn or 9/11." As Drucker told the New York Times this past March, "We decided that a live residential building is better than a dead factory."

    The full effect of the redevelopment and population influx on the Heights' industrial north remains to be seen, yet Jacqueline Spence of Goldwin Real Estate says that it is all "overrated." Regarding the condominium buyers, she wonders whether they will "run back to Manhattan" once the economy improves. And of the Prospect Heights Homes, she says, "It looks cheap. They call it affordable middle-income housing, but it looks like low-income housing."

    But might not the redevelopment still be wonderful? Affordable housing has been included; a use has been found for a deindustrialized wasteland; and, because the redevelopment has been carried out in a previously non-residential area, there has been little of gentrification's displacement effect on local renters. As Ms. Spence, who has been in Prospect Heights for nearly twenty years, acknowledges, "There's a bright future here. The neighborhood has come a long way."
    Last edited by Derek2k3; February 22nd, 2005 at 12:54 AM.

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